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M. 



^. 



Keeping the 
chemistry in 
abigfamiiy 

Page 6 




4th of July 
festivities 
are planned 

Pages4&5 





mist is^-^ 



VIRGIN [A STATE LIBRARY 



H. S CAPITAI I.' 



VA 



I') 



Wednesday, July 1, 19'r' 



SERVING THE CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 




The rally ran from about 1 :30 to 4:30 p.m. This photo was 
taken srfwut 2:30 p.m. Michael E. Rau said after the event 

Local Perot media director Rau 
"jacked" over main attendance 
figure used by The Virginian-Pilot 

Presidential hopeful probably coming 
to Williamsburg, not Virginia Beach 



The skies were clear. The 
weather was hot. and eveiything 
was set up and ready last Sunday 
afternoon at Duck-In on Shore 
Drive iox Ross Perot's first major 
fund-raising event in Virginia 
Beach. 



Inside Politics 

by 
GREG GOLDFARB 



The rally went off fine, said 
Michael E. Ran. (fistdel media 
director for the local Perot camp. 
But questicms have tieen raised as 
to the event's attendance figures. 

Rau estimates there woe about 
1,500 attendees at the lieach 
party. The Virginian-Pilot re- 
ported the next day, however, that 
only several peo|4e, attended. 

"Local campaign fund-raiser 
Christina Bublick said between 
1,500 and 2,000 people were 
there. A police officer at the 
event estimstted the crowd at sev- 
eral hundred," Virginian-Pilot 
staff writer Lynn Waltz wrote in 
her story. But. she put "about 
300 showed up" in her first para- 



graph. And the story's headline 
and subhead said, in part. 
"Turnout low . . . event was 
planned for several thousand." 

Rau said Monday afternoon 
that the Associated Press ran a 
correction on the attendance fig- 
ures. He said he had. a call into 
the Norfolk-based newspaper's 
editor, but had not received a re- 
sponse. One local television sta- 
tion reported the attendance at 
2.500. 

"What really jacked all of us 
was the Pilot's riffleulousljriow" 
attendance figure the writer used 
at the main attendance figure. 
Rau said. Rau said the police of- 
ficer who gave the number should 
have been identified in the stcny. 

Rau also said that, to his 
knowledge, if Waltz was at the 
event she did not identify herself 
to any of his camp members. 

Rau said Waltz and/or the 
Norfolk newspaper is guilty of 
"unseen motivation" in its 
reporting of the event. 

Perot, who, if he officially de- 
clares his independent candidacy 
for president, will likely face Re- 
publican Ih-esident Gecffge Bush 



that original 
mistic. 


attendance projections were overly opti- 


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Virginia Btach Sim staff phoUu 

The front gate, where $10 tickets were collected and sokf.. 



and Democrat Bill Clinton in the 
November election. 

The Perot rally, Rau said, was 
the largest local one for a 
presidential candidate that he can 
remember. 

There may be more future Vir- 
ginia Beach activities for Pnot. 
Rau said, but nothing definite has 
been set 

Perot is not expected to visit 
Virginia Beach. Rau said, but he 
may go to Williamsburg later 
this summer. 



Rau said his camp has l>6en 
instructed not to talk to Waltz. 

About 1.300 advance $10 
tickets were sold. Rau said, and 
more were sold at the front gate. 
He said he expected the event to 
gross about $15,000 to $20,000 
before expenses. Thiee-fourths of 
that will go to pay the bills. Rau 
said, and the remaining money is 
divided between the local and 
state Perot camps, widi 80 per- 
cent going to the local effort and 
the remaining 20 percent to the 
state. 




This tent was located just south of the area pictured in the top photo of this box. 



Cape Henry Women's 
Club's Sugar Plum Tree 
coming up in Lynnhaven 



Set for July 8 to 14 
at Lynnhaven Jr. High 

By M.J. RICHARDS 
Virginia B«aQh Sun Staff Writar 

For 20 years, seniors have been 
bringing handmade afghans. blan- 
kets. t»by clothes and furniture to 
the Sugv Plum Tree mtfts draw. 

The show, sponsned by the Cape 
Henry Woman's Club, gives area 
senior citizens a chance to sell their ' 
handmade wares to the public dur- 
ing the week-l(mg sale. 

This year's Sugar Plum Tree will 
be held from Wednesday, July 8 
through Tuesday. July 14 at 
Lynnhaven Junior High School (W 
Bayneftive. 



"We do get some beautiful things 
• some afghans and quilts, some 
baby clothes, blankets, toys and 
baby items, said Dorothy Traub. a 
spokesperson for the Cape Henry 
Woman's Club and a former Sugar 
Plum Tree chair. 

Last year 170 s«iiors Imnight in 
their items, which are aa:q)ted two 
days before the fair begins. Each 
item is tagged, pric«] and recorded, 
so records may be kept of exactly 
what was sold. 

During the past 19 yean, nearly 
$341,000 has been eaned by the 
seniors from the s«Ue of their crafts. 

Traub. 56. a Kings Grant ro- 
dent, said diat each senior brings 
usually a few hundred items. This 
year, the club has asked them to 




The Sugar Plum Tree was held at Lynnhaven Junior High 
School. 



limit items to 200 per pCTSon. 

Traub said that there are so many 
items that many cannot be put out 
right away, but mua wait in boxes 
until there is room for the woman's 
club volunteers to set them out. 

The first day of the Sugar Plum 
Tree is, according to Traub, the 
most successful. She said most 
people come on the first day to get 
the most selection. Many people 
oocnt loddi% fa specific haiidmade 



items which are lHt)ught in every 
year. 

"(We have) several retired men 
domg some beautifiil woodwmk and 
small furniture." said Traub. She 
said quilt racks aid wooden toys are 
very populm'. "A lot of them have 
worksho|» set iqj in their pnige 
and they enjoy doing it" 

One wonm wtw comes each year 

D 8m 8UQAII, Pages 



Sun 



65th Year No. 27 25 Cents 



To some, resort 
restrictions malce 
sense; to others, no 



Some feel sorry for 
the tourists; others 
just don't understand 

By M.J. RICHARDS 
Virginia Beach Sun Staff Writer 

The signs are posted everywhere. 

No cruising on Atlantic Avenue. 

No pets on the beach from 
Memcnial Day through Lalxir Day. 

No skateboarding on the sidewalk 
on Atlantic Avenue. 

The list goes on and on. 

The Virginia Beach City Council 
recently passed or reinforced these 
and other ordinances in onto' to de- 
crease the amount of traffic and 
beach congestion at the Oceanfront 

While some residents and tourists 
say they barely notice a difference 
because it does not affect them, 
others say there are too many rules. 

The cruising ordinance, which 
prohibits vehicles from passing the 
same point on Atlantic Avenue 
more than twice within a three-hour 
period between 2 p.m. adn 2 a.m. 
from April 15 to Sept. 30, is a 
prime example. 

John Place. 34. of Kempsville, 
said the cruising ordinance doesn't 
directly affect him at his two chil- 
dren. 

**The Cruising. I'm a little to old 
for that" he said. 

He said that any changes in the 
ordinances at the beach don't seem 
to bother his children, John, 10, 
and Carrie, 8. 

"No issue could get to them. 
They're oblivious to what's going 
on. They just want to play and 
boogie board." he said. "But I'm 
sure it will affect then when they 



get older." 

He said that he doesn't Uiink new 
rules will have a negative influence 
on tourists, because they are im- 
plemented for a reason. 

Frank Martin, 62, visiting from 
Allentown. Penn., agrees. 

"It doesn't bother us," he said. 
"As long as people follow the 
rules." 

Stephanie Sonmez, 13, and 
Michelle Beck, 14, from Arlington, 
Va., however don't like the new 
cruising ordinance. 



..u CRUISING 
ON ATLANTIC AVE 

UNLAWFUL TO PASS 

SAME POINT 2 TIMES 

IN 3 HOUR PERIOD 

2 PM - 2 AM 

APRIL 15 - SEPT. 30 



An ordinance was passed, and 
signs went up announcing the 
ban. 

"It bothers me," said Sonmez, 
who's *ere for two weeks. "It's 
fine, like regular laws. But, you're 
here to have fun and they're 
restricting everything. I mean, 
what's the beach for, but to have 
fiin?" 

Beck agreed, saying there is little 
entertainment for young people, 
except driving around. 

"I think it's dumb," said Beck. 

D 8m DO'S, Page 5 




From left, Stephanie Sonmez, 13, and Michelle Beck. 14, of 
Arlington, Va., say the new cruising ordinance cuts down on 
their fun. 




John Place, 34, of Kempsville, center, said the, new ordi- 
nances at the Ocaanfrom <ton1 fclher him or his children 
John, 10, arnJ Carrte. 8. 



1 Vinrinui Beich Sun. Wedneadav. July 1. 1992 



Editorials 



Shop in Virginia Beach 

taxes are a burden for everyone, but there is a single way to 
help raise the Virginia Beach tax base everyday, so you won't 
be hit so heavily when the city lodes at its income. 

The solution is simple. If you need to buy something, buy it 
in Virginia Beach. 

Why give your money to other cities? Spend it at home, and 
you'll help yourself ana your neighbors in the long run by 
giving more sales tax to your city. 

Not only docs it increase Virginia Beach's tax base, it helps 
support local merchants. 

If you can't find what you're looking for in your neighbor- 
hood, let your local merchants know. TTiey may not know there 
is a demand for the product unless you tell them. 

Merchants like to please their customers. It only makes 
sense. 

By buying things in Virginia Beach, it is not only more con- 
venient for you in terms of time and distance, it increases the 
city's tax revenue. — M.J.R. 




Another View 

Someone should find out if 
Bush ever attended a Tailhook 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. StB- 
iion$, Virginia 
Btaek Sun col- 
umnitt. 



I remember the words of a song 
that was pqMilar during my boyhood 
days that went something like this - 
"Shipmates stand togedier. don't 
give up the ship. In fair or stormy 
weather, we won'tgive up. We won't 
give up the diip." 

That seems 
to be the posi- 
tion that has 
been esub- 
lished by the 
U.S. Navy in 
the "tailhook 
scandal" that 
took place at 
Las Vegas in 
September, 
where 26 
women Tom- 
plained that 
they were vic- 
tims of sexual 
harassment 

The women 
say that a group 
— ■"— -""^ of young offi- 
cers gathered in the hall grabbing at 
women as they walked by. They 
would grab breasts and crotches and 
even try to remove the women's 
ctothing. In most courts in the U.S.. 
excq>t periups in Massachusetts, 
that kind of conduct would constitute 
criminal attempted rape. But since it 
was done by "officers and gentle- 
men," the Navy has mishandled this 
investigttion almost as badly as diey 
did the USS Iowa blast, where they 
tried to put the blame on a poor sailor 
who was killed in the blast and ooukl 
not defend himself. 

1 And myself in the uncomfortable 
position of standing on die same side 
of the street with U.S. Re]nesentadve 
Pat Schroeder (the one with the fake 
smile and droopy eydicQ when she 
said, regarding the Navy's handling 
of dte "tailhook inckknt." They've 
winked at it for so long and played the 
"boys will be boys." 

They did nothing but try to stone- 
wall and cover it up. I have three 
daughters, and 1 woukl beready to 
take names and kick some asses if my 



Moit U.S. coiirti, 

except periuqyt In 

Maetachuiettf, 

would conilder the 

mcn'e action «i 

criminal attempted 

rape. 



daughters, had been subjected to that 
kind of sick conduct, llie fact that it 
was done by a handful of snot-nosed, 
pompous, spoiled brats who call 
themselves officers and gentlemen 
makes iteven more outrageous if that 
is possible. 

Former heavyweight boxing 
champion Mike Tyson went to jail 
for doing what those "gentlemen" 
didys^cept he accomplished penetia- 
tkm. Don't believe that those worked 
|up "gentlemen" wouldn't have done 
the same thing if circumstances had 
been diffierent, and it almost hsp- 
pened, according to one of the 
women who said "I believed diat I 
was going to be nped." 

The men who committed those 
obscene acts shoukl be hunted down 
and punished to the fullest extent of 
the law after they have had due proc- 
ess. That small group of misfits have 
brought disgrace upon die U.S. Navy 
and Mfffine Corps and are an embar- 
rassment to die many good and de- 
cent officen and gi^emen who 
have saved and are stiU serving dieir 
country widi disdnction. 

Presklent Budi is now personally 
involved G subject at die urging of 
Barbara) and diis is good, but I diink 
the quettion has to be put to Presklent 
Bush, himself a dive bomber pilot 
duringWorldWarII,ifinfactheever 
attended a tailhook conventicm. and 
if hedid, what kuidof conduct did die 
celebranu disiday at diat time. I 
doubt very snknisly diat diey were 
reading BiUes. 

Welcome to die real world. 



The Vh-gtaiia Beach Sun 

(tSPHCa-lM) 
13BI 



Pubbbcr 
Hinei Byeriy 



VIrgWa ■«£»,¥■. 23412 
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VBS DEADLINES 

News deadlines for The Virginia Beach Sun are: 5 p.m. Friday fOT die 
upcoming Wednesday's issue. 

• Articles must be legible, preferably typed, double spaced on standard 
aze paper. 

• Pictures must be sharp, clear and accompanied with complete informa- 
tk>n. (All persois in picture must be identified.) 

• News may be brought or mailed in and should include die name and 
lelqihone numbers of die person? submiuing it 

• The Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and encourages letters from its 
readers on lopics of general interest. 

• All leUCTS must carry the name and address of writo*. 

• Letters should be addressed to: Editor. The Virginia Bes^h Sun, 138 
Rosemont Road. Suite 209. Virginia Beach. Va. 23452. 



It was an honor to see a rainbow at night; we just 
happened to be at the right place, at the right time 



Three of us stood togedier under- 
neadi die covering 6[ die dock, 
watching the 
rain pour 
down. 

The streaks 
of lightening 
around us lit iq^ 
die sky in a dis- 
play better dian 
any Fourth of 
July show I've 
ever seen. 

It was Friday 

Slice of n'8''*- ^y 

I /«a church's single 

Life group was 

"^"■""""■" spending the 
By Mtlanit weekend at 
Broth, a Ntw- LakeOattonin 
town ana mi' North Caro- 
<Unt and profu- lina. It had 
iUmal typutUtr. been ctoudy all 
__^__i. day, and when 
die first bits of lightening started in 
the distance, a small group of us 
gathered outside to watch die storm 




comem. 

At first, we could barely see die 
light miles away, but as die storm got 
closer, big streaks of lightening 
cradted over die water. 



A rainbow at n^ht la 

one thing I never 

expected to aee. 

Something like that 

happena ao rarely 

that I feel honored 

that I would be aMe 

to aee it. 

When the rain started, everyone 
but direeof us, headed to the house to 
keep dry. 

As Uie lain got harder, dien was 
nodiingwecoulddobutwaititaut so 
we talked and listened to die "pitter 
pttiers" getting stronger. 



It was dien I kxdted across die sky 
and noticed some extra light 

It grew stronger, and we watched 
as a complete arch formed across die 
cove. Wewerewitnessingarainbow 
atnighd 

In awe, we stared at diephoiome- 
non tmtit die ran grew lighter, and 
we too dashed into the house. 

The next day, I told my friend Jon 
Cash what we saw. He is a tocal 
morning weadierman, and he ex- 
plained diat die lightning had 
probably reflected off die rain caus- 
ing a rainbow. He was so excited 
about it diat he tokl our »vxy diat 
Monday morning on Uie newi 

A ndnbow tt idghtis one dung I 
never ej^ected to see. Somediing 
like that hq>pens so rardy duit I feel 
honoieddiatlwoukibeabletoseeiL 

Tosha, Joey and I coidd have been 
insMe enjoying die warmdi of die 
house, but we would have missed a 
"once in a lifedme experience." and 
die saddling is. we would never have 
even known we had missed it 



Just A Chat 

with Duke Whiteside 



Duke WUteside is the grant administraior and coor- 
^natorfor the Portsmouth Police Department Inunsi- 
fied Drug Ef^orcement Assistance (IDEA) program. 

IDEA was recently nominated for the Governor's 
Award for Anti-Drug Efforts and the Award for Preven- 
tion Excellence, which is given by the Virgpiia Council 
on Coordinating Prevention. The decision for the 
awards' recipients will be made in October and late 
July, respectively. 

"JusttohaveusnomtnatedisanhonorinUseff." udd 
Whiteside. 

Whiteside, who joined the department in December, 
saidwhat he likes the bestiAout the program is "getting 
cititens involved directly, or pro-actively, with law 
e/forcemeia." 

Name: William B. Whit»ide. 

Nickname: Duke. 

Occupation: Grant administrator. IDEA. 

Neighborhood: Rock Deek. Virginia Beach. 

Hometown: Norfolk. 

How kmg have yon lived In Vfa-ginia Beach: Two 
years. 

Last city you lived in before moving to Virginia 
Beach: Yelkiw Knife, in nordiweA Canada. 

Age: 42. 

Marital status: Married to Carolanne for seven 
years. 

Children: Billy, 6, Cadierine. 5. Debbie. 2. Eliza- 
b^. 1 and "Guess who number five" on die way. 

What you love about your Job: Helping people. 

What yon hate about your Job: Not being dile to 
do inore. being limited by die department 

If you didn't have your current Jobi you would be 
a: Polke chief or misskmaiy pasuv somewhere. 

B^ncst accomplidimcnt in your life: My childroi. 

Secret to niccctt: Hard work and hmesty. 

If you could cbnge one aspect of your life to make 
It better, iHiat would H be: To not be such a worka- 
holic. 

What most pcopte dont know about yon Is: How 
much Icare about die citizNis in die city I work widi. 

Best personality trait: Loyalty. 

Worst personality trait: Natural cop wspkrkm diat 
coma out in me sometimes. I suqiect everybody. 

I^t peeve: Impdite peq}le. 

B^gest quirk: If I have a hard (tocision to make. I 
take a walk uound, mid I pray. 

If you had your life to live over again, what wouM 
you do differently: I wouM have become a civil rights 
attorney. 

If you w(» the kutUry, what wouM you do with die 
money: I would build a cultural coiter fo' die sts in 
Portsmoudi for minority stists and keep it running 
perpeoially. 

Pub eventag: To spend time widi my family out on 
die town. 

F^a weekend: To have friemb sid fsnily to^dier 




foracodcout 

Dream vacatkm: To take an ocean cruise to Alaska. 

Favnite magaalae; Police Chitfs Magasbu. 

I drive a: 1983 brown Ford Escort 

Dream car: An^nerican-madecv.aQubWagon 
to carry my family. 

Favorite tport Foodiall. 

Favmite spmis team: Washingttm Redskins. 

Who do you most admire: Dr. Martin Ludier King 
and Red Ckxid, an Indian chief . 

What do you like to do to relax alter a hard day's 
work: Woric in my garden. 

Your liivorite food and drink: Lobster and A and 
Wrood)eer. 

Pood you hate the moat: Calfs liver. 

Favorite flood to cook: Sweet meat, an Apache didi. 

Favorite artide of dothtog: Blue jeans. 

Favwlic t^viskm program: The Commish. 

Favorite movie: Hunt for Red Ocu>ber. 

FBvmrite type of music: QMpeL 

The happlot time in your life, so fkr: The past 
seven years. 

If you wtr* to become fhmous, iriut woukl you 
want to be AuBons fi>r: Hearing odiers. 

What is the most (ba time you have had In the past 
week: Our "Family EHiy" on Sunday. 

If you cooU pidc Ji^ two of the foUowing, which 
would you pidt: brafao, looks, a good personality mr 
money? Brains aid a good personalty. 

What do.you think ta one of the b^est problems 
facing the wotU: Poverty and starvatkm. 

What do yon think b one of the b^est problems 
faring Virgfaita Beach: It's unoontrolkd growdi. 

What do yon Mke most ahmt Vb-glnia Beach: The 
Oceanfront 

If you couM spoMl 10 nlnntcs alone with the 
Prcshknt George Bush, what would you talk 
about?: Seltiiv some knid (rf'dome^c agenda to mito 
America betm. 




Goklfarb 



Off The Record 

Getting a maid 
helps man through 
his mid-life crisis 

By GREG GOLDFARB 
Virginia Beach Sun Managing Edtor 
■ f 
After trying to suppress and dis- 
guise it for years, it's no use. I give 
up. It's higga dian I. and I will have 
to deal widi it I've finally told my 
family, friends, publi^er. uid now 
it's time to tell die 
world. Yes. I am 
experiencing my 
interpretation of 
MLC - "midlife 
crisis" and have 
been going 
through it for 
about Ave years. 
MLC also stands 
tot. "Mentally 
Losing Control." 
The interesting 
tiling, however, is 
diat I actually feel stronger physi- 
cally, ^iritually and mentally dian 
ever. 

Pick me no flowos. send me no 
sympadiy cards, say me no prayers, 
sing me no songs, spatt me your 
speeches. 1 am solid and stable. I am 
one. Widi maturity comes wisdom. 
Widi wisdom comes undostanding. 
Widi too much undostanding, how- 
ever, can come a nervous breidcdown. 
For some. Not 1. 1 take stock in life's 
various phases and conskler my MLC 
character-building. In Cict, my cur- 
rent cerebral preoccupations call me 
back to my college days and seme of 
my persoiial {Aikisophies whkdi car- 
ried roe dirough: Be yoursdf; and 
don't chttige fa anycme. 

Yes. it is I who gaze into my future 
and mutt decide its fate. And while 
tonight my mind shoidd be filled widi 
dwughts about die Olympic Dream 
Team, national polittes. Supreme 
Court decisions and world peace - 
and it always is - 1 also look around 
me and see odier areas of life to 
which I haven't paid sufficient atten- 
tion recendy. So inunediate actkm 
has be«i taken. One more trip to die 
dentist and my teedi will be aJl right 
I have contented myself diat I am 
relatively happy widi die shape my 
body is in for the shape it!s in, so 1 
will not diink about it - just a litUe 
ninning. push-ups and crunches for 
die rest itf my life. 

There is. however, one ddngdiat I 
dwuld have been doii^ for years, 
and dut is, keeping a dean house. 
But hey, I'm a l»chek)r. not a domes- 
tic servant 

It's not dut I don't like deanli- 
ness. I do, very much. I keep myself 
veryclean.But,hitchhikingonahabit 
devetoped tiiet moving from resi- 
dence to residence in die late ' 70s and 
dirough the '80s, in my own mind, I 
was never in one place long oiough 
to have to clean die tub bdcne I 
moved. But now, for example, I've 
been in my place for almost diree 
yean. It had become dirty, evoi after 
making some half-hearted attempts 
at cleaning it from time to time. But 
all dut's over. I've brought in a pro- 
fessional once a mondi - a maid - and 
I already feel better about my MLC. 
Alkiw me now to report diatmybadi- 
baduoom tub «id sink are blue. The 
fkxir and shower walls are white. I'm 
not kidding. My kitchra sink - white. 
Counter ic^ - white a^nl My fiimi- 
bire • actual wood, not dust Hbn- 
esdy. My caipef - not brown, but 
golden. My stove - Imwn. Rims 
around my twmers - shiny. And 
miracles of miracles - my 
microwave's interior is pale yellow • 
not black, brown and red. It's amaz- 
ing what a focused house clesMr can 
do in a day - and it's not diat expen- 
sive for what you getinrebimfordie 
money. 

I must say diat dealing widi MLC 
can be trying, paitk:ulariy if it hiu 
you all at once. Mine has been kind to 
me, waiting untU I was ready to deal 
nonchalaidy widi it But I do vow to 
. . . not conform anymore dian I want 
to to "mainstream" soctety or itt ex- 
pec tations; always be dipkMnatic and 
pacious, as needed: grow iq); write 
books and play« be successAil, yes. 
butdottyourownway; cooiribtdeto 
die world's benity and bettoment 
but don't worry about how fast you 
fill your pockets widi cash; dirow 
away my answering machine: take 
(town my Gndy Crawfnxl cal«idar 
from my living room; not ovoana- 
lyze and overthink siniatims and 
deciskms; forget die gym - dne's too 
much odier stuff to do. 

Sure. Not everyone will agree widi 
mt. But it's fuimy, it seems diat after 
each birthday, in some ways, what 
odier pec^le diiidc matters to memore 
diui ever, in odier ways, I coukl care 
less because I woulcbi't trade places 
widi an^xw in die world. 

Now dut I've dirown diis off my 
chest in die future we'll get bade to 
basics - luskMball Hid politics. I'm 
ready. 



Virginia Beacli 
wins national 
livability award 



I have just returned fipom 
Houston v/hett I attended the U.S. 
Confoence of Mayors meeting. On 
Monday, June 22, 1 was honwed to 
receive a first place Livability 
Award for the city of Virginia 
Beach. 




the C.AJR£. committee, was 
created in November of 1990 to 
complement the efforts of commu- 
nity policing. The committee is 
composed of representatives &om 
the city's human service depart- 
ments as well as police, pailcs and 
recreation, pubUc schools, libraries, 
fire prevention and juvenile 
probation. 

C.A.R.E. stands fw Community 
Action Resource Empowerment. 
The goals of the C.A.R£. commit- 
tee are to provide for community 
rehabilitation through community 
policing and community-based 
human service programming. 
Long-term goals are to provide pre- 
vention programming, strengthen 
community associations, create 
community pride and citizen 
empowerment 

Thirteen communities in Virginia 
Beach have been identified as high- 
risk areas, based on crime statistics 
and characteristics of social dys- 
function. So far, community 
policing initiatives have been 
implemented in five of these 
communities. The long-tenn goal is 
to reach all thirteen. 

Community policing is a new 
trend in cities across the nation, 
where officers are put on the streets 
so they can get to know the neigh- 
borhoods they protect It is based 
on the belief that problems can best 
be identified and resolved by the 
officer on patrol. These officers are 
more aware of the nature of 
citizens' problems and how to 
r^lve them. This innovative type 
of law enlorcement promotes 
cocqmation between the commu- 
nity and the police to solve prob- 
lems and concerns in the neighbor- 
hood. Residents are participating in 
crime prevention. Streets and prop- 
erties are being cleaned up and rid- 
ded of drug dealers. 

Aft»r the streets have been made 
safe by the police, the C.A.R.E. 
committee enters a targeted neigh- 
borhood and conducts a door-to- 
door survey. The surveys thus far 
have revealed that citizens are 
concerned about the condition of 
their neighborhood and that they 
are willing to get involved in 
helping to improve their quality of 
life. They listed concerns such as 
crime, drug abuse, unonployment 
and substandard housing. 

After the survey is conducted and 
results tabulated, the C.A.R£. 
committee holds a human services 



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C.A.R.E. tg the an- 
swer to rehabilitating 
high-risk neighbor- 
hoods. As we restore 
a communitjr's confi- 
dence, we also re- 
store their desiye to 
change things from 
within. 



fair in the community. This fair is 
an effort to bring families togetho- 
for fun and fellowship. Re|xesenta- 
tives from city agencies are 
available to answer questions. 

After the fair, the C.A.R.E. com- 
mittee begins to saturate the com- 
munity with opportunities for 
substance abuse prevention 
services, recreation, education, 
housing preservation and health 
services. C.A.R.E. acts as a 
resource in supplying the sovices 
needed to assist the residents. 

As a result of this coordinated ef- 
fort, Neighb(vhood Watch pro- 
grams have been established. 
Clean-ups have improved the 
appearance of the community. 
Youth services have been greatly 
enhanced. Neighborhood fairs to 
promote fellowship and bring 
families together are now an annual 
event Lighting and housing 
conditions have been upgraded. 
The residents are proud of their 
communities and their accomplish- 
ments. Families are enjoying an 
enhanced quality of life. 

The C.A.R.E. committee helps to 
create a strong community associa- 
tion. All five communities now 
being served by C.A.R.E. have 
community associations that are 
highly organized and meet on a 
regular basis to solve problems, 
discuss community needs and 
decide how to meet those needs. A 
strong community association also 
ensures that the services delivered 
are based on what the entire 
community wants. They also help 
educate the community on the 
types of services jvailable and 
when and where to access them. 
Residents are now directly involved 
in developing their own activities. 

Representatives of C.AJI.E. 
meet once a month to discuss 
community needs, share successes 
and coordinate services being 
delivered. The joint partnership 
between the residents, community 
police and the C.A.R.E. committee 

D Sm aiY, Pag* 10 




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Our subversive declaration 




On Saturday, the Fourth of July, 
there will be celebrations nation- 
wide honoring our Declaration of 
Independence. In addition to ball 
games, car races, beach parties, 
backyard barbecues, parades, con- 
certs and fireworks, there will be one 
very special event in our area. 
That is the day set for the commis- 
sioning of the 
Navy's newest 
nuclear aircraft 
carrier, which 
will then join 
the fleet as the 
USS George 
Washington 
(CVN73)with 
the appropriate 
motto - "Spirit 
of Freedom." 

Americans 
know that the 
4thof July isa 
day to cele- 
brate our free- 
dom, but there 
are many mis- 
conceptions 
concerning the 
significance of 
■ the date. The 

motion for independence, intro- 
duced by Richard Henry Lee in June 
1776, was actually adopted by the 
Continental Congress on the 2nd of 
July, which John Adams predicted 
would be the day of celebration. But 
the final draft of the fuller declara- 
tion by Thomas Jefferson was not 
ai^roved until two days later. 

Many Americans assume errone- 
ously that on the 4th of July, 1776, 
the Declaration of Independence 
was unanimously signed by the dele- 
gates. In fact, no delegates signed the 
document that day. It was August 



This rebelliotts Decla- 
ration boldly pro- 
claimg that when a 
government ^ores 

the limitations 
placed upon it and 
destroys individual 
rights, the people 
have not only a 
right, but a duty, to 
rebel against it and 
to replace it with a 



Lil's 
Quill 



Lillian Youell, 
board member, 
Virginia Consor- 
tium for Law-Re- 
lated Education. 



new government 

built upon a more 

secure constitutional 

foundation. 



before most had signed, and one did 
not attach his name until 1781! 

Jefferson was only 33 when he 
penned the words that would signify 
the end of British America. It took 
him two weeks to write on of 
history's most celebrated composi- 
tions and our most famous founding 
documenL The Declaration can not 
be considered an official state paper 
of the government of the United 
States because no such nation ex- 
isted in 1776. 

Although often termed astatement 
of American rights, it does not spec- 
ify civil liberties. Instead, Jefferson 
enumerates grievances which the 
American colonists had against the 
British king. Some of those griev- 



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ances, which appear later in the U.S. 
Constitution, express restrictions 
upon the power of government. 

Historian and author, Henry Steele 
Commagcr, asserted, "The Declara- 
tion of Independence has some claim 
to be considered the most subversive 
document of modem history." 

Explaining this shocking state- 
ment, he continued, "Consider how 
explosive are its principles, if they 
are to be taken seriously: all men are 
created equal; all have the right to 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happi- 
ness; the purpose of government is to 
secure these rights; men have a right 
to overthrow existing governments 
and make new governments!" 

This rebellious Declaration boldly 
proclaims that when a government 
ignores the limitations placed upon it 
and destroys individual rights, the 
people have not only a right, but a 
duty , to rebel against it and to replace 
it with a new government built upon 
a more secure constitutional founda- 
tion. 

Jefferson believed in what he 
wrote. "I hold it, that a little rebellion, 
now and then, is a good thing, and as 
necessary in the political world as 
storms in the physical . . ." 



ROWS to meet 

The Retired Officers' Wives 
Society of Tidewater will hold a 
luncheon on Thursday, July 9 at 
11:15 a.m. at the Radissan Hotel in 
Virginia Beach. 



Virginia Beach Sun, Wt 'In esday. July 1 , 1992 3 

Fathers are 
Important to 
family unit 

During the weekend surrounding 
Father's Day there were many 
newspaper articles related to fathers 
and the role they play in the family 
structure. 

Most of these were "good news" 
stories that we could identify with 
and enjoy 
reading. But 
buried deeper 
in the papers 
were articles 
that contained 
statistics that 
should alarm 
us. Statistics 
that show how 
important both 
parents are to 
the nurturing 
and raising of 
children. 

Secretary of 
Health and 
Human Serv- 
ices Louis Sul- 
livan says that 
of all juveniles 
I— .^_^__ currently serv- 
ing in long-term correctional facili- 
ties, 70 percent did not live with 
their fattiers while growing up. 
Does not living with a father cause 
juvenile crime? Absolutely not, but 
it does show that something was 
missing in the child's life and the 
substitution of drugs, abusive 
behavior and/or gang activity led to 
bigger problems, not answers. Even 
sadder is that many of the.se 
juveniles will become long-term 
clients of the correctional system. 

Maybe togethe r we 
can find solutions 




The VBEA 
Report 

Cheryll L. To- 
hoc, president of 
the Virginia 
Beach Education 
Association. 



before today's y oung 
children become part 
of tomorrow's juve- 
nile crime statistics. 



Another report on family unity 
notes that a white child bom today 
has roughly one chance in two of 
living continuously with a biologi- 
cal father through age 18. A black 
child has roughly one chance in 12. 
Add to this the statistics that 35 
percent of all children now live 
apart from their biological fathers 
and one begins to wonder what we 
can do to keep these kids from be- 
coming part of the statistics we see 
with the juvenile crime figures. 

Since education is VBEA's busi- 
ness we tend to think that surely 

D S«« FATHERS. Pags 10 



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Ebchlbitlon at the Wakefield Foun- 
dation, Inc.. Center for the Arts 
JULY2-30. 1992. Opening recep- 
tion July 2. 1992 from 7:30 to 
9:00 p.m. at the Center for the 
Arts. 100 Wilson Avenue, Wake- 
field, Virginia. The public Is cor- 
dially Invited to attend at no cost. 
Included In the exhibit are works 
In watercolor. acrylic and oil rang- 
ing from marine scenes, land- 
scapes, and wildlife to portraits 
and prints. Gallery hours are 2:00 
to 5:00 p.m. Wednesday through 
Sunday. 



HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



n New Subiscription Q Renewal 

Please nfiail this coupon with your check to; 

SUN, 136 S. Rosemont Rd., Virginia Beach, VA 23452 

RATES: Within 40 miles of Virginia Beach: 

Q One year $14.95 □ Two years $24.50 

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□ One year $16.85 □ Two years $29.50 

All other states: 

D One year $22.00 LJ Two years $34.50 



Name- 



Address 
City 



State . 



Zip. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
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4 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 1. 1992 




Fourth of July celebrations to be held throughout the a^ea 



The 12th annual Fourth of July 
party at Lakeside Park in 
Chesapeake oncers plenty of fun 
for the entire family. Ent^tain- 
ment begins at 10 a.in. and contin- 
ues until about S p.ni.. with per- 
formances by Pump, the Nashville 
Connection, the Red Coats. Ver- 
tigo, High Tied. The Chesapeake 
Bay Cloggers and more. 

Children's activities include face 
painting, a petting zoo and games. 
Food concessions will also be of- 
foed. 

Shuttle parking is available at 
Oscar Smith High School and 
Raleigh Heights Baptist Church. 



No parking is permitted on site ex- 
cept for handicapped. 

This event is sponsored by the 
South Norfolk Qvic Leape. the 
South Norfolk Ruritan Club, the 
Chesapeake Sheriff's Department, 
the Double Deuce and the city's 
Parks, Recreation and Building 
Maintenance Department. 

Mount Trashmore in Vir- 
ginia Beach will be the site of 
the 19th annual Family Fun Day. 
Family Fun Day will provide 
activities for children, musical en- 
tertainment and fireworks, as well 
as a place for families to picnic and 



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have fun. 

Games and activities for children, 
ranging from Soccer Kick 'n Scwe 
to Giant Bubble Making will begin 
in the park at 3 p.m. Each activity 
gives family members a chance to 
combine skills to achieve^ the 
game's objective. 

Entertainment on the main stage 
will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the 
rock and ro|l band "Aces Up,** and 
conclude at 9:30 p.m. with the Star 
Spangled Banner and a Hreworks 
display. 

Local radio station 106.9 "The 
Fox" is a major sponsor of the 
event this year and will broadcast 
live from the paiic. 

Attendance at Family Fun Day 
last year was approximately 
67.000, combining both day and 
evening participants. In 1976, dur- 
ing the nation's Bicentennial, a 
crowd of more than 100,000 was 
recorded. 

In keeping with the title of the 
event, no alcohol is sold or allowed 
at die site. 



Portsmouth's 4th of July 
celebration will once again Iving 
about a variety of fun activities, 
entertainment and q)ecial events bx 
the entire family. As always, the 
main attraction this year «dU the 
fireworks display over the Elizabeth 
River. All events will take place 
on PcHtanouth's waterfront 

The Naval Amphibious 
Base Little Creek will host a 
fun-niled day of activities on 
Saturday, July 4 fircmi noon until 2 
a.m. at Observation Point and the 
NAVPHIBASE Beach (across from 
the Golf Course). This fabulous 
Fourth of July Festival is opta to 
the public wiA free admisaon and 
parking. 

Several activities will take place 
throughout the day including a 10- 
ride carnival with games and prizes. 
Softball tournament, talent contest, 
4-man beach volleyball tournament 
and super sloppy double dare obsta- 
cle course. Local food and beverage 
vendors will be on site to satisfy 



appetites of all ages. Entertainment 
will begin on the beach at 4 p.m. 
featuring live music by The Rhm- 
dels and Uberation. 

The Fourth of July finale will 
feature Bay Bash at its best with the 
kicking sounds of The Bmieshidcers 
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. In addition, 
an adult super sloppy double dare 
obstacle course, beach volleyball 
and vetero barfly will be available 
to Bay Bashers. 

The Francb Land House in 
Virginia Beach will celetoate the 
birthday of our country with a grand 
18th-century style celebration oa 



Saturday, July 4 from noon to S 
p.m. 

Thrill to the sight of Signora 
Bella, the Equilibrist, as she bal- 
ances fearlessly on die slack wire, 
relive the exciting capture and 
demise of the hrartless pirate 
Blackbeard at the 18ih-caihiry piq>- 
pet theater, and drill with the mili- 
tia captain and drummer. 

Eighteendi cenbuy entotainment 
will be provided by Historical Di- 
versions. Enjoy craft demonstra- 
tions, music and colonial games. 
Escape widi our storyteUer as she 
weaves tales oLscaiecrows. 



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All-American Celebration 
set for Julv 4 at the beach 



By APRIL O'BRIEN 
Special to The Vkginia Beach Sun 

The Oceanfront will sparkle with 
more than fireworks on Saturday, 
the 4th of July with the All- 
American Celebration, including 
the Ms. ECSC Pageant finals and 
musical entertainment. 

All of this can be found in 24th 
Street Park from noon until the 
fireworks light up the sky at 9:30 
p.m. off the 15th Street Pier. 

The entertainment is free and 
open to the public. 

The Miss ECSC Pageant finals, 
sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Jaycees, will occur on the 24th 
Street Stage from 12 to 3 p.m., 
with live music by The Hazzards. 
Ms. ECSC and her court, selected 
for their poise, personality and that 
certain "beach look," will serve to 
promote the upcoming 30th Annual 
East Coast Surfing Championships 
(ECSC) from August 28 through 
30. 

The 12 contestants, chosen in 
preliminaries at Peabody's, will 
compete for cash and prizes includ- 
ing $500 in cash and a year mem- 
bership at a health club for Ms. 



\u-^. 



ECSC, custom-made swimwear 
from Meg's Swimwear, plus three- 
month memberships from a health 
club for runners up. Ms. ECSC and 
her court will also have a chance to 
be seen on the "Bikini Open" pay- 
per-view television program sched- 
uled to videotape at the ECSC. 

Musical entertainment continues 
throughout the day on the 24th 
Street Stage with Savannah playing 



from 3:30 to 5:45 p.m., followed 
by Motown music masters. The 
Platters from 6:45 to 9:15 p.m. 
Then fireworks explode in the night 
sky to close the day-long celebra- 
tion in style. 

The July 4th All-American Cele- 
bration is produced by Ocean Occa- 
sions and sponsored by 2WD Radio 
and Pepsi. For more information 
call 498-0215. 




Elizabeth Upson and 
check-In her crafts. 



Kathleen James help a senior citizen 



Sugar Plum Tree show slated 



Chamber to host Dorcas Helfant 



Dorcas Helfant, president of the 
National Association of Realtors, 
will be the featured speaker at the 
next Beach Briefs breakfast forum. 
Monday, July 13 at 7:45 a.m. at 
The Omni- Virginia Beach on Bon- 
ney Road. 

Helfant will be addressing the 
current economic state of the hous- 
ing industry, both locally and na- 
tionally. 



Beach Briefs is a quarterly break- 
fast meeting hosted by the Hamp- 
ton Roads Chamber of Commerce- 
Virginia Beach. The cost for the 
breakfast is $10 per person for 
chamber members and $15 for 
nonmembers; reservations are re- 
quired. 

For further information or reser- 
vations call Lisa 'Burris at the 
chamber 490-1223. 



D Contlnuad From Paga 1' 

restores antique dolls. 

"She will buy them and clean 
them up and make new clothes for 
them. People always love them," 
she said. "I think she finds them at 
flea markets. They're just very 
beautiful and very popular widi 
people who like to collect them." 

There are so many 

crafts, that types and prices vary 
greatly. Seniors price their own 
items when they are brought in to 
the club before the sale. 



- HERE'S TO YOU _ 

America 



"They set their own prices. 
They're usually good prices," said 

"(We have) gevcral 
retired men doing 
some beautiful wood- 
work and small furni- 
ture. A lot of them 
have workshops set 
up in their garage 
and they enjoy doing 
it." 

Dorothn Travb, Cape Henry 
Womant Club apokeaperson 



Henderson assumes command of Ft. Story's 11th Transportation Battalion; 
Kenney assigned duties of Director of Personnel Proponency at Ft. Lee, Va. 



By LIBBY ALFRIEND 
Special to The Virginia Beach Sun 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert F. 
Kenney, Jr., recently relinquished 
command of the 1 1 th Transportation 
Battalion (Terminal) to Lieutenant 
Cotonel Mark Henderson in a change 
of command 
ceremony at the 
Fort Story post 
parade field. 

Kenney.^- 
sumed , com- 
mand of the 11 th 
Transportation 
Battalion June 
18. 1990. 
Within months 
of assuming 
command, LTC 
Kenney de- 
ployed half of his battalion (two 
companies and. to detachments) to 
Southwest Asia in support of Opera- 
tions Desert Shield and Desert Storm. 




Kenney 



The remainder of the battalion, in 
addition to constantly preparing to 
deploy, provided stateside support 
for operations in the Persian Gulf. 

Responsible for the Port Support 
Activity (PSA) at Newport News 
Marine Terminal from November27, 
1990 through January 4, 1991, the 
battalion successfully prepared and 
loaded eight merchant breakbulk 
vessels, 23 barges and 40 railcars, 
representing 2,617 pieces of equip- 
ment without accident or incident. 

The 1 1 th Battalion also augmented 
the Norfolk Naval Air Station, Mili- 
tary Airlift Command Terminal with 
personnel to support a joint operation 
which received 5,621 aircraft, proc- 
essed 88,890 passengers and pallet- 
ized approximately 35,000 tons of 
cargo. The Battalion simultaneously 
operated the Departure Airfield 
Control Group (DACG) at Langley 
Air Force Base. During the period 
September 10, 1990 to March 8, 199 1 , 



the DACG processed 1 12 aircraft, 7. 
187 passengers, 330 pallets of cargo 
and loaded 367 wheeled vehicles. 

With the cease fire, the 

mission changed to an Arrival Air- 
field Coitrol Group and received 51 
aircraft, 3,439 
passengers. 301 
pallets and 223 
pieces of rolling 
stork. LTC 
Kenney served 
as the Joint 
Logistics-Over- 
The-ShoreTask 
Force Com- 
mander for Dis- 
play Determina- 
tion 1991, con- 
sisting of over 
1,500 personnel 




Henderson 
representing the 



Army, Navy and the Marine Corps. 

He was a strong supporter of many 

community and civic events such as 

the American Red Cross Blood 



Drives, numerous parades and civic 
functions and most notably the suc- 
cessful affiliation with John B. Dey 
Elementary School, as a part of the 
Virginia Beach Adopt- A-School pro- 
gram , represented the Army and Fort 
Story as a special guest speaker at 
numerous local functions and sup- 
ported the local chapters of the Asso- 
ciation of the United States Army 
and the National Defense Transpor- 
tation Association. He is vice presi- 
dentofthe William and Mary Alumni 
Association. 

LTC Kenney's next assignment 
will be as the Director of Personnel 
Proponency.Multi-functional Logis- 
tics, CASCOM, Fort Lee, Virginia. 

Lieutenant Colonel Mark Hender- 
son comes to the 1 1 th Transportation 
Battalion (Terminal) from the Strate- 
gic Mobility Division, Office of the 
Deputy Chief of Staff of Logistics. 
Alexandria, Va. 



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Traub. "We get a lot of pillows and 
toys. Some of the toys are a few 
dollars, but maybe $125 to $150 
for a king-size quilt But the prices 
are very good for the items they 
bring in. They seem to price them 
to sell." 

Many of the seniors work year- 
round creating crafts for the show, 
particularly blankets and crocheted 
or knit items. The average age of 
crafters is 60- to 70-years-old. She 
said many participants count on 
this money from the Sugar Plum 
Tree as extra income or to fund 
materials to make more items. 

"After we close on the four- 
teenth," said Traub, "they come 
back on the sixteenth to pick up 
their checks. Most of them are so 
thrilled with the project. Most of 
them are so happy that we're selling 
things for them." 

Traub said this is the most 
popular service project among the 
Cape Henry Woman's Club's 113 
members. 

"I think we enjoy the project. 1 
think we probably get more out of 
it than the people who bring in 
their things," she said. "It's one of 
the most popular projects." 

About 60 to 70 club members 
help with the project, whether it is 
working at the Sugar Plum Tree or 
doing publicity for it. 

Traub said the club breaks even 
on the project and sometimes 
charges a small fee, less than $5 
from seniors who sold several hun- 
dred dollars worth of merchandise, 
and collect nothing from those 
whose profits are less than $50. 
This helps the club absorb some of 
the cost of planning and running 
the fair. 

"For a couple hundred dollars, we 
can get the things we need - pens, 
scissors, tags, (ape . . . ," she said. 
"I guess you don't think iibout the 
hidden cosL" 

Traub said that the craft sale has 
changed considerably over the years. 
In 1973 the sales totaled $3,000, 
and the Sugar Plum Tree was held 
at the Oceanfront to target tourists. 
Over the years, the sale has grown, 
and has gradually moved away from 
the Oceanfront to larger indoor 
places that can be used for little 
cost Exact figures, however, were 
not available. 

The Virginia Beach Department 
of Parks and Recreation, which co- 
sponsors the event, helped arrange 
for use of the school. 

An afghan raffle will be held at 
the Sugar Plum Tree (o go towards 
the school's scholarship fund. 

For more information on the 
Sugar Plum Tree call Traub at 340- 
9056. 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 1. 1992 S 

Do's 

and 

donTs 

. Q Contlnuad From Pag* 1 



"What's the point? Most guys go 
twice, and they get slopped. What's 
the point? I mean. Atlantic Avenue 
is the biggest main place to go." 

Sonmez said that restricting 
cruising and skateboarding, among 
other rules, takes away their fun. 

"1 don't think they should have as 
many restrictions. It's not as fun. 
You get bored. We can't do any- 
thing much because of all these re- 
strictions." 

What do the girls do 

for fun? 

"We go lay out on the beach and 
then we go walking, and sit on this 
bench. This is, like, our bench," 
said Beck, tapping a teak bench near 
21st Street on Atlantic Avenue. 

Angic Zehmer, 20, a Great Neck 
area resident, said that while some 
people disagree with recent limita- 
tions, she said that the new cruising 
ordinance and skateboarding resOic- 
tions help make for less traffic and 
more safety along Atlantic Avenue. 

"I like that there's no cruising, 
because it took me 30 minutes to 
go three blocks one day when I was 
trying to go to work, and it made 
J me 20 minutes late," said Zehmer, 
' who works at a store at the comer 
of 20th Street and Atlantic Avenue. 

Zehmer said that she still sees 
the same guys "cruising the strip," 
however, because the same ones 
whistle every lime they drive by. 
She said she does feel bad for some 
of the tourists, though. 

"I feel sorry for the tourists who 
come down to the beach, because 
there's nothing to do and they just 
drive around," Zehmer said. "I feel 
sorry for them, but I like the law 
because it cuts down on traffic, 
from what I can see." 

Zehmer said she is also pleased 
with the added number of police at 
the Oceanfront 

'This is the first year I've seen a 
cop on every street comer - on ev- 
ery block. I think it does help, be- 
cause of the city's past. I think it's 
good that the cops stay out here a 
lot" she said. 

What's the one ordinance she's 
not too sure about? Skateboarding 
restrictions that prohibit it on the 
sidewalk and boardwalk. 

"A lot of my friends skateboard, 
and they don't like die new mles," 
she said. "They hate it." 

New exhibition at 
Artists at Work studio 

By CONSTANCE FAHEY 

Special to The Virginia Beach Sun 

"Reflections at the Edge of the 
Sea," a multi-media exhibition of 
fine art focuses on the colors, 
brightness and enjoyment of the 
summer season, and displays works 
by 32 local artists from Artists at 
Work: Gallery and Studios. 

This shimmering, summer exhi- 
bition opens on July 1, 1992 and 
continues through September 30. 

The exhibition is free and open to 
the public. 

Artists at Work: Gallery and 
Studios is a non-profit collaborative 
of resident and exhibiting artists. 
It's open Tuesday through Saturday 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and by ap- 
pointment 

Call 425-6671 or 428-2324 for 
information. 



PO wives to meet 

The LitUe Creek Chief Petty Of- 
ficers' Wives Club will meet on 
Wednesday, July 8 at 7:30 p.m. at 
the U.S. Naval Amphibious Base 
CPO Club. 

Wives and widows of E-7, E-8 
and E-9, pay grades, either active or 
retired, all branches of the military 
service, stationed or living in the 
Tidewater area are invited to attend. 

Call Jackie 497-6599 or Ellie 
499-2187 for more information. 



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< VfagiiM Beach Sun. Wednwday. July 1. 1992 

Being there for 
each other helps 
build family ties 



John Wareing has 
7 children; shares 
some personal insights 

By M J. RICHARDS 
Virgiinia Beach Sun Staff Writer 

As large families become mote 
and more rare in today's society, 
some Virginia Beach residents 
might wonder what it would be like 
to be in a large family that is still 
close. 

John Wareing, 71, is still close 
with his four sons and three daugh- 
ters, who range in age ^m 32 to 
44. 

He said that there is one key to 
beging the successful i»rent of a 
large &mily. 

"Just be there. That's probably 
the most important thing," said 
Wareing. "It's to be there when 
they make a mistake and fall down. 
To be there, and they know you're 
there, is the key to success, and 
that's voy important." 

A former professional boxer, 
Wareing started his own gym, as a 
business, at the Oceanfiront when 
his children were v^ litUe. 

Although he spent much of his 
time at the gym working, he spent 
the rest of his time at home with 
his children: Candy, Sandy, Bob. 
Patty, Mike, Jack and Tony. 

"It was such a large family that 
we always did things together," said 
Mike, 3i8, the third youngest. "My 
time akme with my father was very 
little. With seven kids, he couldn't 
be atone with just one of us." 

But that doesn't seem to bother 
any of the Wareings, who are now 
all grown up and live in different 
sections of the Beach. Their parents 
divOTced nearly 20 years ago, but 
the children are still ck)se to them. 

"When we were growing up and I 
was little, when he had a day off, he 
always took us walking in the 
woods or doing fun things," said 
PaUy Wareing, 39, the youngest 
daughter. "Even if it was just set- 
ting up tag-team matches, he al- 
ways spent a lot of time with us, 
whenever he had time off." 

Tony Wareing, 32, the youngest, 
said spending time with his father 
when he was growing up gave him 
the chance to learn many things. 

"He's probably already forgotten 
everything I ever learned," said 
Tony. "There's so much to be 
learned from the guy ... the best 
thing I learned from him is com- 
munication." 

Sandy Wareing, 42, the second- 
oldest, said her father is a great 
omimunicator, and she thinks that 
all of her brothns and sisters have 
learned their father's ability to un- 
derstand peq)le. 

What she admires the most about 



her father is how he relates to peo- 
ple. 

"His way with pe<q>le, his un(kr- 
stuidihg of people - like the minute 
someone walks in. he can tell what 
aperson is made of and what they're 
thinking." she m± 

Sandy said this talent helped to 
teach her and her siblings a dihioent 
perqjective of peq>le. 

"He's the one and only." said 
Patty. "From the time I was a kid, 
it always impressed me that every- 
body loved him. He had friends 
from all walks of life." 

Jack Wareing, 34, the 

second-youngest, said his father has 
a knack for motivating people, 
which is what he admires the most 
about him. ** 



"If you've got seven 
children who are full 
of ambttion, it's re- 
ally not that dlffl- 
cult. They're self- 
siifBcient, they know 
what they need, and 
Fm fortunate they all 

know pretty much 
where they're gohig." 

John Waning, father 
iffaeoen children 




From left, Bob, Jack, John, Tony and Mike Wareing take a 
break from working out at the gym. 



Tony also described his father as 
someone who is an overachiever 
and always wants to be involved. 

When John Wareing 

retired from Wareing's Gym, 
which his sons now run on 19th 
Street, about 10 years ago, Tony 
said he was retired for three ot four 
days bef(He he started getting rest- 
less. Shortly after that, he began 
woiking for the Virginia Beach Po- 
lice Department training academy 
recruits. 

"He's 71-years-old," said Jack. 
"He still hits the iron every day and 
works out every day ... He's so 
vivacious. That really is very mo- 
tivational." 



Sandy described her fadier as her 
"wikl, passionate, crazy side," whUe 
her mother was more of a gentle 
strength. 5he said that all seven 
Wareing children are some type of 
ooss between the two. 

John said that as a father, raising 
his family was not altogether diffi- 
cult, and he is pleased with the re- 
sults. 

"If you've got seven childroi who 
are full of ambition, it's really not 
that difficult," said John. "They're 
self-sufficknt, they know what diey 
need, and I'm fortunate they all 
know pretty much where they're 
going." 



Lotus lunclieon in Sandbridge 



"He's a good motivator and a 
good leader in general," Jack said. 
"He's funny, too, which is impor- 
tant" 

To Patty, her father's sense of 
humor has helped her in raising her 
own six children, including two 
that are adopted. 

"I think that having kids is the 
biggest thing that binds us to- 
gether," said Patty. "We laughed a 
lot. We always joked a lot We 
couldn't get together without 
laughing a lot. We've had our 
moments, but we always try to 
have fun. My kids, are the same 
way." 

Mike Wareing said that his fa- 
thw's consistency in leading by ex- 
ample is what has helped him in 
raising his son. 

"I have a son of my own that's 
the same age difference to myself as 
my father is to me," he said. "He 
did a fine job raising me, and I 
think I turned out ok. I think I try 
to use the same consistency." 

Tony said his father's way of 
leading by example always had an 
impact on him. 

"He's not phoney baloney," said 
Tony. "He's a straight shooter. I 
admire that he doesn't pull any 
puiKhes. He doesn't conform. He 
does everything the right way." 



ByGAPHREDJ.EVANS 
Special to The Virginia Beach Sun 

The annual Lotus Festival will 
be celebrated this year, even though 
there are no lotus blooming in the 
pond or in Ashby Creek. 

We don't sponsor the beautiful 
ball with a queen and one of the big 
bands at the Cavalier Beach Club 
like we used to. But we will be at- 
tending the lovely luncheon put on 
by the ladies of the Tabernacle 
Methodist Church at the church 
across Sandbridge Road from the 
Lotus Gardens. It will be held as 
usual on the third Wednesday of 
July this year, falling on July IS, 
1992. 

But thereis hope for the lotus in 
the Lotus Gardens on Sandbridge 
Road which are owned by the Cape 
Henry Woman's Club. The mem- 
bers of the Back Bay Restoration 
Foundation have already trans- 
planted some lotus plants from 
Stumpy Lake. They are working on 
stabilization of the eroding shore- 
line. And they have already planted 
a lot of Crape Myrtles and some 
native Bald Cypress trees! We are 
so excited that they have adopted 
our Lotus Gardens as their part in 

Single parents' 
July 4 bash set 

5inge Parents of Virginia BeiK;h, 
PWP, Chapter 216, will hold a 
July 4 family picnic from 11 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. at Red Wing Park, shelter 

Cost is $2 for nonmembers; $1 
for members. 
The public is invited. 



the city's Adopt a Waterway pro- 
gram^ _^ 

i Public Nolice 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 29lh day of JUNE, 
1992. 

Billy Wayne Wallace. Jr. Plain- 
tiff, against Donna Darlene Dillon 
Wallace. Defendant 

Docket #CH92-I378 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo mab'imonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds of one 
year separation. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defendant is 
not a resident of the State of Vir- 
ginia, the last known post office 
address being P.O. Box 701. Cot- 
ton Valley, LA. It is ordered that 
Donna Darlene Dillon Wallace do 
appear on or before the 19th of Au- 
gust, 1992, md do what may be 
necessary to protect her interest in 
this suit. 

It is further Ordered that a copy of 
this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy— Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Raymond J. Bjorkman, D.C. 

LeeAnn N. Barnes, p.q. 

1 1101 Warwick Boulevard 

Newport News, Virginia 23601 

27-7 
4t7-22VBS 

I PubHc Nollcft I 

Pabiic Auction Sale 



Under the authority in Internal 
Revenue Code section 6331, the 
ptopetty described Iwlow has been 
seized for nonpayment of internal 
revenue taxes due from CUSTOM 
DRYWALL OF TIDEWATER 
INC. The property will be sold at 
public auction as provided by IntO'- 
nal Revenue Code section 6335 and 
related regulations. Date of Sale: 
07-13-92, Time of Sale: 11:00 
a.m.. Place of Sale: 413 DAVIS 
ST. UNIT 103, VIRGINIA 
BEACH, VA. 23452. TiUe Offered: 
Only the right, title, and intoest of 
CUSTOM DRYWALL OF TIDE- 
WATER INC. in and to the prq)- 
erty will be offered for sale. If re- 
quested, the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice will furnish information about 

possible encumbrances, which may 
be useful in determining the value 
of the interest being sold. Descrip- 
tion of Property: Two executive 
desks, 2 tables, 1 drafting table, 4 
chairs, 1 tall storage cabinet. 1 fil- 
ing cabinet, one memory electric 
typewriter SMITH CORONA 
Model SD 250. 1 wall clock. 1 
ashtray stand, one wall map, one 
lot of miscellaneous dry wall and 
drywall equipments, one lot of 

miscellaneous office supplies. 
Property may be Inspected at: 413 
DAVIS ST., UNIT 103. VIR- 
GINIA BEACH. VA. 23462. Pay- 
ment Terms: Full payment required 
on acceptance of highest bid. Form 
of I^yment: All payments must be 
jy cash, certified check, cablet's or 
treasurer's check or by a United 
States postal, bank, express, or 
telegnq)h money ordo'. Make check 
or money order payable to the In- 
ternal Revenue Service. 

A. MUNSON, REVENUE OF- 
FICER, Date: 06-26-92, 200 
Granby Mall, Room 529, Norfolk, 
VA 23510, 441-3059. 

27-6 
lt7.1VBS 



c 



PubHc Nolice 



Auction: 1980 Chevrolet Caprice 
#5862 

Serial Number #1N69JA11890- 
95 

AucUon date: July 17, 1992 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy., Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right to Bid. 

27-5 
lt7.1VBS 



Public Notice 



Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of the fcity of Virginia 
Beach will be held in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall Build- 
ing, Municipal Center, Princess 
Anne Station, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, on Tuesday, July 14, 1992, 
at 2:00 p.m., at which time the 
following applications will be 
heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DIS- 
TRICT CLASSmCATION: 

PRINCESS AN NE BOROUGH 

I. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thelma Britt Harris for a Condi- 
tional Chanpp- nf Toning District 
Classification from R-10 Residen- 
tial District to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 



sensmwnaC 



^ 



'■^^-?'.r'.t; ^^ '/-{^y^A 




530 feet north of Indian River 
Road, 4140 feet more or less west 
of Wwt Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential District is for single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this parcel 
for agricultural or residential land 
use consistent with the Plan poli- 
cies fw Transition Area II. Said 
parcel contains 5.4 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

2. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Alice Britt, Mary E. Briu and 
Thelma V. Harris for a Conditional 
rhflnye of 7.nniny District 
Classification from R-10 Residen- 
tial District to AG-2 Agricultural 
District on certain property located 
on the North side of Indian River 
Road, 4010 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to AG- 
2 Agricultural District is for agri- 
cultural land use at a density no 
greater than I dwelling unit per 
acre. The Comprehensive Plan rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural or residential land use 
consistent with the Plan policies 
for Transition Area II. Said parcel 
contains 6.8 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

3. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thehna Britt Harris for a Condi- 
tional Chang e of Zoninj? District 
Classification from R-15 Residen- 
tial District to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
1030 feet North of Indian River 
Road, 4900 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential District is for single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this parcel 
for single family residential land 
use at a density no greater than 0.8 
dwelling units per acre. The Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use of 
this parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent with the 
Plan policies for Transition Area U. 
Said parcel contains 2 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

4. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thehna Britt Harris for a Condi- 
tional Change of Zoning District 
Classification from AG-2 Agricul- 
tural Disttict to R-40 Residential 
Disuict on certain property located 
on the North side of Indian River 
Road, 3960 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential District is for single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this parcel 
for agricultural or residential land 
use consistent with the Plan poli- 
cies for Transition Area II. Said 
parcel contains 9.7 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

5. 

. An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thelma Britt Harris for a Condi- 
Uonal Change of Zoning District 

D ContlnuadOn Pag* 7 



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U) help y«i: 

• To get the fiber you ne«I, 
clKX>se «veral servings a day of 
foods made from whole grains, 
such as wlK)le-wheat bread. 



• Eat a .variety of vegetables 
regularly, including dark-green 
leafy ones (spinach, romaine, 
lettuce, broccoli); deep-yellow 
ones (carrots, sweet potatoes); 
starchy ones (potatoes, com 
peas); legumes (navy, pinto and 
kidney beans, chickpeas); and 
others Oettuce, tomatos, onions 
and green beans). Try to include 
daric-green leafy vegetables and 
legumes several times a week. 

• Go easy on the fats and 
sugars you add to foods as 
spreads, seasonings or U)i^inp. 

• Choose fresh fruits, 
unsweetened fhiit juices and fmit 
frozen or caiuied in water or 
juice. Have citrus fniits, melons 
awl berries regularly. They are 
ridi in vitamin C. 

• Count only 100 percent 
fruit juice. Fruit drinks, punches 
and »!es contain little jdice and 
lots of added sugars. Grape and 
orange sodas don't count as fruit 
juice either, they're soft drinks. 

• Choose skim milk and 
nonfat yogurt often. They are 
the lowest fat dairy choices. 

• 0100% ten) cuts of meats, 
pwiltry without the skin and fish. 
They are good sources of iron 
anddnc. 




533-LroS (5437) 

Medical Towa Executive Tower 

Norfolk Hanq^ton 

Medicare and Champm 

partk^pant All tosunmce filed. 



TRAVEL 
LIGHT. 






»Jtm. 



TheLynnhaven 
Fish HoCse 
^staurant 




Overlooking Ti» 
In Virginia Bench 

Serving Luneh & Dinner Daihr 

11:30 MB. to 10:30 p.m. Located on 

top of the Lynnhaveo Pier im the 

Cheaapeake Bay, Swre Drive and 

Starflah Boad • 481-00(» 







EXERCISE. 

American Heart 
Association 



^ 



e 18%, AmwKan HmH AuocMian 



Become a part off the weekly Sensational Seniors 
directoiy. Call Sharon McGrath today for more in- 
fomiation or to place your advertisement. 547-4571. 



O OolMiHMd hom Pig* 6 

f|ap«ifeiirifiii finom AG-1 Agricul- 
tural IMstrict to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
620 feet North of Indian River 
Road. 3730 fMt more or 1ms west 
of West Neck Road. The prorosed 
zoning cUs^Bcadon change to R- 
40 R^ideotial District is fa single 
family residNitial land use at a den- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
unitt per acre. The Comimhensive 
Plan recmnnwnds use of this parcel 
for agricultural w residential land 
u% consistent with the Plan poli- 
^ cies f(^ Transition Area U. Said 
.parcel contains 12.9 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

6. 

An Ordinance upon Applicaticm 
of Alice Britt. Mary E. Britt and 
Thelma V. Haris for a Conditional 
Change of Zoniny ni.trjrt 



riMMfication frwn R-20 Residm 
tial Disffict to AG-2 Agricultural 
District on certain property located 
on die Nonh side of Indian River 
Rottl, 5600 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to AG- 
2 Agricultural District is for agri- 
cultural land use at a density no 
greata than 1 dwelling unit per 
acre. The Comprdiensive nan rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural or residential land use 
consistent with the Plan policies 
f(^ Transition Area II. Said parcel 
contains 2.3 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 
7. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of James L. Miller, Trustee. Indian 
River nantation. Inc., Indian River 
Country Club Estates, L.P., 
Thomas Vance and Robert Ripley 
fora Conditinnfl[ Change of Ton- 
ing District Claasificarinn ftnm P. 
20 Residoitial District to AG-2 
Agricultural District on the follow- 
ing parcels: 

Pareel 1: Located 570 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 1420 feet more <« less west 
of West Neck Read. 

EucfiLil Located 1260 feet nordi 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 450 feet mote or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

QuccLl. Located 3500 feet nodi 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 450 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

EaccsLi; Located 1440 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 3720 feet west of West Neck 
Road. 

Parcels: Located 2360 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 3480 feet more or less west 
of West Ncdc Road. 

EaOEfiliiL Located 4000 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 740 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

£ai£fiLZL LocatediOSO feet nordi 
of Indjut River Rosl beginning at a 
point 464&1(BelWst of West Neck 
Road. 

The proposed zoning classifica- 
tion change to AG-2 Agricultural 
District is for agricultural land use 
at a density no greater than 1 
dwelling unit per acre. The Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use of 
this parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent with the 
Plan policies for Transition Area II. 
Said parcels contain IIS acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
8. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of James L. Miller, Trustee, Indian 
River Plantation, Inc.. Indian River 
Country Oub Estates, LP.. Dock- 
cry Lambert. Jr., Thomas Vance & 
Robert Ripley for a Conditional 
Change of Zoning District 
Clasnifiration from R-IO Residen- 
tial District to AG-2 Agricultural 
Distikt on the following |»Fcels: 

Parcel 1: Located on the north 
side of Indiw River Road beginning 
at a point 2900 feet more or less 
w^ of West Neck Road. 

Parcel 2: Located on the north 
side of Indian River Road beginning 
at a point 2950 feet mtxe or less 
west of West Neck Road. 

Parcel 3: Located on the west side 
of West Neck Road beginning at a 
point 750 fe» more (a less north of 
Indian RivCT Road. 

The prty o se d zoning classifica- 
tion chan^ to AG-2 Agricultural 
Distrtot is fa agricultural land use 
at a density no greater than 1 
dwelling unit per acre. The Com- 
prdiensive Plffii renmimends u% of 
diis parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent with the 
Plan policies fw Transition Area II. 
Said parcels contain 97.5 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
9. 

An Odinance upmi Application 
of Indian Riv» Plantation, Inc., 
Thomas Vance and Robert Ripley 
for « Cnndttinniil ni«iffe of Zoning 
DijBrict flMMfeatioB from AG-2 
Agricultural District to R-40 Resi- 
dential Disttict on c^tain fvoperty 
located m tlw nwth side of Indian 
Riva R(^ b^inaipg wt a pmnt 
2240 feet more w le» «^(tf West 
Neck R(»d. The prc^josed zoning 
classificttiraj chan^ to R-40 Res- 
dential Distrkt is fct single funily 



residential land use at a density no' 
greater than 0.8 dwelling units per 
aae. The Comprehensive Han rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural <x resictendal land use 
consistent with the Plan policies 
for Transition Area II. Said parcel 
contains 76.8 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

10. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Indian River Plantation. Inc.. 
Thomas Vance and Robm Ripley 
for a Conditional rh]^nffi ftf ZiffllJIlg 
District rias»if^i;atjnn from AG-1 
Agricultural District to R-40 Resi- 
dential District on certain property 
located 620 feet north of Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
3750 feet west of West Neck Road. 
The proposed zoning classificaticMi 
change to R-40 Residential District 
is for single family residential land 
use at a density no greater than 0.8 
dwelling units per acre. The Com- 
prehensive nan recommends use of 
this parcel fa- agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent widi the 
Plan policies fa Transition Area II. 
Said parcel contains 22 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

II. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of James L. Miller. Trustee. Indian 
River Plantation, Inc. and Indian 
River CounUy Club Estates, L.P. 

for a Conditional Chtrnje. nf Toning 
District Classincation from R-IS 
Residential District to AG-2 Agri- 
cultural District on the following 
parce ls:. 

Parcel 1; Located 340 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 540 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

EaiCfiLZ: Located 1270 feet n(»di 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 3820 feet mae cs less west 
of West Neck Road. 

Parcel 3: Located 1750 feet nwth 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 5500 feet more (a less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to AG- 
2 Agricultural District is for agri- 
cultural land use at a density no 
greater than 1 dwelling units per 
acre. The Comprehensive Flan rec- 
ommends use of tills parcel for 
agricultural or residential land use 
consistent witii the Plan policies 
for T^sition Area II. Said parcel 
contains 102.5 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
PRINCESS A NNE BOROUGH 
12. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Indian River Pl^tation, Inc. and 
Indian River Country Gub Estates, 
L.P. for a Conditional Use Pennit 

for a recreational facility of an out- 
door nature (golf cmirse) on certain 
property located at die Northwest 
intersection of Indian River Road 
and West Neck Road. Said parcel 
contains 180.4 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH 
13. 

Appeal from Decisions of Ad- 
minisb-ative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of die Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision {<x Indian 
River Plantation/Britt Farm. Prop- 
erty is located at the nordiwest cor- 
ner of die intersection of West Neck 
Road and Indian River Road. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGR 
AMENDMENT: 
14. 

Motion of the Planning Com- 
mission of Uie City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amoid iheVir- 
ginia Beach Cbmis^ensive Ran to 
revise land use policies and recom- 
mendations affecting Uiose parcels 
adjacent to and in the genoal vicin- 
ity of General Hooth Boulevard 
from Oceana Boulevard to Princess 
AimeRoad. 
NONCONFORMING USE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 
IS. 

Application of Rev. William H. 
Perry for die enlargement of a non- 
confcmning use on [m^rty located 
at 456 Rudder Road. Said parcel 
contains 13,200 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGR 

All interested posons are invited 
toattoid. 
Rudi Hodges Smidi, CMC/AAE 
City Clerk 

If you are physically disabled, 
hearing or visually impaired and 
need a^i^ance, ptease ctdl DONNA 
JOHNSTON at 427-4283 VOICE 
or TDD by July 10, 1992. 

27-4 
2t7-gVBS 

hiblcNoilc* 1 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 1. 1992 7 



Take notice diat (m 07/D2/92. at 
10:00 AM. at die premiKS of 4747 
Shae Drive, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, die undersigned will kU at 
public aiKUon, fat cash, reserving 
unto itself, die right to bid. the 
folk)wing moux vehicle. 

1987 ChiysferLe Baron 

Serial «lC3aSlE7HGn76778 

BAYSIDEMCmXtS 

27-3 
It7-1VB S 

I Pubic Notc» 

Tal» notice, diat on July 3. 1^2 



at 10:00 o'clock A.M.. at tiie 
premises of 4753 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462, die un(tersigned will sell at 
public auction, fa cash only, re- 
serving the right to bid, the 
following mota vducle: 
1985 CADILLAC DEVDXE 
VIN: 1G6CD6988F4233559 

27-2 
lt7.1VBS 



I Public NoHc» I 

Auction: 1982 VW Jetta #5873 

Serial Number: #WVW66016- 
7CW1 19596 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Uie Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy., Norfolk. Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves die right to Bid. 

27-1 

lt7.1VBS 

I . PubBcNotlc» ^ 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of die City 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in die Council 
Chambers of die City Hall Build- 
ing, Municipal Center. Princess 
Anne Station, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia. (Ml Tuesday. July 7. 1992. at 
2:00 p.m.. at which time die fol- 
lowing i^lications will be heard: 

SUBDIVrSIQN VARIANCE: 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. 

Appeal from Decisions of Ad- 
ministintive Officers in regard to 
certain elements of die Subdivision 
Ordinance. Subdivision for H.A.V. 
Inc.. James Arnold. Pres. Pnqierty 
is located at die northwest uitersec- 
tion of NordiampttNi Boulevard and 
Jack F^ost Road. BAYSIDE BOR- 
OUGH. 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH 

2. 

Appeal from Decisions of Ad- 
ministrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of die Subdivision 
Ordinance. Subdivision for ALOT 
Corporation, ftoperty is located on 
Huckleberry Trail and Lillipond 
Lane. PRINCESS ANNE BOR- 
OUGH. 

3. 

Appeal from Decisions of Ad- 
ministivtive Officers in regard to 
certain elemenu of die Subdivision 
Ordinance. Subdivision for Bernard 
Ardiur Walker. Prc^rty is located 
on die soudi side of Indian River 
Road. 2028.32 feet west of West 
Neck Road. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITION AL USE PERMIT: 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH 

4. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of 1984 Bernard A. Walker Family 
Tnist for a Conditional Use F^rmit 
for a single family homes on cer- 
tain pmpetty located on die soudi 
side of Indian River Road. 2028.32 
feet west of West Neck Road. Said 
parcel contains 22.17 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

5. 

An Ordinance upon ^iplication 
of LiiMla Chattel for a Conditional 
Use Permit for a recreational facil- 
ity of an outdoOT nature (golf driv- 
ing range &. accessory uses) m die 
soudi side of London Bridge Road. 
980 feet more or less west of 
Swamp Road. Said pared is kicated 
at 1549 London Bridge Road and 
contains 17.68 acres moe a less. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
6. 

An Ordinance upon A|q>lication 
of Gayle R. &. Jacqueline Rountree 
far a Condidnnfll Uae Pennit for an 

animal hoqrital on pn^ierty located 
800 feet more or less soudi of 
Seaboard Road beginiung at a point 
2640 feet more a less west of 
Princess Anne Road. Said i»rcel is 
located at 2997 Seabood Road and 
conuins 60 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

PUNGQ BOROUGH 

7. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of David & Marcia Salmois for a 

Conditional Use Pennit fey a single 

bmily dwelling in the AG-2 Agri- 
cultural District on cotain |xoperty 
located on die east nde of Princess 
Anne R(»d. 350 feet more or less 
nordi(tf Poachy Court Said parcel 
contains 3 acres. PUNGO BOR- 
OUGH. 

8. 

An Ordinuice upon Application 
of Jeffrey D. Salmcms fa a Condi- 
tional Use Pennit fa- a single fam- 
ily dwelling in the AG-2 
Agricultural Disti-ict on certain 
prcqxrty kxtted on die vest side o( 
Princess Anne Road, 950 feet moe 
a less south of Blossom Hill 
Court. Said parcel contains 2.1 
acres. PUNGO BOROUGH 

9. 

An Ordinance upon Applkai^M 
of JwK Kay Freemffii fa a Cnwrti. 
tioMi Use Prnnit for 2 sm^ bm- 
Uy dwellings in the Agrkultural 
Difirk^ on cmain prop»^ kicked 
at dM DOdKttt comer of Inditti 
Rivtf Road nd N. Middy Credc 
Road. SaMi pmxl contriitt 56.66 
acres. PUI^X) BO»>UGK 

10. 

Aa Qrdt^Doe 190a ApfUa^tm 
of J. Hny AKMhetya H. MoiB for 



. a Conditional Um Pemiit far a »m. 
gle fiunily divellkig in die MS Dis- 
trkia and fa boiling horKs on 
certain property located on die 
south side of Indian Riva Road. 
1088 feet west of Princess Anne 
Road. Said parcel contains 16.5 
acres. PUNGO BOROUGH 
KBMPSVnJ^BOROIIfiH 

U. 

An Ordinance upoi ^^licatioi 
of Konpsville Consovative Syna- 
gogue, Kehillat B« Hamkhash fa a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 

churdi (amoidment) at die nodieast 
temimus of Indian UdcM Boulevard. 
Said parcel is located at 952 Indian 
Lakes Boulevard and contains 3.682 
acres. KEMPSVUif BOROUGH. 
BLACKWATCRRnRniTr.H 

12. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Charies W. Lewis. Jr. & A.E. 
Werner fa a Conditional I Im Per, 
mil fw a singte fiunily dwelling in 
die Agricultural District on die 
west side of Blackwata Road. 2300 
ftset more a less soudi of Old Car- 
olina Road. Said parcel is located at 
4933 Blackwater Rod and contains 
3.04 acres. BLACKWATER BOR- 
OUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROtinH 

13. 

An CMinance upon ^)plication 
of Kim Nolte fa a Conditional Use 
Permit for a pre-school at die 
soudiwest intersection of N. Great 
Neck Road and Rose Hall Drive. 
Said parcel is located at 2225 Rose 
Hall Drive and contains 5.9 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BC»10UGR 

STREET Cir^STIgR 

LYNNHAVEN WnRmifiH 

14. 

Application of The Runnymede 
Cotpoation for the discontinuance, 
closure uid abandonment of a pa- 
tion of Walnut Street beginning at 
die nwdiem boundary of Soudi 
Boulevard and running in a 
nordieriy direction a distance of 40 
feet moe a less. Said parcel coi- 
tains 2,901 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

AUlnterested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Rudi Hodges Smidi. CMC/AAE 
City Cleric 

If you are physically disabled, 
hearing or visudly impaired and 
need assistance, please call DONNA 
JOHNSTON at 427-4283 VOICE 
a TDD by July 3. 1992. 

26-7 
2t7-iyBS 



PubHc NoHc* 



The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Wednesday. July 8, 
1992 at 12:00 Noon in die Council 
Chambers of die City Hall Build- 
ing, Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. A brief- 
ing session will be held at 9:00 
a.m. in die City Manager's Confer- 
ence Room, City Hall Building. 
PLANNING COMMISSION AC- 
TION IS NOT A FINAL DETER- 
MINATION OF THE APPLICA- 
TION, BUT ONLY A RECOM- 
MENDATION TO THE CITY 
COUNCIL AS THE VIEWPOINT 
OF THE PLANNING COMMIS- 
SION. FINAL DETERMINATION 
OF THE APPLICATION IS TO 
BE MADE BY CITY COUNCIL 
AT A LATER DATE, AFTER 
PUBLIC NOTICE IN A NEWS- 
PAPER HAVING GENERAL 
CIRCULATION WITHIN THE 
CITY. 

THOSE MEMBERS OF 
THE PUBLIC INTERESTED 
IN ATTENDING THE PUB- 
LIC HEARING SHOULD BE 
ADVISED THAT, FOR 
REASONS THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION DEEMS AP- 
PROPRIATE, CERTAIN 
ITEMS ON THE AGENDA 
MAY BE HEARD OUT OF 
ORDER AND THAT IT 
SHOULD NOT BE AS- 
SUMED THAT THE ORDER 
LISTED BELOW WILL BE 
EXACTLY FOLLOWED 
DURING THE PUBLIC 
HEARING. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of die items on diis agenda suggest 
diat certain conditiois be attached 
to approval by City Council. 
However, it should not be assumed 
diat dKise conditiois coistitiite all 
die conditions diat will ultimately 
be attached to die project. Staff 
ageiKies may impose further condi- 
tions ttid requirements during ad- 
ministration of aiqilicable city 
or dina ices. 
REGULAR AGENDA- 
SUBDIVISION VARIANTF- 
1. 

Appeal fran Dccisiais of Ad- 
ministrative Officas in regard to 
cotain demoits of die Subdiviskxi 
Ordinance. Subdivision fa Jerry 
Pecaut). Prc^rty is located at 
2451 Potters Road. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMTT 
2. 

Am (Mtaaaust ypoa ApfUe^oa 
of 0^^ L. Kovaci, Jr., fa a 
r/wditi«i.i ^ ly YtmW ^ ■ '"ff'' 
Evnily dweling n die Apicidtt^ 
District on die Mst side of 
BlackwMerRoBd. 1689 feet noca 



less south of Pungo Ferry Road. 
Said parcel contains 5.52 acres. 
BLACKWATER BOROUGH. 

3. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Shipmates Ltd.. T/A Grand 
Rental Station fa a Conditional 
Use Permit for motor vehicle 
rentals (trucks) on die soudiwest 
side of London Bridge Road. 160 
feet northwest of Mansion Cross 
Lane. Said parcel is located at 2413 
London Bridge Road and contains 
3.33 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

4. 

An (Odinance upon Applicatioi 
of Clinton E. Cuffee, True Gospel 
Christian Church fa a Conditional 
Use Permit for a church on die 
soudi side of Providence Road, 350 
feet more a less east of the inter- 
section widi Indian River Road. 
Said parcel is located at 6059 Prov- 
idence Road and contains 25,000 
square feet. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

5.^ 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Indian River Golforama, Inc., fa 
a Conditional Use Permit for a 
recreational facility of an outdoa 
nature (mini-golO on die east side 
of S. Military Highway, 930 feet 
more or less soudi of Indian River 
Road. Said parcel is located at 920 
South Military Highway and con- 
tains 18.5 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

6. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of^ Christopher Ulman/East-West 
Foreign Car Service, Inc., for a 
Conditional Use Permit for an au^ 
tomobile sovice and repair estab- 
lishment on Lots 5. 6. 7, 8 and 
Lots 17 duough 20. Block 6, Vir- 
ginia Be^h Annex #2. Said parcel 
is located al 849 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and contains 28.314 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGR 

7. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of WIUAMCO Development Ca- 
poration for a Conditional Use 
Pernfiit fa filling a borrow pit on 
die east side of Barrs Road. 98.90 
feet nodi of Evelyn Avenue. Said 
parcel is located at 1256 Barrs Road 
and contains 3.44 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGR 

8. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of The Church of St. Gregoy The 
Great fa a Conditional Use I^rmit 
for a church expansion on (xrtain 
iwcqierty located at 5345 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. Said parcel con- 
tains 16.3 acres. BAYSIDE BOR- 
OUGH. 

AMENDMENT: 

9. 

Motion of the City of Virginia 
Beach to amend die Chesiqieake Bay 
Preservation Area Ordinaire per- 
taining to. but not limited to. Re- 
source Management Area Desipa- 
tion, the nontidal wedands defini- 
tion, erosion and sediment control 
for nonconforming structures and 
uses, swimming pool exemptions, 
the definition of redevelopment, 
wata dependent facilities, the de- 
fault load for stomwater manage- 
ment, intensely dt\tlaped areas and 
a definition of public roads. More 
detailed information is available in 
die Planning Dqartment. 

DfiFERREP BY PLANNING 

COMMISSION ON 11/14/90: 

10. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Joseph Preziotti, Jr., Design 
Graphics, Inc., for a Conditional 
Change of Zoniny District 
Classification firx»n R-5D Residen- 
tial Duplex District 10 0-1 Office 
District on the West side of N. 
Landstown Road, 400 fe^ mon a 
less south of Monet Drive. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change is for office land use. The . 
Comprehensive Plan designates diis 
site fa single family residential de- 
velopment widi a density no greater 
than 3 dwelling units per acre. Said 
parcel is located at 1857 N. Land- 
stown RcKid and contains 2.3 ^res. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
DEFERRED BY PLANNING 

COMMISSION ON inygygi: 
11. 

Application of Herman. Inc., fa 
the discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a 20 foot unnamed 
lane k)cated betweoi 2nd Str^t and 
3rd Su-eet beginning at die eastern 
boundary of PaciHc Avenue aiMI 
running in an easteriy direction a 
distmice of 1 19.42 feet Said jmccl 
contains 2365.5 square feet VIR- 
GINIA BEACH BOROUGR 

DEFERRED BY PLANNINO 
CQMMT.S.SIf»jnNfi/in/Q?- 

12. 

An Odinance upoi Application 
of Thebna Britt Harris fa a Condi- 
tioial Change of Zoning District 
ClassificatitM from R-10 Resi(fen- 
tial District to R-40 Residential 
District oi cotain pt^rty locauxl 
530 feet noth of Indian River 
RokI. 4140 feet more a less west 
(^ West Neck Road. The i^qxised 
zoiing classificatioi change to R- 
40 R^idoitial Dboict is fa single 
family reridentU l«)d uxat a doi- 



sity no greater dian 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of diis parcel 
for agricultural a residential land 
use consistent widi the Plan poli- 
cies for Transition Area II. Said 
parcel contains 5.4 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

13. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Alice Britt, Mary E. Britt and 
Thelma V. Harris for a Conditional 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-10 Rcsideri- 
tial District to AG-2 A^petttlural 
Disuict on certain propdiy located 
on die Nordi side of Indian River 
Road, 4010 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to AG- 

2 Agricultural Disuict is for agri- 
cultural land use at a density no 
greater than 1 dwelling unit per 
acre. The Comprehensive Plan rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural or residential land use 
consistent with the Plan policies 
for Transition Area II. Said parcel 
contains 6.8 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

14. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thehna Briu Harris for a Condi- 
tional Change of Toning pjslrjf t 
Classification from R-IS Residen- 
tial Disu-ict to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
1030 feet Nordi of Indian River 
Road, 49(X) feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential District is for single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of diis parcel 
for single family residential land 
use at a density no greater dian 0.8 
dwelling units per acre. The Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use of 
diis parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent widi the 
Plan policies fa Transition Area II. 
Said parcel contains 2 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
15. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thelma Britt Harris for a Condi- 
tional Change of Zoning Di^triry 
Classification from AG-2 Agricul- 
tural District to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
on die Nordi side of Indian River 
Road, 3960 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential District is for single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater dian 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of diis parcel 
for agricultural or residential land 
use consistent with the Plan poli- 
cies for Transition Area II. Said 
parcel contains 9.7 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
16. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thelma Britt Harris for a Condi- 
tional Change of 7.oning District 
Classification from AG-1 Agricul- 
tural Disu-ict to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
620 feet North of Indian River 
Road, 3730 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. Tlie proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential Disttict is fa single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater dian 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. Hie Comp-ehensive 
Plan recommends use of diis parcel 
for agricultural or residential land 
use consistent widi the Plan poli- 
cies fa Transition Area II. Said 
parcel contains 12.9 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
17. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Alice Briu, Mary E. Briu and 
Thelma V. Harris fa a Conditional 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-20 Residen- 
tial District to AG-2 Agricultural 
District oi certain property located 
on die Nordi side of Indian River 
R(^, 5600 feet more a less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to AG- 
2 Agricultural Disttict is for agri- 
culture land use at a density no 
greater than 1 dwelling unit per 
acre. The Comprehensive Plan rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural a residential land use 
consistent widi the Plan policies 
fa Transition Area II. Said parcel 
contains 2.3 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 
18. 

An Ordinance upon Applicatioi 
of James L. Miller. Trustee, Indian 
River Rantation, Inc., Indim River 
Country Club Estates, L.P., 
Thomas Vance and Robert Ripley 
fa a Conditimial Ct^ge of Toning 
Disttict Classification fnm R-20 
Resi<tential Disuict to AG-2 Agri- 
cultural Disttict on the following 
paicels: 

Parcel 1: Located 570 feet noth 
of Indian River Roai beginning at a 
point 1420 f(«t mae or less west 
of We«a Neck Road. 

£ll££L2l Located 1260 feet nodi 
of IiKlian River Road beginning at a 

O Coitlmwd On ^^ S 



g Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday, July 1. 1992 



Contlnutd From ftg«7 

point 4S0 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

Pmcel 3: Located 3500 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 450 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

Parcel 4: Located 1440 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 3720 feet west of West Neck 
Road. 

Parcels: Located 2360 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 3480 feet more or less west 
of Wea Neck Road. 

Pared 6: Located 4000 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 740 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

Pared 7: Located 1990 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 4640 feet west of West Neck 
Road. 

The proposed zoning classifica- 
tion change to AG-2 Agricultural 
District is for agricultural land use 
at a density no greater than 1 
dwelling unit per acre. Hie Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use of 
this parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent with the 
Plan policies for Transition Area II. 
Said parcels contain 115 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

19. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of James L. Miller, Trustee, Indian 
River Plantation, Inc., Indian River 
Country Club Estates, LJ*., Dock- 
ery Lambert, Jr.. Thomas Vance & 
Robert Ripley for a Conditional 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-10 Residen- 
tial District to AG-2 Agricultural 
District on the following parcels: 

Parcel I: Located on the north 
side of Indian River Road beginning 
at a point 2900 feet more or less 
west of West Neck Road. 

Parcel 2: Located on the north 
side of Indian River Road beginning 
at a point 2950 feet more or less 
west of West Neck Road. 

Parcel 3: Located on the west side 
of West Neck Road beginning at a 
point 750 feet more or less north of 
Indian River Road. 

The proposed zoning classifica- 
tion change to AG-2 Agricultural 
District is for agricultural land use 
at a density no greater than 1 
dwelling unit per acre. The Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use of 
this parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent with the 
Plan policies for Transition Area II. 
Said parcels contain 97.5 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

20. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Indian River Plantation, Inc., 
Thomas Vance and Robert Ripley 
fnr a f ^^nriitinnal Chanyc of Zoning 

District Classification from AG-2 
Agricultural District to R-40 Resi- 
dential District on certain property 
located on the north side of Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
2240 feet more or less west of West 
Neck Road. The proposed zoning 
classification change to R-40 Resi- 
dential District is for single family 
residential land use at a density no 
greater than 0.8 dwelling units per 
acre. The Comprehensive Plan rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural or residential land use 
consistent with the Plan policies 
for Transition Area II. Said parcel 
contains 76.8 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

21. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Indian River Plantation, Inc., 
Thomas Vance and Robert Ripley 
for a Conditional Change of Zoning 
District Classification from AG-1 
Agricultural District to R-40 Resi- 
dential Disuict on certain property 
located 620 feet north of Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
3750 feet west of West Neck Road. 
Hie proposed zoning classification 
change to R-40 Residential District 
is for single family residential land 
use at a density no greater than 0.8 
dwelling units per acre. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
use of this parcel for agricultural or 
residential land use consistent with 
the Plan policies for Transition 
Area II. Said parcel contains 22 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROIXJR 

22. 

An Ordinance iqxm Ai^lication 
of Junes L. Miller. Trustee, Indim 
River Plantation, Inc. and Indian 
River Country Club Estates, LP. 
for a Conditional Change of Zoning 
Disirict Classification from R-IS 
Residential District to AG-2 Agri- 
cultural District on the following 
parcels: 

Parcel 1: Located 340 feet mwth 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 540 feet imxe or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

EaccdJL Located 1270 feet north 
of Indian River Road begiming at a 
point 3820 feet moe or less wett 
of West Neck Road. 

Pared 3: Located 1750 feet north 
of Indian River Road begimiing at a 
point 5500 feet more or less w^ 
of West Neck Road. 

The pn^wsed nming dasufioi- 



uon change to AG-2 Agricultural 
District is for agricultural land use 
at a density no greater than 1 
dwelling unit per acre. The Com- 
prehensive nan recommends use of 
this parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use OHisistent with the 
Plan policies for Tiransition Area 11. 
Said parcels contain 102.5 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGR 
CONDmONAL USE PERMIT: 

23. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Indian River Plantaticm, Inc. and 
Indian River Country Club Estates, 
LP. for a Cnnditinnal Use Permit 
for a recreational facility of an out- 
door nature (golf course) on certain 
property located at the Northwest 
intersection of Indian River Road 
and West Neck Road. Said parcel 
contains 180.4 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

SI IRDIVISION VARIANCE: 

24. 

Appeal from Decisims of Ad- 
ministrative Officers in regard to 
certain dements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Indian 
River Plantation/Britt Farm. Prop- 
erty is located at the nwthwest cor- 
ner of the intersection of West Neck 
Road and Indian River Road. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 

Planning Directs 

26-6 
2t7-lVBS 

' Public NoHc* I 

VIRGINIA: In the Oeric's Of- 
fice of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on die 12th day 
of June, 1992. 

In re: Name change of Ronald 
McKinley Shifflett, infant 

By: Lynn Marie Curtis, his 
natural mother. Petitioners 

To: Paul Shifflett, 625 Chain 
Street, Norristown, Pennsylvania 
19401 

IN CHANCERY 

#Ch92-1848 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came Lynn Marie Cur- 
tis, Petitioner and represented that 
the object of this proceeding is to 
the effect name change of the above 
named infant Ronald McKinley 
Shimett, by Lynn Marie Curtis, 
his natural mother, and affidavit 
having been made and filed that 
Paul Shifflett, a natural parent of 
said child is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 625 
Chain Street. Norristown. 
Pennsylvania 19401. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said Paul Shifflett appear before 
this Court within ten (10) days aftn 
publication of this Order and indi- 
cate his attitude toward the proposed 
name change, or otherwise do what 
is necessary to protect his interest 
in this matter. 

It is further Ordoed that a copy oi 
this (>der be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Cleric 

By: Linda D. Jones, D.C. 

Willcox & Savage 

Attorneys at Law 

1800 Sovran Center 

Norf^olk, Virginia 23510 

25-7 
4t7-8VBS 



In re: Adoption of John Stever to 
be known as John Holman 

By: Larry Allan Hdman and Lisa 
Burek Holman, Petitioners 

To: Andrew James Stever, 684 
White Cedar Road, Toms River, 
New Jersey 08753 

INCHANCERY#92-110 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came Larry Allot Hol- 
man and Lisa Burek Holman. Peti- 
tioners, and rq)resented that the ob- 
ject of this proceeding is to effect 
the ^option of the above named 
infant John Stever, by Larry Allan 
and Lisa Burek Holman, husband 
and wife, and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Andrew James 
Stever, a natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 684 White 
Cedar Road, Toms River, New Jer- 
sey 08753. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said Andrew James Stever appear 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Order 
and indicate his attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect his in- 
terest in this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a copy of 
this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun. a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Linda D. Jones. D.C. 

Theodore A. Boyce, p.q. 

2648 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Virginia Beach. Va. 23452 

24-5 
4t7.1VBS 



PubHc Notice 



In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 29th day of May. 
1992. 
Lisa Butler, Plaintiff, against 
Randy Butler. Defendant 
Docket #CH92-1 175 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii and sole 
custody of Tamara Cason from the 
said defendant, upon the grounds of 
having lived separate and apart for 
more than one year. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defendant is 
not a resident of the State of Vir- 
ginia, the last known post office 
address being 533 W. Walnut 
Street. Allentown, PA 18019. 

It is ordered that Randy Butler do 
appear on or before the 20th of 
July, 1992. and do what may be 
necessary to protect his interest in 
this suit. It is further Ordered that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week f(»- four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun. a 
newspaper of general circulaticm in 
this city. 

A copy — Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit. Cleric 

By: Linda D. Jones, D.C. 

K. Reed Mayo, px}. 

P.O. Box 3889 

Nori'olk.VA235!4 

625-5501 

24-6 
4t7-lVBS 



PuMcNoHc* 



PubHc Notice 



] 



VIRGD«nA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 3rd day of 
June. 1992. 



In re: Adoption of Katelyn 
Danyale Bowman 

By: Sandra Rose Compton and 
Donald Floyd Compton. Petitioners 

To: James McCraw. 4629 Hill- 
sitte Drive. Louisville. Kentucky 
40216 

IN CHANCERY#CA92-92 

ORDER OF PUBLICA'nON 

This day came Sandra Rose 
Compton and Donald Floyd 
Compton. Petitioners, and repre- 
sented that the object of this pro- 
ceeding is to effect the adoption of 
the above named infant Katelyn 
Danyale Bowman, by Dcmald Floyd 
and Sandra Rose Compton, husband 
and wife, and affidavit having been 
made and filed tixat James McCraw, 
a natural parent of said child, is a 
non-resident of the State of Vir- 
ginia, the last known post o^ice 
address being: 4629 Hillside Drive, 
Louisville, Kentucky 40216. due 
diligence having been made by and 
on behalf of the petitioners herein 
to ascotain what city or county the 
natural father is in, without effect. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said James McCraw appear before 
this Court within ten (10) days aiva 
publication of this Older and indi- 
cate his attitwte toward die proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his interest in 
this matter. 

It is further Ordered thata copy of 
tiiis Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
die Virginia Beach Sun. a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fniit. Cleric 

By: Rhonda V. Tynes. D.C. 

John D. Hooker, Jr. p.q. 

P.O. Box 968 

Virginia Beach. VA 23451-0968 

(804)425-9977 

24-4 
4t7-lVBS 



Pick Up The Virginia Beach Sun 
At Any Of These Locations: 



Dr. Video 

Aragona Shopping Center 

Open House Diner 
309 Aragona Boulevard 

Super Fresh 
Rosemont Road 

The Sun Building 

138 South Rosemont Road 



MardlGras Motel 
2802 Atlantic Avenue 
Oceanfront Inn 

27th and Atlante Avenue 

Days ^n 

Atlantic Avenue 

Sea Vacationer 

34th and Atlantic Avenue 

Belvedere Resort Motel 



VIRGINIA: In Uie Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on die 29th day of 
May, 1992. 



Marite^iiaoe 


30th and Atlantic Avenue 


Virginia Beach Boulevard 






Waffle's 'n Things 


Peoples Drug Store 


Corner of Pacific Avenue 


Hilltop 


and Laskin Road 


Revco 


Farm Fresh 


Hilltop 


Virginia Beach Boulevard 


Virginia Beach 


Phar-Mor 


General Hospital 


1944 Laskin Road 


First Ck)lonial Road 






Texaco Food Mart 


Hess's Sub Shop 


1912 Laskin Road 


Great Neck Village 






Peoples Drug Store 


Super Fresh 


980 Laskin Road 


Hilltop Plaza 






The Beach Pub 


Holiday Food Store 


1001 Laskin Road 


General Booth Boulevard 






Shape's Salon 


Holiday Inn Park 


1065 Laskin Road 


General Booth Boulevard 






Belo Supermarket 


Thomas Murphy 


London Brkige 


1000 Pacific Avenue 






Hilltop Inn 


17th Street Surf Shop 


1284 Laskin f%>ad 


Pacific Avenue 






Farm Fresh 


Sir Afton inn 


Laskin Road 


Mediterranean Avenue 






Maricetplace 


Aquarius Mots! 


Laskin Road 


1909 Atlantic Avenue 






FoodLkin 


Comfort Inn 


Outlet Mall 



2015 Atlantic Avenue 

Ocean HolMay 

25th and Atlantic Avenue 

Post Office 

Atlantk; Avenue 

Ingram Pharmacy 

207 25th Street 

Princess Anne MotsI 

25th and Atlantic Avenue 

Seahawk Motel 
26th and Oceanfront 

The Boardwalk Inn 
2604 Atlantk; Avenue 

Seagull Motel 

27th and Atlantk: Avenue 

Vikkifl Motel 

2700 Atlantk; Avenue 



Chamber of Commerce 

Pembroke Mall parking k>t 

Annabelle's 

Pembroke Mall 

FoodLton 

Pembroke Mall 

Farm Fresh 

Independence Boulevard 

Peoples Drug Store 

Indepencence Boulevard 

Belo 

Northampton Boulevard 

Oicket Inn 
Northampton Boulevard 

FoodLton 

Newtown Road at Baker Road 



The Virginia Beacli Sun 

For Home Delivery, News Or Advertising, 
Caa 486-3430 




BLANKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Clas^lfleds are 

published In 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $175. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $6.00 per word.) 

Call 547-4571 for Classified Representath« 



WOLFF TANNING BEOS -Nm» 
Comnwrclal -Horn* Unitt From 
1109.00. Lanpi -Lollont-AccMto- 
riM. Monthly PayiTMntf Low m 
t1S.00.CaUTodwFREENEWColor 
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LAKE QASTON VA/NC 3S0 mllM 
•hor*lln*-Ov*r100iMI*rfronlk)lt, 
SPECIAL SPRING SALE. FREE 
LAKE MAP. Buyvrt Quid*. Call/ 
writ* Tanglawood Raalty, 804-636- 
2204, 1-800-336-881 6. Boa 116 
Bracay.VA 23919. 

FRIENDLY HOME PARTIES liat 
opaningi lor damonatralort. No caah 
InvaaMTMnt. NoMrvlcadwrn*. High 
conmlMlon and hoalMi awards. 
Two catalog*, ovw 600 Itarm. Call 
1-800488-4675. 

Myrtl«B*ach RESORT VACATION 
RENTALS -Ocaanfront condo*, 
hou**k**plng Includad. Indoor/oul- 
door pool*, whirlpool*, launa*. 
nghl *dt*nnii count, putting graant. 
Golf packaga* avalMbI*. Fraa Ixo- 
chura: 1-600-448-5653. 

PIONEER STEEL BUILDINGS 
•24«30xt0 $3,595.00 •30x40>10 
14,650.00 -30x60x12 $6,685.00 
■40x75x12 $8,895.00 •50x100x14 
$1 3,395.00 •80x 1 0Ox 14 $21 .995.00 
ALL SIZES ERECTION AVAILABLE 
MMI-STORAQE 1-600-637-5414. 

DONATE YOUR CAR, Trucli, 
Motorhoma, Boat, Raal Ettat* 
Stamp*, Coin*, C o l ac l fcia*. to Foun- 
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daductlbia, FREE TOWING; NEED 
NOT RUN 1-800-326-5922. 

DECK TOP BOATHOUSE with hoiat 
on 1/2 acra. Fully rip-rappad ahora 
Una. Raady lor your bottt on Smith 
Mtn. Walkar Devalopmant, 1-800- 
377-0470, Ownar/Agant. 

DRIVERS: START 24 CENTS -26 
CENTS. EARN TO 30 CENTS, 
HOME REGULARLY. FREE MEDI- 
CAL/DENTAL. RETIREMENT. 
$1,000 TARP PAY. SAFETY BO- 
NUS. CONVENTIONALS. RE- 
QUIRE 23 YRS 8 1 YR OTR. 
HOflNAOY TRUCK LINE 1-600-343- 
7969. 

HAPPY JACK TABLICKS: Pravant 
llaa* Mothar Natura* way without 
paatlcid**. ChawabIa 8 nutritiou* 
tabM. For Dog* « Cat*. At laad 8 
drug*tar**. 

A WONDERFULFAMILY EXPERI- 
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South Amarlcan, Japanata high 
achool oxchang* ttudanti arriving 
In Augu*L Bacom* a hoat lamlly/ 
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changa. Call Iran* (804) 746-8416 
or 1-eOO-SIBLINQ. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR 



THE SELF-EMPLOYED. Finally - 
Alfordabla, Coai-Enactlva Hoapltal 
inauranca*. Sad Employad/Small 
Butlns****. ADDITIONAL 140 (Mn- 
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('Undaiwritar PFL LIFE) 

WE BUY MORTGAGES And Trust 
Daads. Did You S*il Propany? Ra- 
calving Pay mam*? Why WaitI Fait. 
Ca*h Nowl Any SIza -NatlonwIda. 
QraatPrlcaa. CaU 1-800-659-CASH 
(2274). Mortgaga* Buyari of 
Ainarica. 

WHITEWATER RAFTING. Wa*t 
Virginia'* N*w and Gauloy Rivar*. 
July 4lhip*cial*. Call today forfra* 
broehura -l-SOO-eSS-HAFT. Drift- 
A-Bt, Inc., P.O. Box 665, FayattwiWa, 
WV 25840. 

Got a campground mambarthip or 
titnaahwa? Wa'll taKa It. Amarica'* 
mo*l (ucoaaif ul raaort r**ala daar- 
inghouaa. Call Raion Salat Inlor- 
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5967. 

COVENANT TRANSPORT •School 
+ 6month* OTR •Min. ag*23 •T*am 
pay27-29c-Slnglapay19-22cHigh 
mllaaga bonu* mil** •Molal lay- 
ovar -Loading/Unloading •Daadhaad 
•Paid In*. 1-800-441-4394. 

Horn* Sala by Ownar -goN and 
watarfront community on 
Chincelaagua Bay. 3 Badrooma, 2 
Bath*, Malntananc* fraa. Po**lbla 
ratiramant, vacation. $68,000. Call 
(804)824-6421. 

"LOG HOME DEALEhsHIP" Top 
Log Horn* Manufacturar, laak* 
Daaiar, Protected territory, high 
aarning potential, lull training 8 lead* 
provided. Need not inlerlare with 
praaent amiiloymant. Modal* Marl- 
ing at $9690. 1-800-264-LOGS 
(5647) "BRENTWOOD LOG 
HOMES" 427 Rivet Rock Blvd., 
Murtraetboro.TN 37129. 

Handyman Special -New one room 
kig cabin ready to llniah. Wooded 
parcel. $27,900 Bruntwick County 
near 1-85 and U.S. 58 80% linanc- 
ing. Ownar 804-496-0320. 

Truck Ownar -Oparator* -$2,000 
*ign-on bonu* tor *al*, qualillad 
driver* with 6 month* OTR exparl- 
anca.TuMon-lree training avallaUa 
lor Inexperienced driver*. 
northAmark^n Van Una*, 1-800- 
348-2147, Dapl. 047. 

MEDICAL SOCIETY OF VIRGINIA 
REVIEW ORGANIZATION -Medi- 
care Benatkilary Hotline ■Rk:hmond 
286-S397OuUklaRk4)mond1-B00- 
545-3814. Call K you have con- 
cern* about the quality of care you 
taoakradfrom a hoipital. home haaMi 
agency, aame-day surgery center 
or akillad nursing facility or if you 



teal you are bakig askad to leave 
the hoapltal too loon. 

CHRISTIAN SINGLES Local, World- 
wMe -Phona, Mai Indoducllona TaM. 
Find Lova, Dating, Marrlaga, Mean- 
ingful Compantonahip the S*n*l>l* 
wayl No Faaa. OonatkNia only, Fraa 
Brochure, Samplea:1-800-3e34113 
ExL 381. 

Orhrar* -Do you want ballar pay? 
O) you want mora mHaaT Thancall 
J.B. Hunt: 1-800-2JB-HUNT. EOE/ 
Subject to drug acreen. 

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -Luxury 
oceanfronl/oceanvlaw condomini- 
um*. 2 BdrmAMth, privaM balcony, 
CCTV/H80. Utchana, pool*. Ex- 
cellent rata*. Ocaanfront Vacation 
Rantala. Free Brochure -caH 1 -800- 
247-5459. 

TRUCK DRIVERS -1 yr. axp. -up 
to 28(/n<l. to Mart. Chooaa van or 
liat. Tultk>n-frae training for thoa* 
w/no axp. Great banatll*. CaH Pool 
Truck Lina 1-800-553-9443. Dapl. 
X-4. 

Single driver* can EARN UP TO 
33* PER MILE.Our high volume ol 
over dlmenakmal, flatbed, drop-deck 
freight enabtaa you to earn thaae 
top wagaa. EXTRA PAY lor (paclal 
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more moneyl AND RECEIVE DALY 
EARNINGS PROTECTIONI Our 
new earning* plan enauraa your 
family will receive a steady, weekly 
income as k>ng as your avaliaWa 
for work. TRISM SPECIALIZED 
CARRIEflS. 1-800-568-1851. 

Driver teama can EARN UP TO 
44.5* PER MILE. Our high volume 
of commercial and govamment 
freight enablaa qualWad dflvar laana 
to earn the beat w^aa. MINIMUM 
MILEAGE GUARANTEE AND 
MUCH MOREI You'll bepaki routed 
miles for dealgnaled commodlllei 
and drive only iala-modai, aalallMa- 
equipped convenllonala tor 
Amark»'* okl**t and largaat munl- 
tk)n* hauler. One year OTR and 
COL required. 1-800-289-8768. TRI- 
STATE MOTOR TRANSIT CO. 
McGII Special Sarvksaa. 

NEED A LOAN -Call our flnanclai 
information hotline. 1,750 kMn 
aourca*. $500 to $750,000. BmI- 
n***, pereonal, aignalura, debt oon- 
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Attention Veterana: Home Loani M 
purchaaa or ralinance 100% pur- 
chases/90% refinance* up to 
$144,000.00. Phon* Clarence 
PhilliptMongagaCompany. 1-615- 
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Call 547-4571 



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G & T LAWN MAINTENANCE 

The ultimate in lawn care. Licensed 
& insured. 471-9616. 



CARPET CLEANING 

No gimmicks S1750 per room Spot 
irealmeni/deodonzer included 

Hallways, closets, baths, 1/2 pnce 

853-7994 

Professional Steam Cleaning Soryice 



MOVING & HAULING 



CLEANING 



MOM'S CLEANING 

Houses, empty houses, office 
cleaning & apartments. Reasonable 
rates. Weekly, bi-weekly & monthly. 
Call 464-2639. Leave msg. 

MAKE YOUR HOUSE SPARKLE 

Kelly's Cleaning Service. Located 
near ODU. 489-2746. 



BOYD MOVING COMPANY 

Short notice, pick-up, delivery 
sen/ice. We accept appliances, fur- 
niture and tools toward the cost of 
mo ve. Call David at 855-2792. 

CHESSON TRANSFER 

Home & office movingi Insured. 
Reasonable rates, 545-1793. 



PAINTING & DECORATING 



GENERAL REPAIRS 



F & D SMALL & LARGE JOBS 

Drywalls, finishing, painting, mason- 
ry repairs, roofs. Specialize in 
decks. Remodeling of all types. Call 
464-2639. Ask for Dale. Leave msg 
on machine. 



COLOR PRIDE PAINTING CO. 

421-7007 

Before you make that final decision, 

let our customers speak to you by 

our reference list. Free estimates. 

Ray's Painting 
Free Estimates 

Quality work, interior, exterior, 
residential & commercial. Call day or 
night 853-3531. 



PLUMBING 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



CLEAI^IG SERVICE ONLY 

ENVIRONMENTALLY SAFE 

PRODUCTS USED 

Reskiential/commercial/move-ins, 
outs/one time. Senbr citizen/military 
discounts. A-O Kay bonded clean- 
ing seivice. 430-4405. 

A&R 

Roofs, gutters, painting, decks, 
doors, windows & carpentry. No 
jobs too small. Work guaranteed. 
588-5352 



24 HOUR PLUMBING SERVICE. 
SERVING ALL PARTS OF VA. 
BEACH. 7 DAYS A WEEK. Water 
heaters replaced. Leaks repaired. 
Gas lines and drain cleaning. 
Remodeling and new house 
plumbing. Many years of 
experience. Jim Maybee, state 
registered Master Plumber. 340- 
0492 anytimel (Va. Beach only) 



PROF-SERVICES 



RESUMES 

Fast, professional service. Job 
search assistance. Alpha 
Internatbnal, 490-7817. 



Subscribe Today! 

The Virginia Beach Sun 

486-3430 



HHl 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wedneadav. July 1. 1992 9 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Call Sharon today to place 
your ad in the classifieds. 

547-4571 




A 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

1 time 

2 times 
4 times 



20 Words 
orl»M 

$ 7.50 
$ 13.50 
$ 22.50 



AddHional 
words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your personal Classified Ad four times for only $22.50. You 
can cancel your ad at any time. 

All Classified Ads run in three newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additbnal charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 




i- 




































20 words 



Run my personal ad for . 
Payment is enclosed $ . 



Issues. 



Make cheek payable to Byeriy PabHeatlona 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name 

Address 



City. 



FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 



PERSONAL AOS muil b* pltMd by prl- 
y«M Indlvlduali. Comnarcltl and buil- 
nwt r«lit«d «di do not quallly lor a-tlna 
and 4.|liTa pcnonal raiM. 



COMBINATION RATE : Run IhK urn* p«nonal ad In any 
othar Byarly Publlcailoni nawtpapar lor an additional $3 
on* tlnw, n Iwo llmM, $7 lour ilmat. Nawipapan In 
FnnMn, Emporia. Litwanotvllla, DInwIddia and Patan- 
burg, Can M7-4t71 lor datalk. 



ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES 



BUS. OPPORTUNITIES 



WANTED JAPANESE SWORDS- 
Art, armour & related items. Ad- 
vanced collector. Highest prices 
paid. Free appraisals. 424-5563. 
ANTIQUES WANTED-Guns, 
swords, books, oyster cans, 
advertising, maps, oil paintings. 
491-6721 



VENDINQ ROUTE: For Sale. A 
business with a steady cish 
income. 1-600-955-0354. 



BUS. PROP/RENT 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



CAMPOSTELLA-Contrador special, 
office warehouse. 1,000 & 2,000 sq. 
ft. unKs. 481-4111. 



CUS8IC CARS -543-4260 

We build any dream car for you. 
Great appreciation & R.O.I. Let's 
talkl Mobile Maintenance. 

JEEP-'69 Wrangler, hard top, air, 6' 
lift, 33' tires. Loaded, lots of extras, 
low miles. $12,000/best offer. 552- 

0679. 

SEIZED VEHICLES BY DEA, FBI 
and U.S. CUSTOMS. Low as $100. 
CADILLACS, GM, BMS's, 
MERCEDES. PORCHES, FORDS. 
CALL 1-315-733-8512 Ext. R-486. 



BUS. PROP/SALE 



BOATS 



CARVER-28 FT. MARINER 
FLYBRIDGE CRUISER. Bougllt 
new in '87. hardly used. Twin 230 
inboards. new enclosure and more. 
MuatselL 424-2801. 



Classifieds Worktl 

Call 547-4571 
To Place Your Ad. 



COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS in 
downtown Portsmouth and 
Churchland. Call 399-8390, 484- 
1275 or 399-3298. Owner/Agent. 

SOUNDFRONT HATTERAS 
ISLAND, open under present 
ownership. 14 unit motel or family 
arcadii & ice cream park>r, lease/op- 
tion or owner financing. 919-987- 
2427. 

'Auto Repair, Beach $$ Maker 

* Paint & Body Shop • Woni LastI 

* Hot Dog Shop, $4,500 Gets You 

In. 

KENNY 490-3505 

MBB. Inc. 

LARRY'S COOKIES 

at Waterside Shopping Center. 
Priced tor quk:k sale, only $35,000. 
Call 627-7278 for Info. 

ICE CREAM SHOP EQUIPMENT- 
Used. Taylor freezer, ice machine, 
dip cabinet, etc. Call 919-482-2101. 
ask for Teresa. Night call 919-482- 
8262. 



Coming 

In 

September 

A special edition 
saluting the 1992 

Virginia Beach 
Neptune Festival. 

For more information, contact 

Gloria Rodgers at 

547-4571. 

or fax your ad copy to 

548-0390. 



CHILD CARE 



CHILDCARE-SHERWOOD 
FOREST/COLEMAN PUCE area. 
Days/nights. Weekends and drop- 
ins. Call 855-2605. 

DOUGLAS PARK AREA 

Qhild care in my home. Ex- 
perienced head teacher in day care. 
Preschool children accepted. USDA 
meals. 397-8973. 

CHILD CARE/NANIES-Family 
homes. Exp'd. Own car. Salary 
$5.00 to $6.00/hr. NO FEE. Csill 
467-1644. ^_ 

KEMPSVILLE-Responsible mom. 
USDA. Non-smoker. Full-time, $60 
week. Part-time, hourly. 474-2485. 



CLOTHING 



ALTERATION SERVICES & HAND 
PRESSING-2 pieces, $5.00; Shirt. 
$1.50; Hem. $3.00; Patch, $1.75; 
Ripping, $1.50; Same day servk:e. 
No charge, Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Open 7 days 8-9 p.m. Call MER- 
MAID 460-0257. 

WEDDING GOWN-White. full- 
length, short sleeves, satin w/ 
baded sequins. $300 or best offer. 
Call 471-3610. 



COMPUTER/EQUIPMENT 



LOOKING FOR A COMPUTER? 
Call us for the best prices on IBM 
compatibles. This month's special 
386-33 DX $1,349. COMPUTER 
BUSINESS SERVICE. 481-7586. 

COMPUTER-UPGRADES 386-40, 
$290. RAM $39.00 PER MEG. com- 
plete 38640 DX System. $1,500-4 
MB RAM. 120 MEG HD. High RES 
SVGA. Warranty. 424-0656. 



FLEA MARKETS 



MARY'S FLEA MARKET-Rent a 
table at Mary's Flea Market. Extra 
large tables. 983 Lynnhaven Pkwy.. 
Lynnhaven Plaza. 468-2519. First 
10 customers receive a free lottery 
ticket. 



FURNITURE 



CTAQERE8 
Thallands Best TWIn 

White rattan. 72 x 32 x 14. $500. 
Call 481 -0839. If no answer please 
repeat call. 



HELP WANTED 



MARKETINQ/OPiNION 
RESEARCH firm seeks participants 
for short discussion groups to share 
likes and dislikes about various 
products and services. Such 
research helps business and 
government leaders raspond to the 
public's needs. If interested. Call 
Harriet, INFOCUS Group Servk:es, 
490-1351. 

POSITIONS STILL AVAIUBLE to 
type names and addresses from 
home. $500.00 per 1000. Call 1- 
900-896-1666 ($1.49 mln./18 yrs.-t-) 
or write: PASSE • Z3829. 161 S. 
Lincolnway, N. Aurora. IL 60542. 

MAJOR CORPORATION Expand- 
ing/seeking professionals with sales 
management or teaching 
experience. Training & support. Call 
491-3640. 

Federal government is hiring, from 
$16,000 to $62,000 per year. Amaz- 
ing 24 hr. recorded message 
reveala details. 804-825-1044, ext. 
185, Including Sundays. 

CO-AUTHOR & TYPIST for histori- 
cal romance novel. Must be inter- 
ested in writing fiction & non-fictton. 
$5 to $8 per hour, plus publishing ft 
movie rights. 480-4704, leave 
message. 

HELP WANTED-Cable T.V. 
Commission. Top pay. must have 
own car. Call 10-5 p.m. Mon.-Frl. 

539-3451. ext. 109. 

JOB SEEKERS-Construction 
workers needed. All phaaes. 1-800- 
330-9335. No tea. IRC, Inc. 

AUTO SALES PEOPLE 
THERE IS ANOTHER UFEi 

You can have more freedom, much 
higher commlsston ft real growth 
opportunity. All this ft more selling a 
product that Is euler to aell at laea 
than 1/2 the price of a ear. I know, I 
sold cars too. Call Bob Foreman 
490-2422. 

AIRLINE CREW 
TO $10 HOUR 

Will train. 461-1148. Jobs Plus. Mb 
listir^ servtee. Only $40 fee. 



WRTTOi 

Looking tor a job (hat appreoiiaat you 
for your hard work A loyal^? 
\M EBA (how you the way. 
•Job Security 

• PM Vacalkm 

• Super Bonus & Incertflve Programs 

• Advancement Opportunitiei ^om 
WHhin 

Immedntt opening* are avaiabte tor 

indhMduM potMS^ good 

oommunicalion tl^ m^ fuH taining 

provided. 

If interesied ori klrs. WtougM^. 

49S-S701 



HELP WANTED 



SALES REPRESENTATIVE 

An authorized AT&T security sys- 
tems dealer, kxated in Hampton, 
seeks professional, ambitious, 
career-minded individuals im- 
mediately to work southside 
territory. Opportunity to advance into 
management and grow with young 
firm. Contact Ray Baker 625-0371. 



HOBBIES 



STERUNG MEADOWS FARM 

Quality horses, priced to sell. Indoor 
and outdoor riding arena's. English 
and Western riding lessons 
available. Boarding, full-care facility. 
471-2133. 




PUNGO-3 yr. old house on U 
acres, pool -f many extrasi 
$138.900.721-7865. 

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY. VA-3 
bedroom ranch. 1 1/2 bath, 
enclosed porch, full cellar, central 
air, washer ft dryer, 2 1/2 acres, 
workshop. 2 car garage, 2 out- 
bulMlnga, above ground swimming 
pool, small orchard ft garden. Taxes 
about $300. $98,500. 804-736- 
6012. 

FAIRFIELD-Condo. $64,500. Great 
buy. 2 bedroom. 2 1/2 bath, 
fireplace. Call 496-1104 weekdaya. 
496-2772 weekends. 



INSTRUCTION 



BARTENDINQ 

A NEW CAREER 

International bartending Institute 
Call 497-6700 for more Info. 



JOBS WANTED 



HOUSESnrrCR-AVAIUBLE 
7/15 Professional seeks long-term 
position. References 1-442-7862. 



LIVESTOCK 



PASSIER DRESSAGE SADDLE. 
17". 2 yr. Excellent condltten, must 
sell to buy sMe saddle. Paid $2,500. 
sacrifkM $800. Mk:helle 482-0153. 



MISC. FOR SALE 



URINE-ERASE guarantees removal 
urine stains, odors, from carpets. 
Regardless stain agel 24 hr. toll free 
Information. Reldell Chemicals 
Limited 1-800-56-ERASE. 

HAPPY JACK TRIVERMICIDE: 
Recognized safe ft effective by U.S. 
Center for Veterinary Medicine 
agains hook, round & tapeworms in 
dogs ft cats. Available 0-T-C at IN- 
DUSTRIAL MBWE. ft SPLY. 543- 
2232. 

HAPPY JACK FLEA GARD: All met- 
al patented device controls fleu In 
the home without PESTICIDES or 
EXTERMINATORS. Results 
overnight. INDUSTRIAL HOWE ft 
SPLY 543-2232. 

SUMMERS ONE DAY SPECIAL 
Designer perfume/cotogne paralels. 
$17.50 each. 3.3 ounces. Pembroke 
Mali-Sunday-Ona day, all day. Red 
for men. Obsesak>n for men. Eter- 
nity for men and the list goes on. 
Eariy bird discounts. NEAR CHICK- 
FILET 

ORIENTAL CARPETS-10 x 20' Red 
Oriental Carpet. $180 or best offer. 
363-8638. 

KENMORE WASHER ft DRYER- 
Excellent condition, can 
demonstrate, delivery possible. 
$100 each. 456-5725. 



OUT OF TOWN 



APPOMATOX-20 si^e horse farm; 4 
bedroom, Ckpe Cod, full baaement. 
Ntee barn, crosa fenced, next to 
rtate forest. $137,500. 1-e46-eaS6. 

APPOMATOX-26 acrea, 1,600 ft. 
river frontage. Huge treea. high 
bluffa. 10 acrea open. $41,000. 
Owner financing with $4,000 down. 
1-846-8256. 



Best Fan **°^^ 
Round Trip TOKYO 

JAPAN WAVEL SERVICE. INC. 

1-800-822-3336 



PERSONALS 



SURROGATE MOTHERS 
WANTED-Fee plus expenses for 
canying a couple's child. Must be 
18-35 and previously had a child. 
Steve Litz. Atty. (317) 996-2000. 

ADOPTION-Happy, dependable 
couple, k)ves chikJren and wants to 
adopt a baby. We are a family doc- 
tor and spouse, capable of provkfing 
a secure, toving home. Willing to 
pay legal ft medcal expanses. Call 
Hamet ft Davkl toll-free at home 1- 
800-484-7622 'Security Code 
4428.' 

"COURSE IN MIRACLES" 

Overview seminar July 25th. 3 
major concepts to be discussed. 
Pre-registration/cost. 463-2922. 

LOVING CHILDLESS COUPLE 
WISHES to adopt infant. We are 
emotionally, financially & socially 
prepared to add a precious child to 
our lives. Let's help each other. Call 
Ralph & Joanne collect anytime. 
(703)698-8917. 

ADOPTION: Give your baby full- 
time parenting, a happy opportunity- 
filled future, and a large loving ex- 
tended family. Let's help each other. 
Call Julie/Stan collect 703-503- 
9434. 

ADOPTION: OUR ADOPTED 
DAUGHTER wants a brother/sister 
and we want to finish our family. 
Can pay legal/medlcal. Call Lynn or 
Steve collect 703-425-6932. 

Couple with tots of love seeks new- 
born to share secure home and 
happiness. Will help wKh expenses. 
Ivy and Dennis 703-39,1-9517 
(Collect). ^ 

ADOPTION 
Loving couple wishes to adopt baby. 
Legal and medical expenses paid. 
Please call Ginny and Bill collect at 
703-241-8165. 

ADOPTION: OUR ADOPTED 
DAUGHTER wants a brother/sister 
and we want to finish our family. 
Can pay logal/medk:al. Call Lynn or 
Steve collect 703-408-3701. 

ADOPTION-YOUNG CHILDLESS 
COUPLE wishes to give a baby a 
happy and secure future. Lots of 
love from a full-time mom and 
devoted dad. Legal/medlcal paid. 
Call collect CheryMand Chris 703- 
817-9884. 

ATTRACTIVE DWF fN 40*8 would 
like male companionship for 2 
weeks in Virginia Beach. Call 490- 
9147, ask for Fay. Must have good 
morals. 



l*feTS 



KNOW WHAT HAPPENS TO 
FLEAS ft ticks when sprayed with 
HAPPY JACK DROP DEAD FLEA- 
TICK MIST? They drop daadi For 
dogs ft cats. Water based. IN- 
DUSTRIAL HOME ft SUPPLY. 543- 
2232. 

CAIRN TERRIOR-MALE 

9 mos. old with papers. Wheatan in 
cotor. Asking $250 negotiable. Call 
423-6544. 

AQUARIUM SET UPS-2 complete. 
55 gal. $200; 30 gal. $90. Diatom 
filter, needs few small parts $30. 
340-1301. 

AKITA PUPPIES 
Gorgeous coloring ft sN>w quality. 
1st shots, vet checked. Starting at 
$750. Must see to appreciate. If no 
answer, please leave measage, 
473-8364. 

COCK-A-TOO - White 2 1/2 yr. okJ 
male. Cage/perch. Needs lots of 
attention. Call 471 -9627. 



REAL ESTATE 



CHOWAN RIVER-NC. Restaurant 
with oyster bar, (2,880 sq. ft.). 2 , 
story, 3 bedroom. 1 1/2 bath 
resMentlal, 1,800 sq. ft. A 13 slip 
boat house, 30 space campground, 
beach & gas pier situated on 7 1/2 
acres. $420.000. 919-358-3901. 

FOR $46,500 YOU CAN OWN A 2 
BR, 1 BA in Freen Run w/brand new 
carpet. 3 pattoa and aH appUanees. 
471-7704. 

If you have something you want to 
sell, let the dasslfieda do It for you. 
Call 547-4571 today. 



1991SimdlBii8ine« 
of the Year! 



>825F!raMhbM 

• 24 Yean Bspcrloca 

• Rastorttkw aad 

CiMniiV Scrvke Mmfcmeat 

•Craiplete Tralalai, 

Invefltory ad Sopport 

• $34400 w/$15K Down 

by Praspcctas Only 



Slid S2(t '>5S0 



farol R9mllngs * Attmlog^ • Look Into Your Future 

1-900-454-1444 $1.79 per minute 

1-80&-9»-5580 InfoiC.C. 



REAL ESTATE 



77.605 ACRES. 3 PARCELS 

Owner financing available for home^ 
and horses. 

QREEN RUN-VA. BEACH 

Charminglll 2 story, 4 bedroom, 2 1/ 
2 baths. Garage, fence, well 
landscaped w/dedc on back. 
SUFFOLK DUPLEX 

Excellent rental history & income. 
Only 7 years old. 

AHOY ACRES " 

Super deal III 3 bedroom. 2 baths, 
ranch on large tot. VA assumable. 
Owner anxtous. 

For more information contact: Mar- 
garet Lee 474-9392. 

VA. BEACH-Furnished 3 bedroom, 
Chesapeake Bay. Summer weekly 
rental. 467-3304/481-6513. 

BAYVIEW-Furnished or 

unfurnished, utilities included, 
phone. $65 per week. 588-2855. 



RENTALS 



ODU STUDENTS-NEXT TO SOC- 
CER FIELD- 

Large, modern. 4 bedroom. 2 bath, 
laundry room, tounge ft kitchen. 
489-0349. 

17TH BAY ST-2 BEDRM. 

On the water, modern, 1 1/2 bath, 
washer/dryer. $475. 497-7855 or 
480-8356. ■ 

SHORES OF LAKE SMITH APTS. 
1 bedroom. $395; 2 bedroom. $495; 
3 bedroom. $515. Call 464-2911. 

BAKER ORAD-Lovely 2 bedroom, 
free washer-dryer. Free heat. Very 
special. Great location. $515. 
Deposit $200. 490-0056 9-6. 

NORFOLK ft PORTSMOUTH 

NICE A CLEAN. FREE 

telephone ft basto cable. Washer ft 

dryer. Utilities included ft fully 

furnished. Only $75 wk. 623^89. 



ROOMMATES 



CHURCHLAND 

Female with same. Near 1-664. 
Great area. 3 bedroom house, air, 
large yard. $250. 483-0933/393- 
8481. 

ROOMMATE-To share house rent. 
$390 plus utilities. Male/female. 3 
bedroom, spactous yard. No pets. 
No kids. Digital pager 552-1359. 



RVS 



CAMPER-'92 VACATION AIR 

Must sell due to stokness. 30', front 
kit., air, awning, full bath, large 
bedroom/queen bed. Must seel 
Priced to sell. 491-7669. 



TRAVEL 



DISCOUNT CRUISES-Save 10 - 
50%. Call for dates ft ships. 3 ft 4 
nite Bahamas. 7 nite Caribbean. 
DEERWOOD TRAVEL. Lie. ft 
Bonded. 1-600-444-0044. 



WATERFRONT 



LAKE GASTON. NC 

WATERFRONT HOMES ft LOTS 

CALL FOR INFORMATION. 7 

DAYS. 

SUN SET REALTY 

1-800-333-3297. 



INaTAirr caw paid for •nttques, 
AH Idnda. WID come to you. 



VENDING/LOCAL 

$2 - $5,000 per month 

possible. Buy now and 

grow rich. 

1-800-723-7800 



Hoiuli'd - J & L - liiMiiiMJ 

CARPET CLEANERS 



PHONE: 491-9198 



^ Lufgtrimu 
SljHOiments & Tbrimfumsts 

Jitness Center. 

year round Spa & Sauna, 

lenms Courts 

& (Putting grun 

Open ^aify 9-6; Sun 116 

On Providence Road 2 Ml. 



W.o<Milil«yW^wey 

424-7867, 



tfh 



10 Virginia Beach Sun. Wwlnesday. July 1. 1992 

Beach Girl Scouts earn high awards 



W ANN LESTER 

Spedal to TTw Viri^ia BMd) Sun 

Senior GiH Scouts Donna Dom- 
Maitin and Jennifer Johnson, of 
Girl Scout Troq) 447, have earned 
the Gold Award, Girl Scouting's 
highest girl award. Cadette Girl 
SoNit Kimon Dom-Maitin of troqp 
911 recdved the Silver Award, the 
second highest giri award. 

Students at Green Run High 
School, Dom-Martin, 1993 senior 
and Johnson, a 1992 graduating se- 
nior, worked together on a Gold 
Awiud project, creating safety video 
and program for presentation to el- 
ementary school students and to 
younger Girl Scouts. Dom-Martin's 
and Johnson's goal for the project 
was to provide a safer environment 
for "latch key" childrai. 

Kimon Dom-Martin will be a 



ninth grado^ at Kempsville Junior 
High School. She assisted a visu- 
ally impaired Girl Scout at an 
overnight Girl Scout program, 
helping her participate and earn her 
Girl Scout swimming badge. 

Gold and Silver Awards recognize 
Senior and Cadette Giri Scouts for 
their outstanding efforts in Girli 
Scouting. Developing and carrying' 
out their own special projects, girls 
work toward these awards. They 
build skills, develop leadership, ex- 
plore careers, give community ser- 
vice and learn about themselves. 

The Girl S<;»ut Council of Colo- 
nial Coast, a United Way agency, 
serves more than 16,200 girls and 
has more than 5,300 adult volun- 
teers in southeastern Virginia and 
northeaston North Carolina. 



BY ORDER OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 




Left to right: Kimon 
Jennifer Jofinson. 




EVERYTHING! 




ROSES ALREADY LOW, LOW PRICES 



Mayor Meysra E. CX)erndorf recently presented a proclama- 
tion to Charles S. Welden, administrator of Beth Sholom Home 
of Eastern Virginia. (Photo by Carole Arnold) 

City observes nursing home week 

Virginia Beach Mayor Meyera Obemdorf recently issued the 
following proclamation: Whereas: our community's citizens 
now residing in nursing facilities have contributed greatly to 
the traditions we in Virginia Beach have conie to cherish; 
Whereas: the staff and community volunteers who are advo- 
cates for residents in nursing facilities continue to demon- 
strate their collective opmntitment to provide a high quality 
of care and life for residents; Whereas: families and friends 
of residents are appreciative for the care and effort provided 
their loved ones by staff and community volunteers in nurs- 
ing facilities; and, Whereas: the Beth Sholom Home of Eastem 
Virginia for more than a decade has provided exemplary 
nursing facility services to citizens of Virginia Beach and the 
surrounding cities and communities. Now, therefore, I, 
Meyera E. Oberndorf, mayor of the city of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, do hereby proclaim: May 10 through 16, 1992, as 
National Nursing Home \Neek in the Virginia Beach commu- 
nity and urge all citizens to join in the observance by visiting 
nursing facility residents and setting aside some special time 
to learn -about long-term care and the tradition of caring that 
nursing facilities have established. 



City wins livabiiity award 



D Contlnuad From Paga 3 

is the key to rehatulitating the 
community. 

Several communities have beea 
a\Ac to establish Ndghborhood As- 
sistance Stnkt Delivery Annex 
Offices. Space is donated by the 
management or homeowners. The 
office is used by the community 
police officen, municipal staff and 
residents. It is a focal point within 
the community that tells residents 
that we care about our quality of 
life. 

The eCfe(^veness of the CARE. 
committee cannot \» measured by 
convention^ means. Success can 
be measured by die appearance of 
children now playing outside, 
residents' percqition of personal 
safety in die neighborhood and an 
increased number of reported 
crimes within the community, 
which shows a higher trust level for 
the police among residents. 

lie paitnership between the resi- 
dents, police and C.AJI.E. is the 
key to {Boviding the necessary 
framework for community r^iabili- 
tation and self-sufficiency. 



I firmly believe that the C.A.R.E. 
committee is die miswer to rehabili- 
tating high-risk neighborhoods. As 
we restore a community's confi- 
dence, we also restore their desire 
tpchftoge things from within. The 
true measiae of success for the 
C.A.R.E. committee will be when 
the cranmunities no Imger need tte 
committee because they have 
l)ecome self-sufficient in meeting 
their own needs. 

The pitot community for the 
CA.R.E. conunittee is rapidly be- 
coming self-sufficient. They have 
learned how to acc^s municipal 
services and to meet their needs on 
their own. They are a united com- 
munity committed to continually 
improving their quality of life. 

The C.A.R£. committee helps 
Virginia Beach maintain the lowest 
crime rate in the country for a city 
our size. We are very proud of the 
woric of the CARE, committee. 
And we are very proud that our city 
was selected as a first place 
Livabiiity Award winner. 

This article was compiled 
through the courtesy of Helen 
Spore, Public I/tformation Office, 
city cf Virginia Beach. 



Fathers important to family unit 



STOREWIDE 
SAVINGS!! 

V/S, STEREOS, VCRS, CAMCORDERS. 
MICROWAVES, SMALL APPLIANCES, 
PHONES, CLXmimG TOR THE ENTIRE 
FAMILY. HOUSEWARES, DOMESTICS, 
HOME FURNISHINGS, WATCHES ft 
JEWELRY, TOYS, SPORTING GOODS, 
HARDWARE. GARDEN ft PATIO 
SUPPUES, AtrrOMOTIVE SUPPUES 
ftLOTSMOREI 



BRAND NAME 
MERCHANDISE!! 

MAGNA>K)X, 6E. SAMSUNG, RCA, 
GOLDSTAR, EMERSON. JENSEN, 
WEST BEND. MR. COFFEE, BLACK ft 
DECKER, HANES. LEE, SOUTHERN 
CLASSICS, DUNDEE, 
RUBBERMAID. NINTENDO, GAME 
BOY, MURRAY ft SUNBEAM TO 
NAMEJUSTAFEWI 
MANUPACTUim'SWARRANTIM 1 
VALID ON ALL Al^mCABLI ITEMSfl 



EVERY PRICE 
CUT 20% 

Evary Hmn In Mock wtN b* dIacouMrt 20% 

•I th* ragMwa, (Mn IhoM slrMdy martwd down) 

QumiMm HmHMl te Mock on hatd. 

No rab^iw, txclwnQM, fslndMcks. inlR oouponft, . 

5r. CItizan dttoountt or Room Sal* Prte* 

Guarantsa. Sony, no paraonal cli ack a . 

ALL SALES FINAL! 

Tha Shoa Dapaitmant to NOT going out of 
buataiaaa but IS partkHpaUng In IMa aala. 



Continusd From Paga 3 

that could be part of the solution. 
Somehow, our society must begin 
to put more emphasis on how 
important the father's contributicm 
is both fuuincially and emotionally. 
We also must educitte young men 
on dieir responsibilities as fathers. 

If it is accurate that between 
100,000 and 200,000 babies are 
bom each year U) fathers between 
die ages of IS and 19, we can see 
the need to begin evly in educating 



our youth about all the responsibili- 
ties of paroidiood. Better still 
woukl be educating diem to delay 
becoming parents until diey could 
be emotionally and financially 
responsible fw Uieir children. 

Unfortunately. I don't have any 
really good answers to Uiese prob- 
lems. I have only die disturHng sta- 
d^ics to r^XKt. But if we begin to 
opoily discuss die i»oblem, maybe 
togedier we can find solutions 
b<^ore uxby's young children 
become pan of tomorrow's juvenile 
crime stadAics. 



AARP to meet; Gunn awarded 



SHOP REGULAR STORE HOURS . . . HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION! 



ONLY AT THESE SELECTED STORES 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

Arrowhead Plaza Shopping Center 
5612 Princess Anne Road 

ITS BUSINESS-AS-USUAL AT OTHER ROSES DISCOUNT STORES 



SALE CONDUCTED BY NASSI-BERNSTEIN COMPANY INC. AS AGENT 



By MAURY BAILEY 
Special to The Virginia Bea^ Siwi 

The Great Neck- Virginia Beach 
Chapter of the Amoican Associa- 
tion of Retired Persons will meet 
on Tuesday, July 7 at 7 p.m. at die 
Great Neck Commimity Recreation 
Center, 2541 Shoretova Drive. 

Dr. Leann Lin-Shanghai, will 
give a |8esentuion on Tai Oii. die 
artofrdaxation. 

A representative lirom die Vir- 
ginia Beach pMic heaUh systrati 
will be present to provide fiee bkxid 
pre^ure and w^ht iestii^. 

Also, at die May meeting. Max 



Gunn - CDR, USN, retired, was 
awarded die chapter's Outstanding 
Service Award in recognition of his 
volunteering efforts in several 
communities. Jim Ramborger, 
pteadeal, present^] the awod after 
describing a list of community en- 
deavors in which Max is involved: 
consultant - Taxaide for the elderly; 

consultant - Medicare- Medicaid 
(MMAP) for the elderly; doccnt - 
Mariner's Museum in Newport 
News; monber - Virginia Beach 
Clean Community Commission; 
volunteer - Meals on Wheels; and 
driver - Red Cross Blood Servic*. 



CJjt Jeter^bur^ monitor's 



.Iiilv thru A II mist 




to HISTORIC 

PETERSBURG 



hmnk 







U.S.S.S.A. SAYS "PLAY BALL 



ff 



The United States Slo-Pitch Softball Association (USSSA) is responsible for the 
administration of 100,000 teams and 1 5,000 umpires. 



Q 



I oftball Sensations. . . Seeing that fly 
ball sail over the fence for a home run... 
Cringing at the crack of the bat when it 
meets the bail with unbelievable force. . . 

Getting a gritty taste of dust as the runner 
slides into home... 

Catching a faint whiff of leather as that 
well-wom glove stretches to envelope a 



flyball descending to earth ... 

Feeling the muscles strain as your finger- 
tips grip the ball then instaneously release 
aiming toward a double-play at first base. . . 

Two million men, women, and youth ex- 
perience these sensations first-hand when 
they annually compete in organized amateur 
slo-pitoh Softball. Without question, softball 
is America's most popluar team sport 

See|M(e9farfiary 



Welcome to Petersburg 





|ome to Peta:sbufg for a slice of hi.story, seved up southern 
styte. Three ceoturies of America's story arc told here, starting with 
the estiU)UsJMn(?nt of a wilderness outpt)8t along the falls of tlw 
Aj^matiox River in 1645. Petersburg thrived as a center of 
commerce. 

So important did ttic town become 
UiM it was twice occupied by hostile 
, troops, first In 1 78 1 by British regu- 
lars aod then in 1 865 alter a ten month 
siege by Federal forces. Military his- 
tory buffs flo<.;kto the National Battlc- 
fl^d here to recount tlie Battle of the 
Crater, the rc«jU of a darling plot by 
Federal troops to Wow up Confeder- 
jtfe lortificWions. 

Vi^KM$eageady ^ekout ti)t Appommax iron Works, a surviving 
4i^^ of bttr rich industrial past 

- Asa {]dw» 1^ sampllQg hisiXMy, Petcr^rg is uoparalled. But its 
hO«^tality is legend too. 

Otff dty boa.sLs the lavii^ hom^olbarons of commerce wbo made 
fortunes bexe and played host to 1'rerfdents. 

TlB city's architectural treasures include Blandford Church, the 
Siege Museum and the odd-angled Trapezium House. 

Among tiie mxA revered k Centre Hill Mansion, whidh has 
mirrored the changing tastes of the affluent since its completion in 
1 823. Also of great local significance is the First BajAist Church on 
HarrisOTi Street, home to die nation's oldest Alrican-Amfirican 
Coogregation, formed in 174(). 
Shap{ihgis a favorite patime too. A 
stroU through Old Towne satisfies 
every preference for antique galler- 
ies, boudques, craft shqps and one- 
of-a-kind restaurants. 

Peter^iu'g is convenient to other 
his^wic sites in Virginia and to your 
travel routes 

Spend the day here, or make it your 
base of operations for tours of 
Williamsburg, the James River flan- 
taiioos, Thomas Jefferson's 
Monticello and University of Vir- 
ginia, or Civil War battlegrounds. 
Whatever your plans, come indulge 
your appctitie for history in Peters- 
burg. 



m 



INSIDE 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 3 

RESTAURANT DIRECTORY 2 

MAP 6 

HISTORIC SITES 7 

U.S.S.S.A 9 



2 Gmdc Wednesday. July 1. 1992 




CONTINENTAL 

ANNABELLE'S 
2733 Paik Avenue 
732-0997 

FRENCH BESTY & 
APPOMATTOX TAVERN 

20 W.OU Street 732-8888 

HERO'S (HoUday Inn) 
E. Washington St & I-9S 
73J-0730 

HONEYBEE'S PANCAKE 
HOUSE A STEAKS 

3307S.CnierR(MKi 
732p1325 

PONDEROSA STEAK 
HOUSE 

3270 S.CraiBr Road 
862-9636 

RUMOURS RESTAURANT 
A LOUNGE (Ramda Inn) 

380EWasliii^g«nSL 
73W)000 

STEAK A ALE 

500 EWydie Street 
861-5993 



ITALIAN 

ALEXANDER'S ataUan & 

Greek) 

101 W. Bank St 

733-7134 

MAD ITALIAN 

2545 S. Crater Road 
732-9268 

PIZZA HUT 

3206 S. Crater Road 
861-3519 

ROMA'S RESTAURANT 

2447 County Mve 
861-0414 

SAL'S ITALIAN 

RESTAURANT 

Otter Road A S^annore Streets 
861-9191 

HOME STYLE & 
SOUL FOOD 



COUNTY 
RESTAURANT 

2444 County Drive 
732-3015 



LINE 



DIXIE RESTAURANT 

250N. Sycamore Street 
732-5761 

DOT'S RESTAURANT 

2102 W. Washington Street 
732-9409 

FARMER'S MARKET 

9 E. Old Street 
732-3378 

MATTHEW'S AND 

COMPANY 

Winner Black Heritage Award 

"Cooking The Way Mama Did 

It" 

137 N. Sycamore Street 

732-4409 

ROXIE'S (Flagship bin) 
815 S. Crater Road 
861-3470 



ORIENTAL 

CANTON RESTAURANT 

950 S. Sycamore Street 
732-6441 



CHINA EXPRESS 

2817 County Drive 
733-0199 

GOLDEN tHINA 

RESTAURANT 

1712 E. Washington Street 
861-5350 

HUNAN PALACE (Best 
Western Hotel) 

405 E. Washingtrai Street 
732-2331 

LEE'S EXPRESS 

21 W. Washington Street 
732-5337 



FAMILY 

AUNT SARAH'S PANCAKE 
HOUSE 

406 E. Washington Street 
732-5411 

HOWARD JOHNSON'S 

E. Washington Street & 1-95 
732-5950 

SHONEY'S 

2535 S. Crater Road 
732-3454 



CHICKEN 

CHURCH'S FRIED 
CHICKEN 

1228 S. Sycamore Street 
732-7333 

GOLDEN SKILLET FRIED 
CHICKEN 

1228 W. Washington Street 
732-4425 

KENTUCKY FRIED 
CHICKEN (3 Localioni) 

2716 S. Craier Road 732-0613 

1927 E Washo^ton Street 732- 

0613 

1315 W. WaslungtOB Street 

732-4267 

FAST FOOD 

ARBrS RESTAURANT 

3300 S.CMBr Road 

732-2265 

BURGER KING (2 

LocatloH) 

2730 S. Crater Road 861-0170 

1910 E. Washington Street 743- 

1315 



Experience 
What 

6 Million Spectators, 
2 Million Pla} ers, 
100,000 Teams And 
15.000 Umpires 
Already Feel... 
... Softball 
Sensations. 




USSSA 



UNITED STATES SLO-PITCH SOFIBALL ASSOOAnON 
HALL OF FAME MUSEUM 



HOURS 



MONDAY -FRIC^Y 

9 AM TIL 4PM 

SATURDAY 

11AMTIL4PM 

SUNDAY 
1PM TIL 4 PM 



ADMISSION 



ADULTS $iJso 

STUDENTS 41 00 

SENIOR aTlZENS $1^00 

CHILDREN UNDER 12..*.. FREE 



3935 South Crater Road, 

Petersburg, Virgiiiia 

1-95 Exit 47 

Minutes f rnm Rlchmnnd 



Guide. Wednesday, July 1, 1992 3 



Summer Calender 

1992 



JULY 



EXHIBIT. Creations by the Windsor Wood Carvers 
and Crushed Pecan Shell Folk Art by Mrs. Royd, 
Sculptor. Miles B. Carpenter Museum. Wavcrly, 
Va. Open daUy 2-5 PM. Closed Tues. & Wed. 804/ 
834-2151 or 804/834-2969. July 1 thru Aug. 30 

"TINTYPES". Swift Creek MiU Playhouse. Musi- 
cal Review based around the "Gay 1890's For 
dinner and theatre reservations call 748-5203. July 
3thraSepL30 

HNDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION. 

Food, crafts, entertainment and much more. Up to 
20,000 spectators. 12 noon until fireworks at night 
A band will perform until midnight. Ft. Lee, VA For 
more information contact Rodney Smith, 732-7105/ 
734-4195 or Jayne Thacker 743-2882. July 4 

4TH OF JULY EXTRAVAGANZA. Red, white 
and blue fun at this popular celebration. Entertain- 
ment provided with the day climaxing with a ^c- 
tacular fireworks display. 6-10 PM. Chesterfield 
County Fairgrounds. Free. 748-1623. July 4 

USSSA. Men's Industrial... Tri-Cities. Call USSA 
Headquarters for more information. 732-4099. July 
4&5 

USSSA. Cockade City Men's Class "B"... Peters- 
burg. Call USSA Headquarters for more informa- 
tion 732-4009. July 4 & 5 

USSSA. Cockade City's Men's Class "C"... Pfctere- 
burg. Call USSA Headquarters for more informa- 
tion. 732-4009. July 4 & 5 

USSSA. Dudley/Tom Hunter Memorial Class "A", 
"B" & "C" National Invitational Tournament ... 
Petersburg. Call USSA Headquarters for more 
information. 732-4099. July 10-12 

USSSA. Virginia Industrial State Championship ... 
Petersburg Call USSA Headquarters for more 
infonnation.732-4009. July 17-19 

USSSA. Virginia Church State Tournament ... 
Colonial Heights. Call USSA Headquarters for 
more information. 732-4009. July 18 

USSSA. Petersburg Class "B"... Petersburg. Call 
USSA Headquarters for more information. 732- 
4099. July 18 & 19 

EXHIBIT. Member's Exhibit Petersburg Area Art 
League. 13 Rock Street 861-4611. 861-4611. July 
22 thru Sept 3 



USSSA. Dudley/Men's Major National Invita- 
tional Tournament ... Petersburg. Call USSA 
Headquarters for more information. 732-4099. 

"^"" AUGUST 

"■nNTTYPES". Swift Creek Mill Playhouse. 
*See July 3 for description. August 1-31 

USSSA. Hospitality Association/Central Vir- 
ginia Class "S" Area Sate Tournament ... Peters- 
burg. Call USSA Headquarters for more infor- 
mation. 732-4099. August 7-9 

USSSA. Central Virginia Class "D" Area 
Tournament ... Hopewell/Colonial Heights. Call 
USSA Headquarters for more information. 732- 
4099. August 7-9 

USSSA. Virginia USSSA Men's Class "B" State 
Championship ... Petersburg Call USSSA 
Headquarters for more information. 732-4099. 
732-4099. August 14-1« 

USSSA. AID/Virginia-North Carolina Open 
and Class "A" Championship ... Petersburg. Call 
USSSA Headquarters for more information. 
732-4099. August 14-16 

USSSA. Virginia USSSA Neb's Class "C Sate 
Championship ... Petersburg Call USSSA 
Headquarters for more information. 732-4099. 
August 21-23 

USSSA. Virginia USSSA Class "D" State 
Championship ... Petersburg. Call USSSA 
Headquarters for more information. 732-4099. 
August 21-23 

This calender of Events is printed quarterly and 
produced by the Petersburg E)epartment of 
Tourism for the convenience of area citizens 
and guest to the Tri-Cities are. If you have 
information about events that are of interest to 
the general public, please mail information to: 
Calender jof Events, Petersburg Visitors Center, 
P.O. Box 2107, Petersburg, Virginia 23804. 

Information should include: Name of Event 
sponsors, location, dates, times, cost description 
of event contact person, and telephone number. 
Information should be sent before deadline date. 

DEADLINE DATE 
CALENDER TO RECEIVE INFORMATION 

December-February (Wmtcr) October 15 

March-May (Spring) January 15 

June-August (Summer) April 15 

September-November (Fall) July 15 



4 Guide, yedng^y, July 1. 1992 




tetersbuil 
Sstaurant Guide 




GmL from p^2 . 

HARDEE'S (4 Locations) 

2135 County Drive 733-2125 

1865 S. Crater Road 861-6315 

2010 E. Washington Street 862- 

2018 

100 W. WashingUHi Street 862- 

2241 

MCDONALD'S (2 Locations) 
Walnut HiU Plaza 861-0655 
460 & Wagner Road Inlersectira 

TACO BELL 

3219 S. Crater Road 
861-2073 

WENDY'S OLD 

FASmONED 

HAMBURGERS 

1859 S.Cr^CT Road 
861-2073 

CAFES 

GLOBE CAFE 

201 N. Sycamofe Street 
732-2222 

OLDE TOWNE CAFE 

21 Old Street 
732-5100 



YANKEE COFFEE SHOP 

(Bieali:£Kt&Lundi) 

2557-BS.CtatCTRoad 

861^t490 

BARBEQUE 

KING'S BARBEQUE 

2910 S. Crater Road 

732-0975 

KING'S BARBEQUE 

3321 W. Washington Street 

732-5861 



^V* 



iorVcAlr^ 



W 



""Qj 



Vk Show You The 
Battlefields .... 

"W Richfiiond Btttkfidd Ifaur 
^ ^tcrtbut( Step Tour 

All iDurt include Jmci River phnutioni 
Hid Rid m i o i i d nkylinc 

1 - 800 -V A -BY-AIR 




Th« Troops 

Petersburg is steeped in history. The siege of Peteisburg » one of ttie most famous 
events. Visitors have a wide variety of Museum and atb'actions concerning this era 
irtcluding The Siege Museum and the Petersburg Nationed Battiefieid. See page 7 for 
details 



The Petersburg Monitor 

"Taking A Stand For Petersburg" 

To Subscribe Call 733-8636 




pLAGSHIP 

= Inns 



Adjacent to 
Petersburg National Battlefield 



• Free Breakfast special / with room 
•Free HBO &CabelT.V. 

• In room refrigerator 

• Swimming Pool 

• Easy walking distance to Battle of the Crater and 
Blandfwi Church 

Locally owned and operated 
814 S. Crater Rd. Petersburg, VA 

(804) 861-3470 




Guide. Wednesday. Julv 1. 1992 5 



Visit Petersburg's charming Old Towne 

Antiques Galore .•• and much, much more 




'srufe- ' 



^^£ A^g^ 



Old Towne Association Members 



L VWlM'i Ccalcr (804) 733-2400 

X Hi«i« T«iKli — 409 Cockide Alky — Faciay OuU« 

Active Wear. Oafts, Suijpliei ft Ywns (804) 733-798S 
X F«»u 't Mwfctt — 9 Ban Old Street — Resttunuit «ad 

NigblCfaib (804)732-3243 
4 NMAeiMika — 7 East Old Street — Needle Alts and 

Hrani^ (804) 861-0528 
5. Yc Qfc QhM Skappe — 7 East Old Street — (joilti^ 

SuRpKei. Oann (804) 73^S848 
4, PMmbac Aim Alt LrMgM Gaiety LMatfan — 1 3 

Rock Skcct. Aa Affiliale of (he Vii|iaia Muraem of Fine 

A(K (804) 861-4611 
7.rinaaMgMiniilMi,liM— 5 East Old Street— 

Pkailaas aMi HeatiaB SqppUo (804) 732-877 1 
& AaMfw lai OMi^ Skap - 1 West Old Street — 

Aaericu Aaliiiues. CoDectiHes, Jewdry, Coiiu (804) 733- 

7437 
9. Waaiy't AaiivMa — 3 A 7 West OM Street — Special! z- 

iag ia Aadqaes. CollectMes of ill types (804) 861 -9642 
Ml Canaad AHliqMt — S West Old Street — 8,000 sq. feet 

of aflbnUble aati^ies including Dolls, Bean, Linens, 

Jewehy, Rnitare, etc. .. .(804) 861 -4536 
IL OM Twmc Cn Shop — 13 West OU Street — Dolls. 

Sleiff BcMt. CbOectibies, Souvenirs (804) 733-0223 
IX G«a4 OH Hbm* AolisM Md — 1 5 West Old Street - 

Amiqiws, Qdleciibies. Coins, Buy and Sell — 4 Dealers on 

Ptenues (804) 861-6387 
UlOliTMme AaUfacMd — 21 West Old Street — 25,000 

sq. Ceel • Antiques • Collectibles • Fivniture Restoratioa — 

Fknl A Intoior Design. DeU on Premse* (804) 732-5100 



14 OU Townt Dtii — In the Antique Mall — New York 
andVirginia Style Sandwiches (804) 733-6548 

15. N. Thomas Bacon Interiors — 23 West Old Stieet — 
Residential and Commacial Interior Design (804) 733-5257 

14 Vtti* — 25 West Old Street — Fine Ladies PippueVmA 
Accessories (804) 733-3199 

17. StMbo Red — 25-A West Old Street — Hill Service Salon 
for Men and Women (804) 862-REDI cr 862-7332 

18. King's Fabric Oirtlet — 410 North Market Street — Fabric 
and Fashions for H«iies (804) 732-3930 

19. Coin Exciiai«* of Vli|Wa — 106-B Old Sheet — Coins, 
Oimncy, Baseball Cards. Stamps (804) 861-6449 

19. The Petcnbari Monitor — 106 Old Street — Petersburg's 

newest weekly newspapo- (804) 733-8636 
24 AppoBiattox Iron Woriu — 20-28 West Old Street 

Industrial Heritage Park — See the Industrial Revolutioa 

come to Ufe! (804) 232-lRON 
21. IW Ghat I — 26 Old Street — Stained Glass Items: 

Soacatchers, Lampshades, Custom Orders, Supplies, 

Lessons (804) 861-3130 

21. Tkc AIW Company Store — 24 CMd Street — Cast and 
Wrought Iron Products; Toys, Books dealing with old 
teditnlogy, history and more. Interesting Gifts (804) 733- 
7404 

22. French Betsy Rcs«a«mni — Appomattox Tavern — 20-22 
Old Street — One of Virginia's finest restaurant. Wonderful 
Cuisine. Delightful Art Deco Tavern. 

23. Ikonias Fktdwr — 16 West Old Street — Purveyors of 
fancy gifts, jewelry and antique.'! (804) 733-8691 

24 Upholstery Workshop — 414 North Sycamore Street — 
Custom upholstery at reasonable prices (804) 862-4739 



25. EUnor MarahaH — 412 North Sycamore Street — Fine 
Women's Apparel, Accessories and Gifts (804) 861-5778 

24 Ladysmllh — 408 Noith Sycamore Street — Jewelry - 
Qistom, Conten^xrary, Antique, Fine Arts & Crafu Gallery 
(804) 862-3892 

27. MooM Brothers ninritnre — 4O0 North Sycamore Sneei 

— Petersburg's oldest home ftimishings center (804) 733- 
3337/796-6411 

28. Pewter Comer — 16 West Bank Street — Kirk-Stieff, 
Handcrafted Sculpture, Jewelry (804) 861-3635 

29. CM Towne Sporting Arms, Lid. — 16 West Bank Street 

— Buy-SeD-Trade Modem and Anique Weapons (804) 861- 
3635 

34 Alcnndcr'a Fine Food — 101 West Bank Street — 

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner — Greek • Italian • American 

Dishes (804) 733-7134 
• Cariogrqihk AiH — P.O. Box 2202, Petersburg, VA 

23804 — Antique Maps, Atlases, Travels, Histories and 

Geographies — (Not shown on map) Other Advertisers 

(804)861-6770 
31. the Ghibc CaTc — 201-203 North Sycamore Street — 

Antiques and Ait — Lunch Served — Call In and Cairy Out 

Service (804) 732-2222 
3Z Department of Toariam — 15 West Bank Street, 

Petersburg, VA 23803 1-800-368-3595 
33. Department of Economic DtvdopniciU — City Hall, 

Room 208, Petersburg, VA 23803 (804)733-2352 
34 The High Street Imi — 405 High Stteet — Victorian Bed 

and Breakfast (804) 733-0505 



ftieadly md ooarteau anliqiK dealers offer a wide variety of fine Amiiture, sparkling glasswve, 
eiegHl jewdiy, ■■vekMschiBa.aiid a wondetful assortment (tfunuaual and unique items. Featuied 
cc it c l MH iacfaide advotiaag items, dt^ ^potts trading cards, stamps nd coins, paper money, 
■edicae boOka, Md imlitvy inenutitdia Many of (he ^opi offer evetyday low prices, resulting in 
a owlady dii^^ «ock. Ia fad, Pdcnburg's CHd Towne is a mtcca for antique dealers traveling 
betanea New Ytrt ■«! Floiid4 who boy lo lewU at significantly hi^er fnoes. 

And yoal km (Nd Towae. We're ■ itfioul hatotic district and inost of ovbnldinp «e vchitecturd 
m nw i ii, dKiag Ctoa Ac eviy ISOirs. Maay of them have been extensively renovated and house 
irawicdil apecMy Aopi cffiering evtrydiiag from (iiie women's ckithiag uA compiele beauty 
■nrkea.lotKM l i ff . gKt wMesaBddecotatingaccessories.'ItoeisevenanupliotaayAop.afiMiiiture 
^ two fabric Aopi, and a woadeifii] intetior design studio. 



The AppooMttB bn Worts it as abnhileiy tednating iadustrial herila0e parte ■ the only one of iu 
kind ii te eatiie IMled States. K is a coB^dele foctory froalhe late 1 gOO'g; dcvei shops house over 
100 diffcRal aiachiBe*, an fiiDy opmtioul. "niere are two wood working shops, dvee machine sho|», 
a fonadry oonplet, blacksoMh shop, steam engine and mndi more. Kmnwiedgeabie tour guides 
adndy d ti Boatl r ale many of the machiaes. The AIW Ckm^nny Store dttm one of the widest 
sdediaH sf cast and wTooi^ iron products availaUe anywhere. 

The AIWs oiglad iteHi eagoe Aop haa btM corapleldy renovated and now houses the chwming 
Fnach Betqr ReMaanm - one of Viigiiaa'i fiaesL It dfers aa extensive variety of culiuiy deligfau al 



reasonable piices. Next door is the beautiful Appomattox Tavern for those in |he irnxxl for srnne high 
spirite. Akxaader's Restaurant offers spicy Italian and Greak meals. The Old Towne Deli offers both 
New York and traditional Virginia style sandwiches md snacks. Buih ii 1879, the original octagonal 
Fanner's Market c^ers luncheon buffets and evening enteitaininent. 

Peientog was OMler aege for tea months coring the a va War (the loogeal of any Americv City) Md 
Ifae Siege Museum potbayslifebehind the lines. The mysterious Itapezimn House hat iU^KMtlyl^eBd 
and elegant Center Hill Mansioa has been restored to itt former glory . Within a few miles ■« Peterabvg 
National BaUlefield Park; Blandford Ousdi, with iufamoai ooiectioa of Tiffany windows; the U.S. 
Army's (Quartermaster Museum at Fort Lee; and the United Stales Softbdl Assodalion Hall ^ Fame. 
Theie's lou to do, so plan CB spending at least oae fun day in (^ Towne. 

■niia«,Ti»A.».-^i»h-.w.^. >>.-^»^»-.. . .fy — -.. T '■-f " "tTmi ^rtpiM i l wl 

■•« rf Iki otiwr annctlMH •■< ipKWlT Mmt m tfM ata 4i7S I Mtk. IbiMrfi; llMk SMar^r >«■ !«■«( Ml Ma Hri 



Dnicnomt OMTnwIiN^ »ailaaHttiriMiiM4,lMi hw MMlu«ir»riMtiMI<IS.Miivl; ro«m Ike lita rival* 
Ik TbwM VWHr t>Mr iMtM SI *• Im4 rfOU SUM. 

ACC(mMOIMTI(m> MMi; lnB,bMit ha.GrM W«M«ii.ia4 Hmw^ MaM iM«*inlMlt4M iMmttliMM fail 
SI (WiririagM KtmO. Hril ■ A*rt Mv* INa DM Tnw. 

For more information, call 

Petersburg Visitor Center 
(804) 733-2400 or (800) 368-3595 



6 Gui(fe WflBnesday, July 1, 1992 



PETERSBUR G, VA . 




1. Visitors Center 

2. Farmers Bank 

3. Siege Museum 

4. Trapffiium l4ouse 

5. Centre HW Manaon 

6. Old Towne 

7. Court House 

8. St. PauTs Church 

9. Petersburg Public Libraty 
10. Poplar Lawn Park 

■ 11 . Southskie RegkNiai 
Medical Center 

12. Blandford Church 

13. Petersburg Natnnal 
BattlefiekJ 

14. Fort Lee (Main Gate) 

15. Quartermaster Museum 

16. Violet Bank Mi'teum 

17. VA State University 

18. Rk:hard Bland College 

19. U.S.S.S.A. Softball 
Hall of Fame 

20. Battersea 



The Petersburg Monitor 

"Taking A Stand For 
Petersburg" To Subscribe 

Call 733-8636 



^fefe/ 



It^^tcnJ 



WORLDVVIDC 
LODGING 



(804)733-1776 



New in 92* 

Best Western 

PETERSBURG 

1-95 AND EXIT 52 

405 WASHINGTON STREET 

PETERSBURG. VA. 23803 

1-800-528-1234 



PETERSBURG, VIRGINIA 

Business Opportunities... Homes... 
Schools. . . Quality of Life. . . 

Ready-to-go locations for shops, 
offices, nianufaciurinji, and warehousing. 

For more infonnation about 
the City of Petersburg, please contact: 

Jack Davenport, Director of Economic Development 

City Hall, Room 208 

Petersburg, Virginia 23803 

(804) 733-2352 



Guide. Wednesday. July 1. 1992 7 



Museums & attractions 


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SV 



Th^ French S0§g Rz:sfaumDt 

WATCH FOR GRAND OPENING IN JULY 

Elegantly Redecorated 

Unique Regional American Cuisine 

Outstanding Service - Moderate Prices 

Open For Lunch and Dinner 

Free Valet Parking For Dinner! 

Available for Banquets y Catered Events y Meetings 

20 W. Old Street in 
Historic Old Towne Petersburg 



cS®. 



c#<e) 



8 Guidtt WeaBcaday, Jidy U 1992 



Appomattox L»n Works brings history to life 



In a dty filled with adcadioas 
^fflming more lliaii tliree ora- 
tories, inchidnig aiNiiMknit Civil 
War historic sites, Petefsbufg is 
oeldKating an inhistiy dut may 
have been diis city's saving 
gnoe. 

Sanoandcd by i m p M ia n t bat- 
defields, el^ant afdHtectue, and 
abundant shopping opportuni- 
ties, including some of the finest 
antique shopping on the East 
Coast, the newly restored 
Appomattox Iron Works 
Industrial Heritage Paifc brings 
back memories of post-Civil 
War Petersburg in die i^ of re- 
constroctioa. This unique col- 
lection of hisKMic buil^ngs and 



over 100 pieces of antique ma- 
dunety in CMd Towne Petersburg 
has been driiwing rave reviews 
from the media and a steady 
stream of tourists. 

Before the Civil War, 
FElcfsbuig had been an industriid 
and trade centra' for the soudieni 
states - wealthy, proq)erous and 
ideally positioned for commer- 
cial activity. In fact the city 
grew to become the seventh 
largest in the South. 

Thra came in the Civil War. 
Because of its importance as the 
a transportation center for the 
Confederacy, Petersburg played a 
pivotal part in determining the 
outcmne of the war. The 10- 



Petersburg Holds Opportunity 



BY JACK DAVENPORT 
Economic OaMtopmant Dinclor 

In addition to offering 
interesting attractions for 
tourists, Petersburg abo offers 
numy opportunities for busi- 
nesses that want to move to the 
City and entrepreneurs thinking 
of starlii^ a new venture. 

In die past two years, mote 
dian 20 businesses have moved 
to or been started in Pctersbug. 
Almost half of diese are small, 
family-owned manufacturing, 
assembly and distribution busi- 
nesses diat have rekxaled fiom 
stales in die noftheasieni area of 
Ibe United States. These firms 
have discovered that by movi^ 
to Pietersburg, diey often can 
tower dieir overaO cost erf opera- 
tions by 25-40 percent. Not 
only is die cost ot leasing or 
bujing real estate lower, bitt die 
cost of labor, electrid^. heat- 
ing, cooling and many other Cac- 
lors is also much lows'. 

Besides being an attractive to- 
cation for manufacturing busi- 



nesses, Petersburg also has 
many opportunities for retailing, 
aoli^ies, crafts, automobile so-- 
vice, restaurants and odier simi- 
lar businesses. The recent 
growth in city tourism means 
diat eotrqireneurs can develop 
businesses diat serve both local 
residents attd visitors. The city's 
Economic Development 
DepartmeiK has b^un collecting 
information from communities 
such as Gettysburg, Penn., 
Chaileston, S.C. and Savannah, 
Ga. to identify the kinds of 
businesses in diose communities 
that could also be started in 
Rdcrsbotg. 

If you own a business and 
wonU like information tboat 
moving your company to 
Betersburg or if you are mter- 
ested in starting a business in 
Pietersbotg, jriease CMitact die 
Department of Economic 
Development at (804) 733-2352 

for a c(Mimiunity information 
padk^ge. 



Beauiful Mornings 
Begin At 8... 

Free Continental Break- 
fast • Remote conrol 
cat)le TV wUh HBO and 
ESPN •Fmekxal cats* 
Non-smokingmoms»24- 
hourdesk'Meethgroom 
•R^taumnts neartfy • 
Guest laundry •FAX 
mactihe ^^ 

PMersburg Super 8 Molel 

556 Wythe Street East • Petersburg. VA 23803 
(804) 861-0793 or ca/rl -800-800-8000 




month-long siege of Petersburg 
devastated the town, closing off 
vital rail lines and sU'angling 
commercial and industrial activ- 
ity. After the war, Petersburg, 
along with die rest of die Soudi, 
£Ked die rigorous ta^ of recon- 
stiuction. One of die few bright 
spots was die Aiqiomattox Iron 
Works, whidi emerged as an in- 
dustrial force leading die Soudi 
from its agricultural past to a 
mechanized future. The Iron 
Works built and repaired every- 
thing from peanut harvesters to 
boot^crapers, and from lamp- 
posts to steam engines. It pros- 
pered, as did much of die rest of 
the country at the turn of the 
century and Pelersburg's recovery 
contmued into die 20di century. 
Eventually, however, as tech- 
notogy raced ahead, die 19di cen- 
tiiry machinery lost ground to 
modon industrial giants to mod- 
em industrial giants and the Iron 
worics finally closed in 1972, 
one hundred years afto* it began. 
The facility was saved from de- 
molition by the Historic 
I^tersburg Foundation, which 
recognized its historic impor- 
tance as the only intact iron 
woriring facility of its kind in 
the country. 

Appomattox Iron Works has 
now been restored as a one acre 
living history museum of indus- 
trial techn(dogy. The very ma- 
chines diat once tooled and built 
an era, now hum and whir for 
visitors in the same buildings 
where skiOed craftsman tepotted 
for work 100 years ago. 

Knowledgeable tour guides 



take visitors through each of the 
shqis and explain the crafts and 
processes that i»opelled die in- 
dustrial revolution and forever 
changed the economic and social 
structure of America: pattern- 
making, molding, casting, 
blacksmidiing, woodworking, 
and machining. Topping off die 
exhibits are two that are particu- 
larly unusual - an array of re- 
stt»ed steam engines and a ohu- 
plete sawmill that was actually 
manufactured by the 
Appomattox Iron Woiks. The 
guided tour takes about 1 1/2 
hours. 

The Iron Worics is located in 
Old Towne and is surrounded by 



delightful antique shops, bou- 
tiques, and federal-period build- 
ings. The Iron Woiks amqriex 
includes a "Company Store' of- 
fering iron kitchen ware, home 
accessories, old fashioned toys, 
games, and model building kits 
for children, rare books, garden 

furniture, and items actually 
made by Iron Worics black- 
smiths. Just up; the street is the 
Mcllwaine House, built in 1815 
and now used as die Petersburg 
Visitors Center, and the the 
Fanners Bank, die second oMest 
bank building in the country. 
The bank still has the original 
teller booths and a secret hide- 
away for the vault 



(yLtnerican Inn 

*** dFormeT^ Tudor Inn) 

Welcome 

To Historic Peterburg 

We Are Here to Serve 

Your Vacation Needs 

• Pool 

• Conference Ftoom 

• Singles, Doubles and ERicienctes 

• Refrigerator In Every Room 

•Cable TV, HBO 

• Direct DisJ Phone 

• Ljuxuiy Rooms at Budget Rates 

• Mlitaiy, Commercial & Senior Discount 

• Tnjckers Rates 

• Guest Laundromat 

• Microwave Avaiale 

* Efficiencies 
,«», • Exercise Room 

KJ^rmrlcan Inn 

2209 County (Mm (iifiuU4€0) 
TtUrs6uts,Vagmia 23803 

(804)733-2800 

iHettr94aiiau Qau, ft. Lu 



Summer Sizzler Weekend Package 



Comfort 
Inn 



WEST 

• Free Continental Breakfast 

• Satellite TV 

• ESPN. Showtime 

• Free Local Phone Calls 

• Outdoor Pool • Basketball • Volleyball 

• Putting Green • Picnic Tables • Grills 



12002 S. Crater Road 
(Exit 45, 1-95 @ Rt. 301) 



(804) 732-2000 
1-800-221-2222 



Guide. Wednesday. July 1. 1992 9 




United States Slo-Pitch SoftbaH Association represents 100,000 teams. 



U.S.S.S.R. Represents Approximately 100,000 Teams 



ByG.W.POINDEXTER 

The United States Slo-pitch Softball 
Association represents about 100,000 
teams. 

That's 2 million players if all the teams' 
rosters are full, said Al Ramsey, the 
association's executive director. 

"Softball is growing every year," 
Ramsey said. 

However, most Softball teams are not 
members of the association or any other, 
Ramsey said. What a team gains by 
joining are qualified officiating and the 
option to compete in association- 
sanctioned tournaments. 

The association provides umpires for 
all its games: there are 15,000 member 
umps across the country, he said. 

But the main attraction to the 
association is tournaments. More than 
200 are sanctioned by the association in 
Virginia alone, many of them in 
Petersburg. 

Thet non-profit association offers 
teagues and tournaments for just about 
everybody: Policemen, servicemen, 
industrial woAcrs, Hispanics and blacks 
all have ^cial tournaments. 

Men and women also have tournaments 
in single-sex and coed divisions. Men 
and women play in several different 
levels in single-sex leagues. 

The association has been in Petersburg 
for 22 years and in its present building on 



"Softball i» growing every year. 

AL Kamaty. V.a.a.aM 



South Crater Road for eight, Ramsey 

said. 

"There are no plans for the 
headquarters to move out of here," 
Ramsey said. 

The headquarters houses 10 employees 
and the association's newspaper and hall 
of fame. 

Many major tournaments are held in 
Pteteisbuif and environs, and have a great 
positive economic impact. 

Harry L. Marsh, the association's 
communications director, uses some 
pretty imjaessive figures to estimate the 
effect a tourmunoit has (Ml die city. 

In a SO-team, four-day tournament. 
Marsh says 1,250 people come to the 
city. Those peqile spend an average of 
$75 a day, for a outright economic impact 
of $375,000. 



But the business brought here -also 
generates other money for the city's 
economy. Marsh estimates actual 
economic impact of tourist dollars at 3.5 
times their actual value. Workers earn 
money working in establishments used 
by the players and fans, and that money. 



too, comes into the city's economy, so a 
tournament actually brings in $1.3 
million. 

Ramsey said the biggest problem facing 
Softball today is liability insurance costs. 

The insurance covers the association if 
people are injured at sanctioned events. 

"Twenty-five years ago, we didn't have 
any insurance," he said. "Last year we 
paid $200,000 for insurance, and this 
year it's jumped to $580,000. 

"That's killing recreation programs all 
over the country, not just softball," he 
said. 

The association's headquarters also is 
home to its Hall of Fame and museum. 

The hall holds 148 jerseys, one from 
each team that's won a world or national 
championship, said Brenda Hamilton, the 
museum's manager. 

Large portraits of hall members line the 
walls. Hall of famers can be ncxninated as 
players, umpires, team managers or 
directors. 

Attendance last year at Ae museum was 
about 6,000, she said. 

However, monthly attendance figures 
have increased 300 percent since 
September, she said. 

The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. weekdays. On Saturdays is opens at 
1 1 a.m., and on' Sundays it opens at 1 
p.m. 

Adults pay $1.50 admission, students, 
senior citizens and groups pay $1. 
Children under 12 are aAnitted free. 



!• Guid^ Wednesday, July 1, 1992 



PETERSBURG 



A^p«uSmjS 



KUC 



• 



Historic Downtown 
• Sports Bar • Deli 
• Mini Mart 

• Ft. Lee 2 miles 

• Virginia State 
University 

Showtime/Cable TV 

• Outdoor Pool 

• Exercise Room 



1-95 & Washington St (from 
South Exit 50, from North 

Exit 52) to Wythe St. 
Petersburg, Virginia 23803 




00 

1T04 
PERSONS 



(804) 733-0730 



Petersburg, VA 




Guide. Wedneaday. July 1, 1992 11 



French Betsy Returns 

Appomattox Tavern and French Betsy To Open In July 



The grand lady of Old Towne re- 
turns in style in July when the French 
Betsy reopens. 

The elegant restaurant brings a touch 
of class back to the historic area with a 
top-of-the-line, reasonably priced 
menu fOr lunch and dinner. 

The menu features American and 
regional foods, such as baked and 
grilled Madeira ham and Virginia crab 
soup. ' 

The Virginia drab soup is our signa- 
ture dish," commented chef Tom Roth. 
He said customers would be able to 
Older samples of the three soups avail- 
able at each meal. 

To keep prices down and provide 
diners with the freshest seafood and 
produce. Roth will change the menu 
every two months. 

"I like being creadve, not preparing 
the same old thing. I try to add flair 
and provide food that will taste good 
and be remembered," he added. 

Roth, who is one of Marriott 
Corporation's top chefs, makes use of 
the thousands of recipes his company 
has found customers love and soudiem 
cookbooks. 

For lunch, customers can select from 
a variety of sandwiches, salads, and 
entrees, priced below $7, according to 
co-owner George Pilarinos. 

The Appomattox Tavern, adjacent to 
the restaurant, provides a casual, re- 
laxed atmosphere for meeting friends 
and business associates. 

Pilarinos said special hors d'oevres 
and {^petizers and happy hour specials 
will also be available in the 
Appomattox Tavern, adjacent to the 
restaurant. 

"There's been no place in this area to 
sit down and have a drink or relax 
after work," said co-owner Marvin 
Broyhill. 

TM bar and restaurant were popular 
attractions in the 1980s wheii Frank 
Peckinbaugh brought life back to the 
former Appomattox Iron Works com- 
plex on Old Street. 

Peckinbaugh started with an antique 
business in what was the steam engine 
repair shop. He began selling soft 
drinks and cookies from the shop. 



iKENCHBHSy 



TT 



The French Betsy is an American regional fare 

restaurant at 20 Old Street in historic Old Towne. 

Prices range from $3.95 to $7 for lunch and $13 to 

$15 for dinner. 

Banquet facilities are available. 

Open Tuesday through Saturday from 1 1 a.m. to 9 

p.m., and Sundays from 1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Telephone: 732-8888 



Business eventually grew into a full 
fledged restaurant. 

He named the restaurant after his 
wife, Betsy, and a woman who once 
had a restaurant in the same spot in the 
1800s. Old records indicated the estab- 
•Ushment was run by a "French Betsy," 
according to Pilarinos. 

Pilarinos and Broyhill have kept the 
industrial theme through the decor. A 
steam engine is parked near the front 
door of the restaurant. 

Further inside, guests will find 
renmants of the mechanism that trans- 



ported the steam engines. 

Pictures from the Appomattox Iron 
Works, which operated for more than 
100 years, line the walls of the restau- 
rant. The hon Works, with its original 
buildins and machinery, is now a one- 
acre industrial heritage museum. 

Earlier this year, Pilarinos and 
Broyhill signed an agreement with 
Marriott Corporation, which has a 
reputation for fine dining, to manage 
the restaurant for their museum visi- 
tors and the general public. 

"We wanted to provide a great place 
for visitors and residents of the tri-ci- 
ties area to eat. We also wanted to of- 
fer a place for clubs and odier organi- 
/ zations to meet," Pilarinos said. 

The restaurant can seat up to 150 and 
has a special dining room available for 
private parties. 




George Pilarinos, co-owner of the Appomattox Tavern and the Frendh Betsy 
stands by a steam engine inside the French Betsy. 



12 Guide. Wednesday, July 1, 1992 





See t^ ^Kdua^McU^ ^w^lutioH Mme tO' U^c 




APPOMATTOX IRON WORKS 

Industrial Heritage Paik 
iX • Guided tours of fiiUy restored 19tn century 
iron works. One acre of historic industrial 
shops & Federal period buildings. Listed on 
National Register of Histcxic Places. 

• Outstanding collection of restored antique 
woodworicing & metalworking machine 
tools demonstrated for visitors. 

• Exhibits of antique farm machinery, steam 
engines & sawmill. 

• Open daily 10 am to 5 pm. 
Historic Old Towne 

Petersburg, VA 

(800) 232-IRON 




TMmilM^^^ 



iJ^^S.I _ I 'J^^'k 



APP0fc|ffTOXIRONWQ^ 




FQUNDERS AND MACHINISTS. 




NOW YOU CAN OWN THE FARM 




Farm Country Sets by ERTL 

• ham and Silo • Farm House • Hog Lot and more 



Appomattox Cast Metal Toys 

One of the areas largest selections of 
metal toys. 





Cast Metal Tractors 

A wonderful variety for collectors or 
gift buyers. 



*CASTAND WROUGHT IRON PRODUCTS •TOYS* BOOKS DEAUNG WITH OLD TECHNOLOGY A HISTORY •INTERESTING GIFTS 



APPOMATTOX IRON WORKS COMPANY STORE 



24 OLD STRKKT, PKTLRSBl R(;. VA. 



733-7404 



The Virginia r 





Wednesday. July 8, 1992 



SERVING THE CITY OF VIRGINI, 



65in Yeoi No 28 25 Cents 



Embattled police chief fires back at the Pilot; 
calls attack "personal;" will stand on record 

City Council, city manager reject 
Beacon's call for Chief Wall to quit 



By M.J. RICHARDS 
Virginia Beach Sun Staff WHier 

The resignation of Virginia Beach 
Police Chief Charles WaU has been 
called fw by The Virginia Beach 
Beacon, a tid}toid insert to The Vir- 
ginian-Piiol and The Ledger-Star, 
the Norfolk-based daily newspaper. 

City Manager James Spore and 
Virginia Beach City Council mem- 
bers, however, say there is no rea- 
son for Wall to resign. 

Wall, who has been police chief 
for \0i years and in law enforce- 
ment for 34 years, said he plans to 
Tight back by standing on his record 
with the police department 

After publishing several recent 
articles about alleged promotion- 
fixing, tow morale and general dis- 
contentment within the <tepartment, 
the Beacon printed an ecUtorial in 
the Wednesday, July 1 issue on 
page 6, written by columnist and 
assistant editorial page editor Jerry 
Alley, calling for Wall to step 
down. 

"But Virginia Beach is, in more 
ways than one, beginning to re- 
semble a little Los Angeles. And 
one of the problems that the two 
cities share is a police chief who 
failed to wok out," Alley's column 



"In L.A., Chief Gates finally left, 
and the people of that city are better 
off as a result. The suggestion from 
this comer is that Wall do the 
same." 

The columnist went cxi to request 
City Manager James Spore, who is 
Wall's boss, take action. 

"The ball rests in two courts 
now. The chief could resign and 
walk quietly into retirement. Or, 
the city manager could fire him," 
Alley wrwc. 

But \iWl 4iaa(raM wiiit AUey's 
suggestion, and said he Hm no in- 
tention of stepping down, only of 
fighting back. 

"This is what I do and this my 
life," said Wall. "I've been a po- 
liceman for 34 years, and r;ve been 
a chief for 25 yean, so this is what 
I do. All I have is a reputation . . . 
The only way I ever intend to fight 
back is by doing a good job." 

Vice-Mayor William Sessoms 
said that the police department is 
doing "a superb job," and sees no 
basis for W^l's resignation. 

"I start having sympathy for the 
chief when the newspaper has gone 
after him," said Sessoms. "I don't 
want the newspaper to run the city 
of Virginia Beach; I want the city 
manager to run the city of Virginia 
Beach." 

But Wall said he was warned 
more than a year ago that the Not- 
folk -based newspaper would seek 
his demise. 

"I just (km't understand. It seems 
I've been singled out by them and it 
has to be something personal." said 
Wall. "As I've said, I heard it 
through the grapevine quite awhile 
ago, that they were gonna get my 
job." 

From April 4. 1991 
throii^ July 25. 1991 

the Pilot and Beacon published 49 
articles as part of its "polk;e brutal- 
ity" series in Virginia Be^h. In ad- 
dition, 14 editorials and columns 
were printed, with 69 letters to the 
editor. 

Were present City Council 
members aware before the series 
began, or was it true, that police 
brutality was out of control in Vir- 
ginia Beach? 

"I d(»i't think so," said Council- 
man Robert Clybum. "I think they 
took a few isolated incidents and 
tried to make an article oitt of iu" 

Councilmembers Robert Dean 
and Nancy Parker noted that the city 
was cleared of all char^ in an in- 
vestigatKMi. 

After die police bniiality series, a 
list of 22 inaccuracies and 32 ex- 
amples of "bias or irresponsible, 
reporting by The Virginian-Pilot" 
was compiled by the police depart- 
ment and brought to the Pilot's at- 
tention. 

"I don't think they reported the 
facu," »kl Wall. "Id iact, we gave 
them 54 specifics diat we look to 
their public editor - either mis- 
statements, quotes, out and out 
mistakes and we receivnl no - well, 
we got an acknowledgement saying 
it was a i»t4>iem in perception." 
said Wall. He added thM he wrote a 
letter to the editor, of which most 



was published, but one part was 
edited out 

Wall said that some people sued 
the city based on newspaper arti- 
cles. 

"We've never been found guilty 
of any violation of the law, though 
some of the cases were settled, but 
in the courts, we've always pre- 
vailed." said Wall. 

Since the series, negative public- 
ity aimed at the police department 
continued. 

In March, April, May and June, 
^ the Pilot and the Beacon published 
18 articles regarding Wall's author- 
ity in die police department Topics 
ranged from allegations that selected 
officers received help in jneparing 
for the sergeant's exam, to 
"turmoil" and low morale among 
officers, according to surveys, re- 
duction in DUI arrests and tickets, 
among others. 

"I can't honestly say that the 
newspaper's giving a fair shake to 
the police department," said Ses- 
soms. "In fact, it's the exact qipo- 
site." 

Wall said that while there are 
some problems in the department, 
he is taking the police officers' 
concerns seriously and is making 
efforts toward improvement. The 
question of some officers receiving 
help on the sergeant's exam, he 
said, has been addressed. 

"It (help) wasn't offered to any," 
he said. "It was requested by some. 
Some people requested it. It wasn't 
like the sergeant announced I'm 
willing to do this and who wants to 
do this. I want you and you com- 
ing, but not you. Some people ap- 
proached these (personnel) to ask 
them for some help, and they pro- 
vided diem (with it). There is a dif- 
ference. No one was JUpi»L down. 
That's all I can say." WaJl also said 
that the assistance was given after 
working hours and off city prop- 
erty. 

Spore said diat the sergeant in 
quesdon was transferred, and Wall 
said he thinks diis will help allevi- 
ate any question of unfairness ia the 
future. The results of die original 
exam were nullified, and candidates 
wereretested. 



Uierc might be some people doggin' 
it. I've got over 800 people diat 
work for me. and diere are some." 

Wall said Uiat die department is 
27 people short, or 5 percwit below 



department, and 44 responded to it. 
The published results, according to 
die July 5 article on page 4 of die 
Beacon, stated diat "these front-line 
supervisors say diey have lost faidi 



Police cite problems with series 



From April 4, 1991 Uirough 
July 25. 1991 The VirginianPi- 
loi and The Virginia Beach Bea- 
con published 49 articles related 
to its "police brutality" series in 
Virginia Beach. In addition, 14 
editorials and columns were 
printed, widi 69 letters to the 
editor in response. 

After the police brutality se- 
ries, a list of 22 inaccuracies and 
32 examples of "bias or 
irresponsible reporting by The 
Virginian-Pilot" was compiled by 
the police depariment and txought 
to the Pilot's attention. 

"I don't diink diey reported die 
facts. In fact, we gave diem 54 
specifics diat we took to their 
public editor - either misstate- 
ments, quotes, out and out mis- 
takes and we receive no - well, 
we got an acknowledgement say- 



POUCE 
RUTALITY 



at the 



Hth'nvlk, tuptutj; »~,lli a .\iHMiX. lu'/ii/r^' luuitf limnk 

fnnu a imr. itiii in ilutn unkr f/io muilil /«■ in u fioitcc 

^ hn'kiip. Ik'uh-n ami f/|rt/j,vJ i* illi nuiic ,!t'70f<-t KittiH\\ 

hi (/j/t-n«*n.i uwr tlw jhi.U fiNir iHiniih.\, 

25 fiiti'Jc nvftunirtl liui\nniiii:c n'iii>i.\ niih 1 'n^uini 

liciicii iiffncn eu'ohud mfa viokni O'lifroHUilUuiK 



ing it was a problem in percep- 
tion," said Virginia Beach Chief 
Charles Wall. 

Wall also wrote a letter to the 
editor, of which most was pub- 
lished, but one part was edited 
out. 



PERSONAL OR PROFESSIONAL? 



"It seems I've been singled out by them and it has to be something 
personal ... I heard It through the grapevine quite awhile ago, that 
they were gonna get my job," Police Chief Charles Wall told The 
Virginia Beach Sun. . 

Some council members also say that 77?© Viiginian-Pilot's attack 
could be more personal than professional. 

"I start having sympathy for the chief when the newspaper has 
gone after him," said Vice Mayor William Sessoms. 

Wall declined to elaborate on what he meant by t)ersonal," but 
Virginia Beach court records show that on March 2, 1990 a teenage 
son of a well known Wrg/n/an-P/tof editor was arrested and charged 
with drunk driving. He was convicted about four months later of the 
charge. The police bmtality series tiegan in the newspaper nine 
months later. r • 



In this latest series of 

articles, the effectiveness of die 
police department, through statis- 
tics in die number of arrests and 
tickets, was also addressed by the 
Norfolk-based newspaper. Wall said 
diat while diere is a decline in some 
areas, one needs to look at the 
overall picture. 

'Tickets have gone down. Arrests 
have gone down. Calls for service 
have gone up. Our closure rate has 
gone up," said Wall. "We've got 
more crime and we're clearing more 
of it. Part of what the problem is, 
is the guys are gun-shy a litUe bit. 
You know, hey, I take this action 
and 1 stand up in court. So there is 
some gun-shy. They're concerned 
about bad publicity. 

"But 1 have not seen any type of 
slowdown. On an individual basis. 



strengdi. When die department is 
fully staffed, he said he is still short 
on personnel. 

"There are fewer tickets and fewer 
arrests being made, because fewer 
people are out there doing more," 
said Wall. "So that means they 
spend more time running from call 
to call than they used to, so diere's 
less time to get involved. We're 
probably closing 7 to 8 percent 
more calls for the first five months 
of this year than we did last year." 

He added that his drunk driving 
arrests are increasing, and Uiat while 
they are still low, the number of 
fatal accidents and injury accidents 
caused by drunk drivers are also 
down. 

The Norfolk newspaper specifi- 
cally stated in its Saturday, March 
21 article on reduced ticket writing 
and arrests, that the reason is "low 
morale among officers." 

More recendy, two articles on die 
results of a survey conducted by die 
Sergeant's Association were pub- 
lished in the Beacon, entitled 
"Survey: Beach Sergeants Fed Up 
Widi Police Chief," and "Anodier 
Survey Confirms Low Police 
Morale." The survey was reportedly 
distributed to 61 sergeants in die 



in the chiefs ability to lead." 

"You'll never get 100 percent of 
die people all die time agreeing diat 
diey like their boss," said Dean. 
Dean explained diat there may be a 
certain faction on the police de- 
partment diat does not like him. 

"I'll bet you could give diat same 
poll to any doctors and dentists and 
get the same results," Clybum said. 

Parker said diat she scanned die 
survey, and diinks that "surveys are 
good at diat particular time," but 
follow up improvements need to be 
made. She said die poll should be 
used as a tool. 

"I diink surveys can be used as an 
indicator," Parker said. "Usually 
surveys create other questions that 
need to be addressed and asked." 

Spore said diat he has asked Wall 
to compare last year's survey widi 
diis year's and prepare a report 

"He's trying to be as receptive 
and responsive to diis as possible," 
said Spore. "Some are legitimate 
issues, some are not. With a de- 
partment diis size, there are going 
to be some problems." 

Wall said that since 

the survey articles and die call 
for his resignation were published. 




ViTfinia Btack Sim U^ fkou 

t 

The 1992 4th of July weekend was "successful," according to Ron Kuhlman, Virginia 
Beach Convention and Visitor Department. "Hotels and restaurants reported brisk busi- 
ness throughout the weekend," Kuhlman said. This part three-day holiday weekend 
brought with It, for the most part, clear skies, hot weather and plenty of visitors to the 
resort area of the city. Annually, Kuhlman, Virginia Beach hosts 2.5 millton visitors. 
Labor Day this year falls on Monday, Sept. 7. 



he has received many calls from 
people. 

But what do diey say to the 
chief? 

"Don't let die newspaper get you, 
hang in there," said Wall. "You 
have a good police department See, 
I'm willing to be judged by my 
people on the sti«et. Survey or no 
survey. I'll tell you, I'm really con- 
cerned about that survey. It bodiers 
me bodi personally and profession- 
ally." 

Wall said, however, diat he has 
no intentions of leaving, yet. 

"I've never missed a day's work of 
my life," said Wall. "I've worked 
every day of my life, and if I didn't 
have diis job, I'd do something 
else. This is the place I want to 
live. I like diis police departinent. I 
like this city. I've raised my family 
here. I'd like to finish my career 
here. I'd like to finish it out a litde 
later. I don't want to finish it now." 

Prior to the City Council meet- 
ing diis past Tuesday, some council 
members said they had no inten- 
tions of bringing a motion for 
Spore to seek an investigation or 
call for Wall's resignation. 

"I diink die city manager is aware 
of the situation, and he has been 
here long enough." said Clybum. 
"And if he came to us with a fair 
understanding of the situation and 
wanted to make a change, I would 
say, 'you're the man, and that's 
(your decision).' But I don't see any 
need to make diat decision right 
now." 

Dean said that he diinks all die 
facts need to be brought out. 

"We're talking about a man's life 
and career. Not only his service in 
Virginia Beach, but before diat," 
Dean said. He said he had no plans 
to make any motion at die meeting, 
but if one came up he would 
"require die city manager to do his 
job." 




Chief Charles Wall 



Sessoms also said the had no 
plans to make any such motion, 
and docs not think there is an im- 
mediate need for Wall to resign. 

Councilwoman Nancy Parker 
agreed, saying she would like to 
wait and see how the city manager 
deals widi die situation. 

Wall said that until any matters 
are resolved, he prefers to stand on 
his 10-year record widi die police 
department, and plans to take the 
advice of Abraham Lincoln. 

A wall hanging behind his desk 
was given to him as a gift by an 
officer. Wall said that he plans to 
follow Lincoln's advice: 

"If I were to read, much less an- 
swer all of the attacks made on me, 
this shop might as well be closed 
for any other business. I'll do the 
very best I know, the very best I 
can, and I mean to keep doing so 
until the end. If the end brings me 
out alright, what is said against me 
won't amount to anything. If the 
end brings me out wrong, 10 angels 
swearing I'm right would make no 
difference." 

Mayor Mcyera Obemdorf and 
councilmen|bers John A. Baum, 
Linwood O. Branch, III, James W. 
Brazier, Jr., Louis R. Jones, Paul J. 
Lanteigne and John D. Moss could 
not be reached for comment. 



Virginian-Pilot in new feeding frenzy - page 2 





Vtoe Mayor Sessoms 



Mayor Oberndorf 



Water talks continue 
at swearing-in ceremony 



By LEE CAHILL 
Virginia Beach Sun City Coimcil Reporter 

All Moses had to do was get wa- 
ter out of a rock - and he had some 
powerful help. 

Virginia Beach, on the other 
hand, has been facing hurdles for 10 
years set up by die state of North 
Carolina aiid southside Virginia 
communities in its efforts to slake 
die thirst of its people. 

Rabbi Israel Bomsiein, of the 
B'nai Israel Congregation, giving 
an invocation diat proved to be die 
highlight of the organizational 
meeting of die Virginia Beach City 
Council on July 1. couldn't resist 
the comparison of the Israelites' 
search for water in biblical times to 
die Virginia Beach dilemma. 

Desalination? Well, diere was die 
time when die Israelites had been 
three days without water and, when 
they finally found die water of die 
Marah, it was too bitter. On die 
advice of the Lord. M<»es threw a 
tree - a certain tree - into die water 
to sweeten it. Was it a convert ref- 
erence to desalination? a^ed Bom- 
stein. 

Bomstein continued with the 
story about water gushing out of a 
rock after Moses hit it with his rod, 

also at dw bidding of the Lord. 

Bomsiein got to die modem-day 
search for water from L^e Gaston 
widi a prayo^ for die city's success. 

Mayor Meyera Obcnidorf, newly 
sworn in for her second term as 



mayor, also placed water at the top 
of her list of diree goals for die 
city. The others are economic de- 
velooment and a secure and strong 
eduv itional system. 

"Rabbi Bomstein's prayer for 
water from Lake Gaston." she said, 
is one many will say 'amen' to." 

The main business of the meet- 
ing was die election of the vice 
mayor. The tact that William D. 
Sessoms Jr. would get die post was 
a foregone conclusion, so much so 
that his nameplatc had already been 
placed at the seat on the left of the 
mayor, die traditional seating for 
the vice mayor. 

However a minority of council 
(the vote to elect Sessoms to die 
second term aftor a defeat two vears 
post was 7-4) made itself heard by 
voting for new councilmember 
Robert Dean, representing the 
Kempsville Borough. Incoming At- 
Large councilmember John D. 
Moss, returning to council for a 
ago, nominated Dean who also got 
votes from the mayor and coun- 
cilmembere Nancy Parker, Dean and 
Moss. 

The Honorable J. Kenneth 
Whilchurst, chief judge of die Vir- 
ginia Beach Circuit Court, swore in 
die mayor, the vice mayor and the 
incoming council members - vet- 
eran Blackwater councilmember 
John A. Baum, Moss, Dean and 
Linwood Branch from the Beach 

D Sm WATER. ^|«7 



2 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 8. 1992 



Editorials 



Pilot's feeding frenzy 

Once again. The Virginian-Pilot is in a feeding frenzy. And 
this time, some of their reporters and editors smell Virginia 
Beach Police Oiief Charies Wall's blood. 

The Virginian-Pilot's tabloid insert, the Beacon, has called 
for the chiefs resignation. Oh my, what a surprise. They've 
been setting the chief up fca- the kill since the controversial 
Greekfest several years ago. Then, the Norfolk-based 
newspaper tried as haid as it could to prove police brutaliQr at 
the Beach. Now it's low nrorale at the police department Is the 
thinking here that arrest rates may be down because the police 
force isn't happy? They have low morale? Too bad. Morale or 
no morale, Mayor Obemdorf is right when she says she wants 
the department to always function at 100 percent. Problems, 
real or perceived, need to be worked on and in the nwantime, 
everyone necMls to take care of business. 

The Virginian-Pilot has a long track record of attacking public 
officials to the point that they are eventually removed from 
office - either voluntarily or by force. 

Wall's future in this city is tiie decision of Gty Council and 
City Manager James Spore. Don't let a few reporters and 
editors, in pursuit of career enhancement, unfairly tear the city, 
and the region apart any more than it already has. — O.D.G. 




Thinking of creative ideas for children to do in the 
summertime can keep them from being bored 



Journalistic ethics 

The Beacon, an insert to The Virginian-Pilot and The Ledger- 
Star, has called for Uie resignation of Virginia Beach Police 
Chief Charles Wall. ; 

Wall's boss, Qty Manager Jwnes Spore, however, has not. 

One Virginia Beach Gty G)uncil member firmly stated that 
tiic newspaper does not run the city, the city manager does. 

The point that the Norfolk-based newspaper has attacked 
Wall has been addressed by several city officials. 

Wall himself stated tiiat he was told through the grapevine 
that the newspaper was seeking his demise for po^onal rea- 
sons. 

Where does the freedom of the press end? Does it end when a 
question of etiiics and motive beccxne involved? 

A newspaper's job is to print the objective news. When per- 
sonal feelings are involved, it would seem this mission be- 
comes clouded. 

The qiKsticm is, does a newspaper editor or reporter have tiie 
right to use tiie media as a means of attacking a person's repu- 
tation without showing a clear picture and presenting all of the 
facts equally and objectively in an unbiased manner? 

At Uiis point, it becomes the reader's job to sort through tiie 
"evidence," as reported and published by tiie newspaper. 

Without all of tiie facts, it may be (ufficult for a reader to 
make a fair jiulgement. 

What, tiien, is tiie solution? Can tiie public demand a fair and 
accurate description of two or more sides to any issue? If it 
does, how can one ever be sure that all of tiie tacts are pre- 
sented? 

It is now left up to tiie city officials and the public to deter- 
mine what tiie facts are and what tiie conclusions should be. — 
M.J.R. 



Another View 



Hill, Washington making money while 
Leona Hemsley is in prison for lying 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. Se$- 
liont, Virginia 
BeacA Sun col- 
umnitL 



In last week's column as it relatec 
to the notorious "TsiVtmok Scandal' 
that took placed Las Vegas in Sep- 
tember, where 26 women com|riained 
that they were victims of sexual ha- 
rassment, I hapt that I left no ques- 
tun as to how I feel about disr^qiect 
and mistreat- 
ment of 
women. 

I do, how- 
eva, have some 
concerns about 
some women's 
disrespect and 
mistreatmentof 
men. While I 
have no illu- 
sions that the 
disrespect on 
the pan of men 
is far greater 
than that of 
women to men, 
it is ncx as one 
sided as Rqve- 
————— seniative Pat 
Schioedo' (the orw that talks through 
her nose) would have us believe. 

Recent devdcqxnents in the cases 
of Anita Hill ami Desiiee Washing- 
ton are t«^ examples that require 
further scrutiny. 

There hi^ nevo^ been any doubt in 
my mind that old Judge Tliomas did 
in fact hit upon Hill, uid at the time of 
the tearing, Hill cmviiKed me that 
die was alim^ a virgin (diat was 
nevM^ really ^rf>Iished). However, I 
gave ha the beo^itof the doubt She 
also convniced me tM the dirty oU 
jud^ (Sd secuaOy hara» her. while 
she did nothing tt>«iooiBi^ it 

I believed her when sheawidiMall 
^ wwted to do was 10 piK the to^- 
rible event behmd her and letuni lo 
her j(4> and ccmtinue a life «it of the 
limeiighL 

After gmning ite symptfhy (tf the 
whofe natkm, ste did jsoL Ae (^>po- 
siiB frrnn what riie ^i ^ ««s ^^g 
to do. It dKt hm uri» h^ voy lo^ to 



hire an agent and go on the speaking 
circuit, demanding thousands of dol- 
lars for qjeaking engagements. 

Old Dominion Univosity recently 
paid her thousands of dollars to speak 
there. She appears on talk shows, in 
writer's columns and is capitalizing 
on the very notoriety she said she did 
tiot want. Hiis is stnuige conduct for 
8 donise college professor who just 
wanted to be left alone to continue 
her quiet life. This Imngs her cred- 
ibility to question. 

Clarence Thcmias was appointed 
to the Suprane Court, but beoiuse of 
Hill. I will always remember Thomas 

as an admirer of Lcmg Dong Silver, 
and die one who found a pubic hair in 
his Coke. Because I now believe diat 
Hill coukl be lying, I don't know 
where the truth is in diiscase. We will 
[»obably nevo'know. 

Then there is the case 
of Washington who sent 

fomKT heavyweight boxing cham- 
pion Mike Tyson to jail for rape. I 
have mvci doubted that IVsm dkl 
npt Washington, he is an obvious 
mcntMi with the brain of a stx-yev- 
old uid the body (rfa num. however, 
as in the case of Hill, Washmgtrai is 
gating a kx of mile^ out of tte 
disgusting e{Nsode, and iK)w, a recent 
ruling by the Rhode Island SiqReme 
Court iMves the possibility that 
Washington may have committed 
perjury, so we really dMi'tknow what 
the truth is in the cases (^ those ti«ra 
ladies, do ««? 

Ok case dmt I sn sure (rf is the 
Leona Honsley confinement She is 
no ttaeat to socKty ««1 does iM have 
many mem yau3 to li^. If ever a 
woman was misirmed. diis is a p»d 
exan^e. Qiminals win have corn- 
mined heinous crimes such as rqie. 
murder, armed nMKxytHc^ut walk- 
ing the areets while poor Lecmi rots 
in jail. To nuJce ha- sdfa table is 
un«Hi$ci(Niable. iMhagP. 

Wekmm to the retf wiyid. 




When I was growing up, I was 
infamous for using those popular 
is u m m e r 
phrases: 
"Mom, I'm 
bored," "Mom. 
diere's nothing 
to do." "What 
can I do now?" 
"Mom . . ." 

The televi- 
sion was off- 
limits during 
those summer 
days so my 
mother would 
patiently give 
me three orfour 
options of 
things I could 
do - finger 
paint, read a 
____^_ book, play 
kickball outside, clean the house 
etc. 

I wouldchooseoneof my modier's 
ideas (usually cleaning die house 
wasn't my Hrst choice) or think of 
something new to do on my own and 



Slice of 
Life 

By Melanie 
Beroth, a New- 
town area resi- 
dent and profits- 
sional typesetter. 



be off with the jnoject Boredom 
nevn- lasted long in our house. 

Now, as an "almost adult" I real- 
ize the effect my mother's psychol- 
ogy had on me. Whenever I have 

The televiiion was 
off-limiti during 
thoae summer daya 
so my mother would 
patiently give me 
three or four op- 
tions of things I 
could do - finger 
paint, read a bookT" 
play kickball out- 
side, clean the 
house, etc. 

time to spare - which is rare - my 
mind goes reeling back to the things 
I did as a child. It's been a tong time 
since I pulled out the finger {»ints, 
but thinking of creative projects is no 



longer hard to (to. 

When I'm alone.Imay takea walk, 
write a fun stc»y (^ read a book I've 
had on my shelf for awhile. I may 
make cookies for a friend or call 
someone I haven't talked to in a long 
time. Whatever I choose, it is some- 
diing that I enjoy doing to relax and 
take some time off. 

The way you grow up 

so ottea affects the way yoa will 
spend die restof your life, buteadcf 
letting children vegetate in front of 
the TV. it may be well wodi it to 
help tii«n tiiink of ways to use their 
creativity and energy. 

If you have trouble thinking of 
ideas on the spot, you and your child 
could make a box up of fun things to 
do during an "I'm bored" phase. 

Then, when your child says tiiey 
don't have uiyUiing to do. they can 
simply pick a piece of paper or two 
from the box and be on Uieir way. 

With so many things to do in die 
world today, no eight, 10 w 22-year- 
old slfouMlqKnd a^gle tfiylieiig 
bored. 



Just A Chat 

with Barbara Simpson 



Name: Barbara Simpson (Bart Simpson's distant 
cousin). 

Nickname: Miss Laflov, Bobby Ann. 

Occupation: Broadcast copywriter/producer/cast- 
ing directcff/pre-planner/ccmiedienne/Bctress/clown. 

Neighborhood: Windsor Woods. 

Hometown: Virginia Beach. 

How long have you lived in Norfolk: 29 years. 

Last city you lived in before moving to Virgiq|a 
Beach: Raleigh. N.C. 

Age: 44 years young. 

Marital status: Never married; waiting for my true 
love whose faults I like best 

ChiMren: None. 

What you love about your Job: Unique, versuile. 
entertaining! 

What you hate about your job: Any ovo'-long 
production hours.or your clown make-up melting down 
your neck on hot days. 

If you dldn 't have your current Job. you would be: 
Laflov television hostess. 

Biggest accomplishment in your life: Widi a skel- 
eton crew, developing the entire CBN film dqiartment 
in the pioneering days. 

Secret to success: Follow your dreams and God's 
will. 

If you could chan^ one aspect of your life to make 
it better, what would it be: No allergies, that just 
recently developed. 

What most people don't know about you is: A 
creative type can get bored easily. 

Best personality trait: My love for pec^le and 
^reading laughter and love wl»nver I go. 

Worst personality trait: Tcndeihcarted. 

Pet peeve: Birds use your car as a badiroom. 

Biggest quirk: Too many to name, but I like them 

If you had your life to live over again, what would 
you do differently: Cut out any aiffoing trials in life 
and learn by an easio- mediod. 

If you won the tottery, what would you do with the 
money: Help my family, |»y off all bills and give 
money to Christian Action Crisis vKtims and other 
worthy causes. 

Fun evening: Romantic fun widi your beloved. 

Fun weekend: Advoituring into one-of-a-kind cir- 
cumstances. 

Dream vacation: Flying date widi Superman. 

Favorite magazfaie: New Wohum. 

I drive a: Laflov mobile Lincoln-Mocury Tracer 
widi my dash pet dK I^und Fun>y. 

Dream car: A la'ge Laflov mcMte van with badi. 

Who do you most admire: My dedkatni nnMher,: 
Audrey Simpson and Rkhsd Ibssle, my Quistian 
Actiwi ^aya ymrkx leacha. 

What do you lfe« to ito to relax after a hard day's 
w(N^: Have a fun, rcmiaitic dtfe widi ^mv betoved. 

Your favorite Amd ami driak: Spaghetti, popcorn 
»idPq)si. 



m^ 



^■S«# 



Food you hate the most: Anchovies. 

Favorite restaurant: La Brocca on Birdneck Road. 

Favorite food to cook: Flaming shishkababs. 

Favorite artkle of clothing: Silly costumes, gowns 
and flattoing outfits. 

Favorite television program:i4/ienMuionandFi(// 
House. 

Favorite movie: Superman. 

Your favorite type of musk: Love songs, contem- 
porary God soigs, rock'n roll. 

Favorite entertainer: Lucille Ball, Gilda Radner. 

The happiest time in your life, so far: Tlie moA 
unique spiritual awakening with God, miracles, healing 
and seeing angels. 

If you were to become famous, what would you 
want to be famous for: My mission in life - spreading 
more love and laughter diat's needed. 

What is the most tan tine you have bad in the past 
week: Singing telegrams as the qxxif DoDy Farloons 
and kx:atic»i scouting fot "Joe's J^" commercials. 

If you couU pick Just two of the foikmiog, which 
vrouid you pick: braim, looks, a good persoaaBty or 
wealth? Brains and a good pnsonality. 

What do you think to one of the b^^cs* probiens 
facing the wim-M: Lack of.Iove and God's ways. 

What do you think to one (^ the bigg^ probkan 
facing Virgtaia Beach: Curraidy, dw new "no cruis- 
ing" law. 

What do you like mo^ about Vfa-ginia Beuk: 
Frioidly peoph, fny favorite frkmds md tenily. 

If you could spend 10 ntautM ah»c wtth the 
President George Bush, what would yon talk 
about?: Supexoititantexp^iseamlwa^.Tonc^cxB' 
debt telp ethKittion. lower taxes, aid violence cam- 
paigns, etc. Ftf^ make our govemmeitt personnel sujp 
using Amerk;an debtors to play "iich and frunons." Sdl 
all limos and use bullet-prorf e«mocws. The chaiffers 
g» drivoi by die top government 10 be him^led, ud the 
newspaptf headlm^ i«k1 "Amoka Sl^mg Up." 



Off The Record 

Confessions of a 
hit-and-run driver 

By M.J. RICHARDS 
ViigiiteBaadiSun SlaffWitsr 

I was minding my own business, 
driving down die highway in die kft 
lane at a cruising altitude of 55 mph, 
when it happened. 

I saw it for just a ^lit-second. I hit 
die.brates and tiled to swave (Mt of 
[die way. but die 
car coming up on 
my right pre- 
vented me from 
luting out of die 
way in time. 
SMACK! 
I thought he 
was coming right 
through die wind- 
shield, but as a I 
lo(^edinmyrear 
view mirror, die 
bird went hur- 




Rlchards 



dliAg duough die air and over die 
shoukier barricade. 

I felt ill. My mind was racing. I had 
never hit a bird before. 

My fiitt diought came to The Vir- 
ginia Beach Sun columnist (and 
reknowned seagull-hater) B J. Ses- 
sions. 

My next diought came to die tons 
of readers diat justa few mondisago, 
wanMd Sessions run out of town be- 
cause he questioned die value of die 
life of a seagull. 

My next bought was' to pull over, 
but there was no shoulder, and at least 
10 cars were already passing me, 
honking dieir horns and waving dieir 
fists. 

By die time I got over to die right 
hoie, I had tiavelled more dian mile. 

I felt iU. What should I do? 

If I stapipeA on die dioulder, it 
would take about IS minutes to walk 
back to die site, and time was no 
shoulderto walkon. There were solid, 
white cement barricades erected on 
bodi sides of die road where con- 
struction was being done. 

I had a meeting widi a top city 
official in a short while, and to keq> 
him. and my editor, waiting, would 
be an ill-fated mistake. 

I. kept going, my hands gripping 
die steering wheel. My taiuckles 
turned white. 

Some might say it was a heardess 
tiling to do and I should be tried fw 
murder, but it was really an innocent 
mistake. If I had walked back to die 
«it|, I«nyght very wdl'hav» been 
killed myself. 

In fact, I am not sure whetiier die 
bird was killed. 

I have seen birds hit by odier cars 
and looked back to see tivnn tidce off 
in flight 

I am not saying what I did was die 
right tiling, because I feel tiiere is no 
right tiling. I value die gift of life, but 
I also had no ccmtrol over die sinu- 
tion. 

I can just see whiu would have 
hiqqmied if I went back. If die bird 
was, in fact still tiiere. what OMild I 
have done for him? If he was dead, I 
couldbuiy itbutif hewasnotclimb- 
ing over die barricade in a dcirt and 
heels, walking back down die mkkile 
of die roadway widi an injured bird in 
my hands, hqiing I would also not be 
hit by oncoming traffic, seems ludi- 
crous. 

Imi^tadddutnooneelsesKq^ 
ddier. 

AllIcansayis,Ihopehe'sOK,and 
flying out there widi die rest of l|is 
feadioed friends. 

If he is not. tiien may he go to bird 
heaven. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

(USPS660-140) 
138 Sontii Rosemont Road 

SuiU209 
Vlrgtaila Beach, Va. 23452 
TelephoM: (804) 486-3436 

Publisher 
Hum Byerly 

Asriatant to die Publisher 

Mu^iag Editor 

Greg Goldfarb 

Staff Writer 
M.J. Richards 

ConpoaitioB 

LorettaLomax 
Melanie Beroth 

The Virginia Beadi Sun is pub- 
lislMd every Wednuday by By«ly 
Publications, Inc.. Franklin, Va. Sec- 
ond Class postage is paid at 
Lymhaven Siatkm. Virginia Beach. 
Va. IHwtmaster Send address changes 
to Hie Vir^nia Bntch Sun. 138 South 
Rraonmt Road, Suiu 209. Virginia, 
Beach. Va. 23452. SulMoii^ion Rues: 
By mail adi^sses within 40 mila of 
Virginia Beach. Va.. one year. $ 14.95, 
two ytm, $24.50. Virgmia and North 
Caolina. one year. $16.85, two yean. 
$29.30. AH odier Hues one yeu. 
$2100, two years, $34iO. Payable in 
advance. 

Odier By»ly PuUicatknu news- 
papes: TIk Ches^jeake Pbst. The 
ft»rtein<w* Tunes, Tl» Tidewuer 
News. Bnaswkk Tnr.es-Gaz«!e, In- 
depoidait Messeiger, Dinwiddie 
Ntoiar. The PeMstwrg Moniuw. 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday, July 8. 1992 3 



Mayor, and others 
travel to Houston 
to receive award 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 



Two weeks ago, I travelled to 
Houstai, Texas, with Captain E.E. 
Rorrer, commanding officer of the 
Third Police Precinct, and Card 
Williams, chairperson of C.AS.E., 
to receive the "Mayors' National 
Livability 
Award." 
Mayors 
from more 
than 200 cities 
across the 
nation were 
nominated to 
this presti- 
gious award, 
which was 
presented by a 
member of 
President 
Bush's staff. 
The award 
sipifies that 
Virginia 
^___^___^___ Beach is one 
of the safest 
cities in the country in which to 
reside and was given as the result 
of our C.A.R.E. (Community 
Action Resource and Empower- 
ment) team. 

The C.A.R.E. committee 
originated in November, 1990 and 
was originally known as 
N.S.D.C.C. (Neighborhood Swvicc 
Delivery Coordination Committee). 

C.A.R.E. is a project sponsored 
by our police department and a 
myriad of city human service 
agencies. Its immediate function is 
to provide the physical safety 
necessary for rehabilitation of 
"high risk" neighborhoods in which 
public order is deteriorating. Its 
long-term goals are to create 
community pride and enable the 
residents to maintain control of 
their own neighborhoods. 

Some of the human service 
deparunents involved in this 
endeavor are: housing, parks and 
recreation, fire, library .school, 
social services, health, public 
works, code enforcement, zoning 



The awaid signifleg 
that Vliginla Beach 
is one of the safest 



cities in the country 
in which to reside. 

and mental health. Essentially, the 
program involves an intensive, 
multi-faceted attack on many of the 
ills of a "targeted" neighborhood 
simultaneously. 

The Third Police Precinct was 
chcwen for originating the "pilot" 
program in 1990, after 1 1 "at risk" 
communities were identifled in our 
city. On November 8, 1990, the 
Assistant City Manager Hector 
Rivera formed the original 
N.S.D.C.C. group and on Decem- 
ber 15, 1990, the Third Police 
Precinct opened the city's first 
C.A.R.E. office in the Princeton 
Lakes/Williams Village apartment 
complex. 

This C.A.R.E. office offered full- 
time police presence and was 
supported by a confederation of 
human service agencies. The 
private sector soon began to 
participate, a tenant's organization 
was formed and before long, a 
dramatic reduction in crime and 
fear was noted in the neighborhood. 

Several months later, a C. A.R£. 
office was opened in the Lake 
Edward section, which has also 
shown great success. Since them, 
this "pilot" program of community 
policing and human services has 
qvead to include several other 
troubled neighborhoods throughout 
the city with positive, measurable 
results. 

The Third Police Precinct's 
substations were part of a commu- 
nity policing philosophy known as 
P.O.P. (Problem Oriented Polic- 
ing). This is a type of policing that 

a Sm mayor, Pag« 4 



Predicting performance 
in tlie U.S. Wiiite House 



Unless they are comatose, most 
Americans are now aware that 
three campaigns are in full swing 
for those seeking the office of 
president of the United States. The 
candidates, declared and unde- 
clared, can be seen on television 
daily, heard on radio and read 
about in practically every newspa- 
per and 
magazine. 

With all of 
this informa- 
tion, some of 
which may be 
misinforma- 
tion, how can 
We the People 
determine 
who will make 
the best 
president 
during these 
troubled 
times? James 
David Barber, 
former 
professor of 
political 
science at 
Yale Univer- 
■ sity and 
chairman of the department of 




political science at Duke Univer- 
sity, offers some interesting 
suggestions in his book, The 
Presidential Character. 

"When a citizen votes for a 
presidential candidate he m^es, in 
effect, a prediction. He chooses 
from among the contenders the one 
he thinks (or feels, or guesses) 
would be the best president. He 
operates in a situation of immense 
uncertainty. If he has a long voting 
history, he can recall time and time 
again when he guessed wrong." 

Concerning the voter's dilemma. 
Barber continues, "He listens to the 
commentators, the politicians, and 
his friends, then adds it all up in 

D Sm predicting, Pag* 7 




Virginia Beach Sun staff photo 



Umbrellas, chairs, towels, radios, suntan oils and plenty of people visited Virginia Beach 
this past July 4 weekend. 



Young minds invited into kindergarten 




'You can't catch me. You can't 
catch me," my three-year-old 
squeals as she dashes away from 
the incoming tide. Then, giggling, 
she flips her pigtails and chases the 
receding waters back into the 
ocean. Ah, the good ol' summer 
time! 

I turn back 
to my reading 
Just in time for 
my six-year- 
old son to 
land, sandy 
and wet, 
smack in the 
middle of my 
lap. "I need 
some more 
energy sticks," 
he laughs. 
"Me, too. I'm 
starving" joins 
in my daugh- 
ter. 

I remind 
them of the 
chicken legs, 
apples, pickles 
and pretzels (Code Name: energy 
sticks) they've consumed in the 
past two hours. "There's only eight 
energy sticks left," I offered. 
"That's OK." decides my son. 
"that's four for each of us. Four and 
four is eight you know." 

For the hundredth time this 
summer. I am impressed with the 
mountain of knowledge my son 
gained in his kindergarten year. 
Virginia Beach teachers, along with 
many teachers across the nation, 
have changed the way they invite 
young minds into the world of 
academia. Paper and pencil, drill 



For the hundredth time. I am impressed 

with the mountain of knowledge my son has 

gained in his kindergarten year. 



The VBEA 
Report 

Lisa Guthrie, 
president of the 
Virginia Beach 
Education Asso- 
ciation. 



and kill memorization, and rigid 
rows of quiet students have been 
replaced with techniques that 
encourage thinking and practical 
application of knowledge. 

As a teacher of the very young 
for ttw past 15 years, I have been 
most impressed over the past two 
years with the jumps our kindergar- 
ten and first grade students are 
making in math. Long before they 
manipulate symbols on a page, they 
are learning problem solving 
techniques. Long before they count 
to one hundred, they are learning 
place value. 

I'd like to share with parents of 
the very young two games that I've 
adapted in many settin'gs to 
entertain and teach my young 
charges. My daughter frequently 
requests to play one of these (using 
sugsu- packets) in restaurants during 
the luU between waitress and food. 
I learned the Hand Game and the 
Over and Under game last summer 
as I packed away math books and 
studied the use of manipulative in 
primary classrooms. 

I play a magician during the 
Hand Game. I ask a member of the 
audience to count a given number 
of objects (Cubes, sugar packets, 
toothpicks, etc.) into my hand. 
Then I place both my hands behind 
my back and divide the objects 
between them. Next, I quiz the 
audience to see if they remember 



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the number of objects that were 
counted into my hand. When the 
correct number is recalled, I bring 
both hands to the fronL Always 
opening my right hand first, I 
challenge my audience to tell me 
how many objects it has and how 
many objects must be hidden in the 



closed left hand. After several 
trials, a member of the audience 
becomes the magician. 

Using the same concepts, Over 
and Under is played with an 
inverted bowl. Tlie audience is 
asked to close its eyes after the 
objects have been counted on top of 
the inverted bowl. The magician 
then puts some of the objects under 
the bowl and says, "One, two, 
three, look and see!" The audience 




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HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



□ New SubsCTiption D Renewal 

Please mail this coupon with your check fo: 

SUN, 138 S. Rosemont Rd., Virginia Beach, VA 23452 

RATES: Within 40 miles of Virginia Beach: 

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4 Virginia Beach Sun, Wednesday. July 8. 1992 



May DUI 
arrests at 
102 persons 



The Virginia Beach Police 
Department recently announced the 
results of its Sekctive Enforcenwnt 
Team's cffwts in DUI enforcemmt 
The team is currently com|nised 
of five officers and one sergeant, 
working primaily 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. 
In addition to their regularly 
scheduled hours these ofTicers woric 
additional overtime hours paid for 
by a DUI overtime grant furnished 
by the Division of MotOT Vehicles. 
During the month of May this 
team arrested 102 persons for 
Driving Under the Influence of 
alcohol and other drugs, issued an 
additionial S07 traffic summonses, 
made 34 misdemeanor arrests and 
three felony arrests. 

In addition to the arrests and 
summonses, this team responded as 
a primary unit to 167 calls for 
service, as an assist unit to 47 calls 
for service, ran 17 breath tests and 
investigated a total of ,43 accidents 
including 2 fatalities. 

The Selective Enforcement Team 
works out of Special Operations 
and is supavised by Sergeant M.T. 
Chiarizia. 




Godwin receives traffic safety excellence award 

Hats off to Officer F. Dean Godwin of the Virginia Beach Police Department, the recent 
recipient of the John T. Hanna Award. The award, presented by Concerned Citizens Advo- 
cating TraHIc Safety (CCATS). recognizes traffic safety excellence in Hampton Roads. 
Godwin currently works in three different areas of the police department - the Fatal Ac- 
cident Crash Team (FACT), the Selective Enforcement Team and the Motor Carrier Team. 



Computer group to 
meet at the library 

The Tidewater PeiK;htree User's 
Group will meet on Wednesday, 
July 8, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the 
Virginia Beach Central Library, 
4 100 Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

The session will be on "Peachtrec 
Complete Point of Sale" (scanning 
bar code labels for over-the-counter 
sales). 

To add your company's name to 
the TPUG mailing list call 727- 
9767 in Hampton. 

For more information on the 
session call 431-3070. 



ByLEECAHILL 

Virginia Beach Sun City Counci Reporter 

Fifteen Virginia Beach buildings 
have been recommended for nomi- 
nation to the National Register of 
Historic Places. 

The recommendations were in- 
cluded in the final draft of the Ar- 
chitectural Survey report, presojted 
to City Council last week by con- 
sultants, Frazier Associates, of 
Staunton. 

Also, the report recommends the 
creation of two historic districts - 
Oceana and Seatack, and Virginia 
Beach resort area as a historic mul- 



I^Aayor, and other, retrieve award 



D Continued From Pago 2 

many major police departments 
across the nation have experi- 
mented with for years. 

The concept of community 
policing is based upon a new 
philosophy. Instead of simply 
treating calls for police assistance 
as individual episodes, it considers 
that what appears to be an indi- 
vidual incident may actually be 
ccxinected to a series of events that 
will require police attention again. 
Therefore, the program is aimed at 
curing the disease as opposed to 
simply continuing to treat the 



symptoms of a sick neighboiliood. 

P.OP. brand community policing 
represents an entire philosophy of 
caring for a community; not just a 
set of rules or procedures. It 
stresses listening to the public to 
best evaluate and address their 
problems. 

Again, this is being accom- 
plished with the help of an army of 
brother and sister agencies within 
the city government; giving new 
meaning to the term "team work." 

This article yvas compiled 
through the courtesy of Sergeant 
Grant Wylie, Third Precinct, city of 
Virginia Beach Police Department. 



tiple resource area. 

The survey also recommends 
completion of the reconnaissance 
survey of the northern part of Vir- 
ginia Beach and of the southern part 
of the city. 

William T. Frazier, who pre- 
sented the report, said that die sur- 
vey includes 200 pn^)erties primar- 
ily in the northern part of the city. 
He pointed out that 417 ptopcttics 
had been surveyed previously and 
that some, such as Thoroughgood, 
are already on the Nation Register. 

The survey expands the survey 
work completed by the Department 
of Historic Resources in the city in 
the 1960s and 1970s and a city sur- 
vey in the late 1980s. The new 
^irvey incudes the northern two- 
thirds of the^ity bounded by Indian 
River Road. North Landing Road 
and stretching across to the ocean- 
front at Sandbridge Beach. Not in- 
cluded were Camp Pendleton, 
Seashore State Park, Oceana Naval 
Air Station, Dam Neck Fleet 
Combat Training Center, Little 
Creek Amphibious Base and Fort 
Story. 

The city already has 11 locally- 
designated historic overlay areas and 
12 National Register properties. 
Particular emphasis in the current 
survey was placed on the original 
community of Virginia Beach be- 
cause if fell under the guideline (for 
the National Register) referring to 
highly-direatened piopaties. 



The 15 properties 

listed as potential nominations to 
the National Register include: 

Cooke House, 320 51st Street, 
one of only two Frank Lloyd 
Wright-designed houses in Virginia 
and the only one which has not 
been moved. 

Cavalier Hotel-on-the-Hill, well- 
preserved example of a luxury resort 
hotel built in the first quarter of the 
20th century. 

Edgar Cayce Hospi- 
tal/Association for Research and 
Enlightenment, 67th Street and At- 
lantic Avenue, one of the few sur- 
viving early 20th century iHiildings 
along the northern stretch of the 
oceanfifonL 

Broad Bay Manor, 1710 Dey 
Cove Drive, reflects the changes in 
architectural plan and style in 
Princess Anne County - it began as 
a one-room, one-story dwelling in 
the first quarter of the 19th century. 

Fentress Farm House, 1172 
Salem Road, well-preserved 
"Federal" period farmhouse from the 
first quarter of the 19lh century. 

Church Point Manor House, 
Church Point Road, the only re- 
maining brick, well-shaped Victo- 
rian vernacular dwelling in the sur- 
veyed area. 

Greystone Manor/Masury House, 
515 Wilder Road, significant for 
both its historical association as an 

B Sm MORE, Pag* 7 



Sensational 




Young minds 
invited into 
l(indergarten 



15 Virginia Beach buildings 
added to the National Register 



Contfnufd From Pag« 3 

opois their eyes and tells the 
number of objects that are top of 
the bowl. They then deduce how 
many objects must be under the 
bowl. 

During both games, make sure 
the audience counts the original s^ 
of objects and ends each turn with a 
sentence. For example, 'Two over 
and one under equals three cubes." 
As young children become moie 
adept at this type of thinking, they 
can accurately predict how mwy 
more of something is needed as 
well as how many will be left if 
part is taken away. A students 
move through the curriculum, they 
are further challenged at each level. 

A popular game for students 
learning probability and statistics is 
the game of Pig. Using a pair of 
dice, a student tries to be the first to 
reach 100. Each player, in turn, 
rolls the dice as many times as they 
want, mentally keeping a running 



total of the sum. A plays' s!q)s 
rolling whenever tbey wi^. The 
playo* then records the total for diat 
turn and adds it to the total bom 
other turns. 

A player will receive a zero fw 
any round in which he rolls a 1. If a 
player rolls a 1 on both dice, he 
will lose all points earned from 
previous rounds. Stiulents, fx 
families, can Uien woik u^ether to 
devekq) strate^es for winning as 
they come more familiar widi the 
game. 

Whatever Uieir level, be an active 
participant in your children's 
pursuit of knowledge. Meet with 
their teaches, ask for strategies you 
can use at home, volunteer a few 
hours at school if you can. The 
strength of our public schools, 
indeed the strength of our next 
generation, may well depend on the 
alliances formed between teachers 
and parents. 

Ttus week's article was compiled 
by Vickie Hendley, VBEA vice 
president. 



Rescue Squad Beachfest party set 



By RICK SCHOEW 
Special to The Virginia Beach Sun 

The Virginia Beach Volunteer 
Rescue Squad will hold a Beachfest 
party on Friday, July 10 from 5 to 
10 p.m. and Saturday. July 11 from 
noon to 10 p.m. at the 24th Street 
OceanfrontPailc. 

The public is invited to hear live 
music on Friday, with Ernie 
LeBeau, and on Saturday wiUi Fast 
Forward and Coolin Out 

The proceeds from Beachfest will 
be used to help recruitment and 
fundraising efforts of the Virginia 
Beach Rescue Squad, which is part 



of the largest all-volunteer emer- 
gency medical services system in 
die United States. 

Last year the Beach R^cue Squad 
responded to more than 8,000 
emergency calls for help without 
charge. "Beachfest is one way resi- 
dents can support diis vital com- 
munity service and have fun doing 
it," said Herb Mahcr, chairman of 
BeachfesL 

A variety of foods and beverages 
will be sold. Admissicm is a $1 do- 
nation. Free valet bicycle parking 
will be available. 

For more information contact 
Rick Schoew at 459-3635. 



Cricl(et on the Hearth show set 



The Cricket on the Hearth Craft 
Show will be held on July 10. 11 
and 12 at die Pavilion. 
Admission will be charged 
Sponsored by die Preceptor Al- 
pha Xi chapter of Beta Sigma Phi, 
proceeds will benefit Ute Spina Bi- 



fada Association of Tidewater's 
Brace Fund, United Cerebral Palsy 
of Southeastern Virginia, Seton 
House, area sheltCTs for die home- 
less and other local charities. 

Call 547-3738 for more infcnma- 
tion. 



Lynnhaven House re-enacts history 



The Lynnhaven House will per- 
form demonstrations on essential 
18th century oa;u|»tions on Satur- 
day, July 18 from noon to 4 p.m. 

The Lynnhaven House is located 
off Independence Boulevard at 4405 



WishartRoad. 

Admission is $2 for adults and $1 
for students seven to 17 years of 
age. For Boy Scouts and Girl 
Scouts in uniform or with identifi- 
cation, admission is 500. 



Seniors 



dDnig Emporiumr 

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201 E. Utile Creek Road 

^AdjaceiU to Drug Emporium. 

Wards Corner) 

588-1487 



Lynnhaven Fish House serving freshness, quality and value 



This is no fish story - we are 
simply the best 

Virginia Beach is the home of 
the Lynnhaven Fish House 



Restaurant. The 160-seater restau- 
rant, widi a stained glass b^k bar 
lounge, a raw bar and a lobsta tank 
is situated on top of a fishing pier 



HAMPTON 

4033 W. IHsfcury Blvd. 

(Locaed tnstde Drug Emporium) 

826-6760 



Store Houre: 

Monday - Friday 9:00 - 7 30 
Saturday 9:00 - 6:00 




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overlooking the Chesapeake Bay. 
Every table has a full view of the 
Bay, die Chesapeake Bay Bridge- 
tunnel, die beach and hundreds of 
sunbathers. The Lynnhaven Fish 
House is die only seafood restaurant 
in die area with the largest vaiety 
of fresh fish. 

The owners, Tom and Chris 
Kynis, opened the restaurant in 
1979. It has been written up in 
travel and restaurant section of pub- 
lications from The New York 
Times to local and state newspapCTS 
and magazines. 

Chef J<»eph Zaremski, a grad- 
uate of Johnson & Wales Culinary 



University, is the person in charge 
of die kitchen. The Kyruses call 
him Uic "chief of stafT of creating 
delightAil tastes. 

Local fresh fish is on the menu 
daily, complemented by various 
sauces, die creations of die Kyrus 
family and Chef Zaremski. The 
Fish House has a select menu and 
some of the specialties include 
Oysters Rockfellcr. cockles, lob- 
ster, filet mign(»i and New York 
strip steak. 

Many £ami-raised and ocean 
fish are ftown in daily, gujuaiteeing 
dieir freshness. Tom Kyrus Sates, 
"I don't eat frozen fish. Why 



The Lynnhaven 
Fish House 
Restaurant 




OveHooking The 

C^mpemkeBmy 

In Virginm Bekcb 

Serving Lunch k Dinner DaQv 

11:W ••m. to 10:30 p.iii. LoMtMoa 

top of the Lynnhcven Pyer am the 

Chesapeake Bey, Siore Drive ud 

^eriish Roed • 481-0003 



CREEKMORE 
HARDWARE 

If It's Hardware, We Have It 

• Paint • Lawn & Garden 

Suf^ies • Plumbing • Hand 

& Power Tools 

LOCALLY OWNED & 
OPERATED SINCE 1949 

1303 Bair^ridge Boulevard 
Chesapeake 
545-5332 



should you?" R-eshncss, quality, 
service and value arc our objectives, 
says Chris Kyrus, the managing 
partner. 

Desserts are prepared especially 
for die Fish House by a local baker 
on a daily basis, and according to 
instructions by Chef Zaremski. 
Fresh fruits are served complimen- 
tary at dinner for die late sitting. 

From soup to dessert, the 
restaurant has been hon<H-ed annu- 
ally and selected as "the best 
seafood restaurant," "die best family 
restaurant," "the best luncheon" airf 
is the recipient of the Popular 
Choice Award 1992 by PortFolio 
Magazine. 



^Ml I i\M ... 

lil SM ()( k, \1.|). 



OcuIq)ia«icft 

Reconstructive Surgeon 

Bogd Certified Qphftahndogist 



533-Lros (5437) 

MedicdTowa Executive Tower 

Norfolk Hu^xmi 

Medkarc and Chunpn 

pMtfc^imt AU iMura^e flied. 



TODAY'S THE 



STOP SMOKING 



■■ 



VifKinia Beach Sun, Wednesday. July 8. 1992 i 



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yfedding Coverage Starting at $475 



1222 Executive Blvd., Suite 105 
Chesapeal<e, Virginia 23320 
(804) 547-9069 • (804) 547-2565 



Richard MukJez 
Photographer 



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Manufacturers of Fine Jewelry 

Repairs Done On Premises 

Custom Work 

Appraisals 



681 N. Battlefield Blvd. 

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Chesapeake, VA 23320 

(Across from Ches. Gen. Hosp.) 

436-1920 



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lohtn you can [oofi 



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Call 422-0887 to schedule your consultation. 

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No Wedding Is Too Large or Small 

All Equipment Available 

No Charge for Consultation and Set-up 



420-8000 



Jackie Hutcheson 




Comer of South Military & Greenbrier Parkway 
Next to Norfolk Paint Co. 



• • • 



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Norfolk, Va. 23518 

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Planning a wedding takes many hours of 

preparation. With yotir busy schedule, our 

16 years of experience will help you with 

all of your plans with any size budget. 

Our service is AT NO COST TO YOU! 

Our Services Include: 



• Wedding & Reception Sites 

• Honqrmoon Anrangements 

• Outdoor Ceremonies 

• Rehearsal Dinners 

• Bridal Showere 

• Hotel Rooms & Cottages 
For Out-Of-Town Guests 



• Food & Beverage Planning 

• Caterers 

• Riotographers 

• Cake 

• Florist 

• Vldeographer 

• Formal Wear 



DJ*s & Bands including 
Ernie LeBeau & The Beach Blasters 

481-4336 



6 ViTRinia Beach Sun. Wednesday, July 8. 1992 







■•• ^- '■" 




Members of the Bayside Area Library Youth Commission paint faces at Backyard Bonanza. 



Virginia Beach firefighters hold training session demonstrations throughout the Backyard 
Bonanza. 



More than 500 attend VWC's Backyard Bonanza 



More than 500 people and 32 city, community anc civic organizations 
participated in the first Virginia Wesleyan College Neighbors Council 
Backyard Bonanza, held recently on Rose Hall Lawn at Virginia Wesleyan 
College. 

It was a neighborhood fair held to familiarize residents, particularly 
children, with opportunities for summer activities and community 
resources in the area of Virginia Wesleyan College. 

Participating groups included: My Daddy's Deli; Third Police Precinct 
Citizen's Advisory pommittee; Virginia Beach Police Dept., Community 
Relations: Video Express; Virginia Wesleyan College, Office of 
Admission; Girl Scouts; Bayside Kiwanis Club; Newtown Road 
Elementary School; Children's Hospital of Kings Daughters, Atlantic 
Circle; Precision Kutts; Marlin Soccer Camp; Lady Marlin Softball Camp; 
Virginia Beach Field Hockey; Virginia Beach Fiie Education; N.Y. Jewelry 
and Gifts; Diamond Lake Civic League; Share Program; Bayside Area 
Library Youth Commission; Optimist Club of Bayside; Heritage United 
Methodist Church; Norfolk Academy Summer Programs; State Farm 
Insurance; Virginia Wesleyan College. Adult Studies Program; Hardbodies; 



Burger King; If It's Paper; Shaklee Products; Virginia Zoo; Virginia 
Lifesaving Museum; Good Samaritan Episcopal Church; Virginia 
Wesley^' GoHege Student Ecological Awareness League; and 7-11 
Southland Corporation. 

Entertainment was provided by the Bayside Area Library Youth 
Commission Puppet Show, Norfolk Academy Young People's Theater 
Program, recording artist Oman Chandler, The B.C.'s (The Building 
Children) and Norfolk Academy Chamber Singers. 

The Virginia Wesleyan Neighbors Program was developed in 1987 with 
the formation of the Virginia Wesleyan Neighbors Council, a group 
composed of community leaders from neighborhoods surrounding the 
college. Its purpose is to develop an information channel which promotes 
cohesiveness among residents of the participating communities; to address 
issues of concern to participating communities; to explore matters of 
mutual interest; and to provide challenges and opportunities for residents to 
enjoy the athletic, cultural, and educational a;tivities available at Virginia 
Wesleyan College. 




Newtown Road Elementary School children help staff an arts 
and crafts table at Backyard Bonanza. 





Neighborhood chitiren ask questions at a Virginia Zoo display. 



Virginia Beach Police officers staff a community relations table at the Backyard Bonanza. 




A member of the Third Poltoe Precinct Citizens' Advisory Committee sells homemade goods to 
an Inc^iring Ba*yard Bonanza guest. 



The Bayside Kiwanis Club was among 32 groups sharing community informatton with resi- 
dents in the Virginia Wesleyan College area. 



wmmtm 



mmmm 




Virginia Beach Siui U)^ photos 

There's only so much room on the Virginia Beach board- 
walk, but bicycles are allowed beside the bike path. 







This past July 4 brought thousands of people to Virginia 
Beach's beaches. 

More scenes 
from July 4 
at the Beach 




Atlantic Avenue is always a good place to have fun on a mo- 
torcycle. 



Museum holds kid*s boating seminar 



TTie Lifc-Saving Museum, lo- 
cated on 24th Street and Atlantic 
Avenue, will hold a children's basic 
tx>ating safety seminar on Monday, 
July 13 from 10 a.m. until noon. 

The seminar will teach the chil- 
dren, ages eight to 12, how to have 
a safer summer at the be^h and on 



the water. Film and handouts will 
be used, and certificates will be 
awarded at the end. 

The cost is $4, and particiiants 
should bring a cold, canned drink. 

For reservations, call the Life- 
Saving Museum at 422-1587. 



Couples meet at recreation center 



The Bayside Community Recre- 
ation Center will hold the second 
meeting of its Adult Couples Club 
on Wedneaiay. July 15 at 7:30 
p.m. 

This month's activity will be a 
dinner at the center. All adult ccxi- 



ples ages 30 U) 45 are invited to 
have dinner. Children must slay at 
home. 

The cost is S2 a person and the 
deadline for registration is July 13. 

Call the Adult Activities Unit at 
460-7540 for further mfcmnatkm. 



Predicting performance 
in tiie U.S. Wiiite House 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday, July 8. 1992 7 



a Continued Front Pag* 2 

some rough way to produce his 
prediction and his vote . . . But he 
must choose in the midst of a cloud 
of confusion, a rain of phony 
advertising, a stoim of somons, a 
hail of complex issues, a fog of 
charisma and boredom, and a 
thunda of accusation and de- 
fense." 

Can you believe these comments 
were published in 1972, 20 years 
ago? They aptly sq)ply to 1992. 
Although this year's presidential 
campaign is unlike any other, the 
professor seems to have been 
prescient in his observations. 

He studied every presidoit from 
Washington to Nixon and con- 
cluded that each president fits into 
one of four distinct character 
categories, which he explains in 
detail. Briefly stated, active- 
positive presidents want most to 
achieve results; active-negatives 
aim to get and keep power, passive- 
positives are after affection; 
passive-negatives emphasize their 
dutiful service tuid civic virtue. 

While no individual president 
exacUy fits a CiOegory, the flrst four 
presidents conveniently illustrate 
his tiKory. George Washington, 
who established the legitimacy of 
Uk new government, was not 
seeking innovation, but stability. 
His dignity, aloof air of reserve and 
dedication to duty fit the passive- 
negative category. 

Our second president, John 
Adams, was given to work and 
worry. He was an active-negative 
president, a compulsive type, who 
brought us to the brink of war with 
France. He also presided over the 
nation's experiment in political 
repression with the Alien and 



Sedition Acts. Bart)er points out 
that the system somehow survived 
this presidency. 

The next pre»dent was Thomas 
Jefferson, who also had troubles 
and failures, but his character was 
clearly active-positive. He tq^piied 
his reason to orgiuiizing connec- 
tions witii Congress. His was an 
opeti visioi of what the country 
could be. He listened to all sides of 
a question and stated, "Every 
difference of opinion is not a 
difference of principle." 

The fourth president was James 
Madison, the constitutional scholar, 
serving at a time of great interna- 
tional turmoil. His character was 
closest to passive-positive. A 
compliant type, he suffered from 
irresolution and tried to compro- 
mise his way out of problems. The 
nation drifted into war. His 
administration's reiHitaticHi was 
saved by General Jackson's victory 
at New Orleans. 

Just how the incredible power of 
the American presidency is wielded 
and where die President leads the 
nation, depends to an alarming 
degree on Uie quirks, the idiosyn- 
crasies of one very human indi- 
vidual. 

That is why We the People must 
study the chauracter of each candi- 
date, predict for ourselves how he 
will perform in the White House 
and vote accordingly. 

"Character," a word from the 
Greek f(»- engraving, is what lifie 
has maiked into a man's being. 
Barber writes, "Character is the 
way the president orients himself 
toward lUe - not for the moment, 
but enduringly ... The problem is 
to understand what in the personal 
past foreshadows die Presidential 
future." 



Water talks continue at ceremony 



□ Continued From Pag* 1 

said that he is intelligent and per- 
sonable, gets along with everyone 
on council and will seek a consen- 
sus in council. 
Borough. 

Friends and relations witnessed 
Uie ceremony, but Branch, proba- 
bly, had the largest contingent in- 
cluding his grandmother. Iris 
Branch. Prior to the meeting 



Thomas McAfee, a nephew, sat in 
his uncle's council seat and had his 
picture taken. 

After the meeting. Moss' older 
son sat in his fadier's seat for a 
picture. 
In nominating Sessoms, Baum 
Forma! seating of councilmem- 
bers, Obemdorf said, was assiped 
according to seniority wiUi those 
who had the longest service on 
council seated closest to the mayor. 



"Beach, Bay and Backways" set 



"Beach, Bay and Backways," an 
art exhibit by Ann Cabral and Joan 
Kerrigan, will be on exhibit at the 
Life-Saving Museum of Virginia 
from July 14 through September 
8. 

Admission is charged. 

The museum is open Monday 



through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. and from noon to 5 p.m. on 
Sunday. Admission is $2.50 for 
adults, $2 for military and senior 
citizens, and $1 for young people 
six to 18. 

The museum is located at 24th 
Street and Atlantic Aveniw. 



More added to National Register 



Continued From Page 4 

early gambling club and its unique 
architectural character. 

Ferry Farm, Cheswick Court, a 
rare surviving early 18tii century 
dwelling in an historic setting. It is 
the site of tite third courthouse and 
the location of the local witchcract 
trails. 

Tallwood, 1676 Kempsville 
Road, example of the type of house 
found in Virginia Beach from the 
later 18th century through tiie early 
19th century. 

704 King's Grant Road, one of 
Uie few remaining tiirn-of-d)e-19tii 
century houses remaining in the 
city. 



DeFord/Hunter house, an exam- 
ple of a "Federal Period" farm 
house. 

Hermitage, 4200 Hermitage 
Road, one of a small group of 
houses surviving from the early 
19th century in Uie city. 

Kenstock, 2416 Kenstock Drive, 
early 20Ui century French Colonial 
Revival house. 

Sajo Manor House, Sajo Farm 
Road, an extremely large and ele- 
gant mid-20U) century Colonial 
Revival house in Virginia Beach. 

Cooke House, 77th Street, an 
example of the large two-story 
beach cottage built in Uie nwUi end 
of Uie beach in Uie early 20Ui cen- 
tury. 



Dance for special people announced 



A dance fot i^ysically and men- 
tally handica^iiBd peqile from Vir- 
ginia Beach will be held Saturday, 
July 18 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at 
Uie Bow Creek Recreation Center, 
3427 Clubhouse Road. 

The dance will be spon«}red by 
Uie Virginia Beach I>epartment of 
Paries and Recreation and CLASP 
(Citizens Loving All Special Peo- 
ple). 



Participation is free. Refresh- 
ments will be served, and door 
prizes will be given. The latest hits 
will be played. Parents and 
guardians are weteome, but chaptf- 
ones are always present. 

Transp(»tation is available from 
your area at $6 per rouiidtiip per 
individual. Call Carolyn Tipold tt 
588-8693 by July 1. 

For further information call Harry 
Baird at 486-31 10. 



Pubic Notic* 



CLASP business 
meeting announced 

CLASP (Citizens Loving All 
Special People) will hold its 
monthly business meeting on 
Tuesday, July 14 at 7:30 p.m. at 
the home of Harry and Juanita 
Baird, 3900 Rumfnd Lane. 

All vMing membo^ are adced u> 
attend. All (Xher inter^ted perscms 
ve also invited. 

For furUwr infcsmatioa all ftery 
BainlM 486-3110. 



Take notice, that on July 17, 
1992 at 10:00 o'clock A.M.. at Uie 
premises of 4753 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach. Virginia 
23462, Uie undersigned will sell at 
public aiKtion, for cash only, re- 
serving the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicle: 
1984 PC»mAC B(»WEVILLE 
VIN: lG2AN69AffiB217217 

2t-4 
lt7-iVBS 

t»uMcNotic» n 

Auction: 1982 Pontiac J2000 
#5975 
Serial fitmbet: «1G2AB69Q1C- 



7551202 
Auction date: July 27, 1992 
Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy., Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves Uie right to Bid. 

28-5 
It7-gVBS 

I PubBc NoWc» I 

Auction: 1983 VW Rabbitt 
#5861 

Serial Number #1VWDC0171- 
DV067197 
Auction date: July 27, 1992 
Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company. 7000 N. Military 
Hwy., Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves Uie right to Bid. 

28*( 
ItT-gVBS 

PubHc Nollc» I 

Auction: 1980 Dodge Colt #5859 
Serial Number: #4H24KA450- 
3465 
Auction date: July 27. 1992 
Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy., Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves Uie right to Bid. 

28-7 
lt7.8VBS 



2Sf3 
It7-8VBS 



Public NoliC* 



FAMILY COURT OF THE 
STATE OF NEW YORK 

COUNTY OF BRONX 

In the Matter of the Guardianship 
of the Person and Custody of 

JANICE DARLINE CORTES 
a/k/a JANICE DARLINE MATTEI 
and LADY MONIQUE MATTEI 

IN THE NAME OF THE PEO- 
PLE OF THE STATE OF NEW 
YORK 

TO; JOSE RAUL MATTAI a/k/a 
JOSE I^ATTEI Whereabouts Un- 
known 

Docket NOS.B3373-4/92 

A verified petition having been 
filed in this Court alleging Uiat Uie 
above-named children in the care of 
CARINAL MCCLOSKEY CHIL- 
DREN'S AND FAMILY SER- 
VICES are abandoned and/or per- 
manentiy neglected children as de- 
fined by Section 384-b of Uie So- 
cial Services Law. 

YOU ARE HEREBY SUM- 
MONED to ^pear before Uiis court 
at 900 Sheridan Avenue, Bronx, 
New York, in Part 1, on the 2nd 
day of September 1992, at 9:00 in 
the forenoon of said day to show 
cause why the Court should not 
enter an order committing 
guardianship of Uie person and cus- 
tody of said children to the 
petitioning agency for purpose of 
adqition. 

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE Uiat if 
the relief in Uie petition is granted 
said children may be adopted with 
the consent of said authorized 
agency without your consent and 
wiUwut furUier notice to you. 

PLEASE TAKE FURTHER 
NOTICE, that your failure to ap- 
pear shall constitute a denial of an 
interest in said children, which de- 
nial may result in transfer or 
commitment of Uie children's cus- 
tody and guardianship, or the adop- 
tion of said children, all without 
furUier notice to you. 

PLEASE TAKE FURTHER 
NOTICE, Uiat you have a right to 
be represented by an attorney; if 
you cannot afford an attorney, Uie 
Court, upon your appearance, will 
appoint one to represent you free of 
charge. 

Dated: Bronx, New York 

June 26, 1992 

BY ORDER OF THE OJURT 

RAYMOND JAMET. Clerk of 
the Court 



Public Nolle* 



Take notice, that on July 10. 
1992 at 10:00 o'clock A.M.. at Uie 
premises of 4753 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462, Uie undersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash only, re- 
serving the right to bid, the 
following moto- vehicle: 
1984 TOYOTA COROLLA 
VIN: JT2AE83E1E3066289 

28-1 
It7-8VBS 



Public Notice 



In Uie Clerk's Office of Uie Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 29Ui day of JUNE. 
1992. 

Billy Wayne Wallace, Jr. Plain- 
tiff, against Donna Darlene Dillon 
Wdlace, Defendant 

Docket #CH92- 1378 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is for the. 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds of one 
year separation. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed Uiat Uie defendant is 
not a resident of the State of Vir- 
ginia, the last known post office 
address being P.O. Box 701, Cot- 
ton Valley, LA. It is ordered that 
Donna Darlene Dillon Wallace do 
appear on or before Uie 19Ui of Au- 
gust, 1992, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her interest in 
Uiis suit. 

It is further Ordered Uiat a copy of 
Uiis Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
TTie Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy — Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit. Cleric 

By: Raymond J. Bjoiicman, D.C. 

LeeAnn N. Barnes, p.q. 

1 1 101 Warwick Boulevard 

Newport News, Virginia 23601 

27-7 
4I7-22VBS 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: In Uie Cleric's Of- 
fice of Uie Circuit Court of Uie City 
of Virginia Beach, on Uie 12Ui day 
of June, 1992. 

In re: Name change of Ronald 
McKinley Shifflett, infant 

By: Lynn Marie Curtis, his 
natural moUier, I^titioners 

To: Paul Shiffiett, 625 Chain 
Street, Norristown. Pennsylvania 
19401 

IN CHANCERY 

#Ch92-1848 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came Lynn Marie Cur- 
tis. Petitioner and represented that 
Uie object of Uiis proceeding is to 
Uie effect name change of Uie above 
named infant Ronald McKinley 
Shiffiett, by Lynn Marie Curtis, 
his natural mother, and affidavit 
having b^n made and filed that 
Paul Shiffiett. a natural parent of 
said child is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 625 
Chain Street. Norristown. 
Pennsylvania 19401. 

It is Uierefore Ordered that Uie 
said Paul Shiffieu appear before 
Uiis Court wiUiin ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order and indi- 
cate his attitude toward Uie proposed 
name change, or oUierwise do what 
is necessary to protect his interest 
in Uiis matter. 

It is further Ordered Uiat a copy 6f 
Uiis Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 

D Contlnuad On Pag* S 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

PROPOSED HIGHWAY PROJECT 

SOUTH PLAZA TRAIL 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

All interested persons are advised that the Virginia De- 
partment of Transponation is hereby indicating its willing- 
ness to hold a Combined Location and E)esign Public Hearing 
concerning the proposed extension of South Plaza Trail from 
the intersection of Princess Anne Road (Route 165) to the 
intersection of South Independence Boulevard in the City of 
Virjginia Beach. 

Maps, drawings, and other information concerning the 
proposed project are available for public review in tiie De- 
partment of Transpwtation's District Office located at 1700 
North Main Street in the City of Suffolk, and in its Residency 
Office located at 1992 South Military Highway in the City of 
Chesapeake. 

Any interested citizen from the communities aff<Kted by 
this proposal may request that a Public Hearing be held by 
ending a written request to Mr. P.D. Gribok, Resident 
Engineer, Virginia Departn«nt of Transportation, P.O. Box 
1366, Chesapeake, Virginia 23327, on or before July 24, 
1992. In the event such a request is iw:eived, a further notice 
of the rime and pl^e of the hearing will be posted. 



\ 



Virginia D«partm«nt of Tran^wrtatlon 



8 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday, July 8. 1992 



□ Centinuad From Pag«7 

city. 
A copy teste: _ 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
Bjc Linda D. Jones, D.C. 
Waicox &. Savage 
Attorneys at Law 
1800 Sovran Center 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

25-7 
4t7-8VBS 



Public Notice 



Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall Build- 
ing, Municipal Center, Princess 
Anne Station, Virginia Eteach, Vir- 
ginia, on Tuesday, July 14, 1992, 
at 2:00 p.m., at which time the 
following applications will be 
heant 

CHANGE OF ZQNlNfi DT.S- 
TRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

PRINCESS ANNF BOROIinH 

1. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thclma Britt Harris for a Condi- 
tional Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-10 Residen- 
tial District to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
530 feet north of Indian River 
Road, 4140 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential District is for single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. The Comprdiensive 
Plan recommends use of this parcel 
for agricultural or residential land 
use consistent with the Plan poli- 
cies for Transition Area II. Said 
parcel contains 5.4 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

2. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Alice Britt, Mary E. Britt and 
Thclma V. Harris for a Conditiona l 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-10 Residen- 
tial District to AG-2 Agricultural 
District on certain property located 
on the North side of Indian River 
Road, 4010 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to AG- 
2 Agricultural District is for agri- 
cultural land use at a density no 
greater than 1 dwelling unit per 
acre. The Comprehensive Plan rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural or residential land use 
consistent with the Plan policies 
for Transition Area II. Said parcel 

contailns 6.8 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 
3. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thelma Britt Hauris for a Condi- 
tional Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-15 Residen- 
tial District to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
1030 feet North of Indian River 
Road, 4900 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential District is for single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
units pa acre. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this parcel 
for single family residential land 
use at a density no greater than 0.8 
dwelling units per acre. The Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use of 
this parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent with the 
Plan policies for Transition Area II. 
Said parcel contains 2 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
4. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thelma Britt Harris for a Condi- 
tional Change of Zoning njfjtricl 
Classification from AG-2 Agricul- 
tural District to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
on the North side of Indian River 
Road, 3960 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to R- 
40 Residential District is for single 
family residential land use at a den- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
units per acre. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this parcel 
for agricultural or residential land 
use consistent with the Plan poli- 
cies for Transition Area II. Said 
parcel contains 9.7 acres. 
WIINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
5. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thelma Briu Harris for a Condi- 
tional Change of Zoni ng District 
Classification from AG-1 Agricul- 
tural District to R-40 Residential 
District on certain property located 
620 feet North of Indian River 
Road, 3730 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
z(xiing classification change to R- 
40 Residaitial District is for single 
fanily residential land use at a doi- 
sity no greater than 0.8 dwelling 
units pa- acre. The CtMnix-ehensive 
Plan recommends ast of this parcel 
fcv apicullural or resi<totial land 
use consistent with the Plan poli- 
cies fw Transition Area II. Said 
parcel contains 12.9 acres. 
HWhTCESS ANNE B<»<XK3H. 
6. 
An Ordinance iqxn ^ftiankm 



of Alice Britt. Mary E. Britt and 
Thdma V. Harris for a Conditional 
Change of Zoning Diiitrict 
CUssification ban R-20 Readen- 
tial District to AG-2 Agricultual 
District on certain {voperty located 
on the North side of Indian River 
Road, 5600 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. The prcqxMed 
zoning classifkation diaige to AG- 
2 Agricultural District is for agri- 
cultural land use at a density no 
greater than 1 dwelling unit per 
acre. The ComfHehensive Pisa rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural or residential land use 
consistent with the Plan policies 
for Transition Area II. Said pucel 
contains 2.3 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNEBOROUGR 

7. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of James L. Miller, Trustee. Indian 
River Plantation, Inc., Indian River 
Country Club Estates, L.P., 
Thomas Vance and Robert Ripley 
for a Conditional Change of Zon- 
ing District Cla-ssificatinn frnm R. 
20 Residential District to AG-2 
Agricultural District on the follow- 
ing parcels: 

EaiCcLL Located 570 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 1420 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. 

EaiC^^ Located 1260 feet north 
of Indian River Ro»l beginning at a 
point 450 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

£ai£&L2: Located 3500 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 450 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

Pareel 4: Located 1440 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 

point 3720 feet west of West Neck 
Road. 

EaKSLi Located 2360 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 3480 feet more or less west 
of West Neck Road. 

Parcel 6: Located 4000 feet north 
of Indian River Ro»l beginning at a 
point 740 feet more or less west of 
West Neck Road. 

Parcel 7: Located 1990 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 4640 feet west of West Neck 
Road. 

The proposed zoning classifica- 
tion change to AG-2 Agricultural 
District is for agricultural land use 
at a density no greater than 1 
dwelling unit per acre. The Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use of 
this parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent with the 
Plan policies for Transition Area II. 
- Said parcels contain 115 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
8. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of James L. Miller, Trustee, Indian 
River Plantation, Inc.. Indian RiVer 
Country Club Estates, L.P., Dock- 
ery Lambert, Jr., Thomas Vance & 
Robert Ripley for a Conditippg] 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-10 Residen- 
tial District to AG-2 Agricultural 
District on the following parcels: 

Parcel I: Located on the north 
side of Indian River Road beginning 
at a point 2900 feet more or less 
west of West Neck RooL 

Parcel 2: Located on the north 
side of Indian River Road beginning 
at a point 2950 feet more or less 
west of West Neck RMd. 

£U££L2l Located on the west side 
of West Neck Road beginning at a 
point 750 feet more or less north of 
Indian River Road. 

The proposed zoning classifica- 
tion change to AG-2 Agricultural 
District is for agricultural land use 
at a density no greater than 1 
dwelling unit per acre. The Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use of 
this parcel for agricultural or resi- 
dential land use consistent with the 
Plan policies fw Transition Area II. 
Said parcels contain 97.5 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
9. 

An Odinance upon Application 
of Indian River Plantation. Inc., 
Thomas Vance and Robert Ripley 
for a Conditional Chanye of Tm^fng 
District Classification from AG-2 
Agricultural District to R-40 Resi- 
dential District on certain property 
located on the north side of Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
2240 feet more w less west of West 
N^k Road. The proposed zcxiing 
classification change to R-40 Resi- 
dential District is for single family 
residential land use at a density no 
greater than 0.8 dwelling units po' 
acre. The Comprehensive Plan rw;- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural or residential land use 
consistent with the Plan poUcies 
for Transition Area II. Said parcel 
contains 76.8 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 
10. 

An Ordinance upon ApplicatifX) 
of Indian River Plantation. Inc.. 
Thomas Vance and Robert Ripley 
for a Conditional Changf; of 7/rq\^g 
District Claayrifj^itffl from AG-1 
Agricultural District to R-40 R«i- 
(tential District (m certain pnqmty 
located 620 feet mvdi (rf Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
3750 (eex west of Wea ffeck RomI. 



The proposed zoning dassification 
chmge to R-40 Residential District 
is fw single family residential lanA 
use at a density no greain' than 0.8 
dwelling units per acre. The Com- 
inehensive Plan recommends use of 
this parcel fot agricultural or red- 
dentiiEkl land use consiiOait witfi the 
Plan policies for Traimtion Area n. 
Said parcel contains 22 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
11. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of James L. Miller. Trustee, Indian 
River nantation. Inc. and Indian 
River Country Club Estates. L.P. 
for a Conditional Change of Jxmmf 
Disaict Classincation ftom R-15 
Residential District to AG-2 Agri- 
cultural District on the following 
parcels: 

2uaLL. Located 340 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 540 feet mott <a less west of 
West Neck Road. 

£ai£fiL2: Located 1270 feet msth 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 3820 feet mcHre ot less west 
of West Neck Road. 

ESECdJl Located 1750 feet north 
of Indian River Road beginning at a 
point 5500 feet more m less west 
of West Neck Road. The proposed 
zoning classification change to AG- 
2 Agricultural District is for agri- 
cultural land use at a density no 
greater than 1 dwelling units per 
acre. The Comprdiensive Plaa rec- 
ommends use of this parcel for 
agricultural w resittential land use 
consistent with the Plan policies 
for Transition Area 11. Said parcel 
contains 102.5 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNEBOROUGR 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT- 
PRINCESS ANNE BORQiJfiH 
12. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Indian River Plantation. Inc. and 
Indian River Country Club Estates, 
LP. fa a Conditional Use Permit 



for a recreationa} facility of an oat- 
door nature (gdf course) on certain 
propaty located at the Northwest 
intersection of Indian River Road 
^ and West Neck RomI. Said parcel 
contains 180.4 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISIQNVARIANrR- 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROIinH 

13. 

Appeal from Decisions of Ad- 
ministrative OfTicen in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivisim 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Indian 
River Plantation/Briu Farm. Prop- 
erty is located at the ncffdiwest cor- 
ner of the intersection of West Neck 
Road and Indian River Road. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENT: 

14. 

Motion of the Planning Com- 
mission of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend the Vir- 
ginia Beach Comprehensive Plan to 
revise land use poUcies and recom- 
mendations affecting those parcels 
adjacent to and in the general vicin- 
ity of General Booth Boulevard 
from Oceana Boulevard to Princess 
Anne Road. 

NONCONFORMING USE: 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

15. 

Application of Rev. William H. 
Perry for the enlargonent of a non- 
conforming use on property located 
at 456 Rudder Road. Said parcel 
contains 13.200 squai'e feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith. CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

If you are physically disabled, 
hearing or visually impaired and 
need assistance, please call DONNA 
JOHNSTON at 427-4283 VOICE 
or TDD by July 10. 1992. 

27-4 
2t7-8VBS 



Pick Up The Virginia Beach Sun 
At Any Of These Locations: 



Dr. Vidao 

Aragona Shopping Center 

Open House Diner 

309 Aragona Boulevard 

Super Fresh 
Rosemont Road 

The Sun Building 

138 South Rosemont Road 

Marketplace 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Peoples Drug Store 

Hilltop 

Revco 

Hilltop 

Virginia Beach 
General Hospital 

First Colonial Road 

Hess's Sub Shop 

Great Neck Village 

Super Fresh 

Hilltop Plaza 

Holiday Food Store 
General Booth Boulevard 

Holiday Inn Park 
General Booth Boulevard 

Thomas Murphy 

1000 Pacific Avenue 

17th Street Surf Shop 
Pacific Avenue 

Sir Alton inn 

Mediterranean Avenue 

Aquarius Motel 

1909 Atlantic Avenue 

Comfort Inn 

2015 Atlantic Avenue 

Ocean Holiday 

25th and Atlantic Avenue 

Post Office 

Atlantic Avenue 

Ingram Pharmacy 

207 25th Street 

Princess Anne Motel 
25th and Atlantic Avenue 

SMhawk Motel 

26th and Oceanfront 

The Boardwalk Inn 

2604 Atlantic Avenue 

Seagull Motel 

27th and Atlantic Avenue 

Viking Motel 

2700 Atlantic Avenue 



MardiGraa Motel 

2802 Atlantic Avenue 
Oceanfront Inn 

27lh and Atlantic Avenue 

Dayabin 

Atlantic Avenue 

Sea Vacattoner 

34th and Atlantic Avenue 

Behredere Resort Motel 

30th and Atlantk: Avenue 

Waffte'a'n Things 

Corner of Pacific Avenue 
and Laskin Road 

Farm Fresh 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Phar-Mor 

1944 Laskin Road 

Texaco Food Mart 

1912 Laskin Road 

Peoples Drug Stors 

980 Laskin Road 

The Beach Pub 
1001 Laskin Road 

Shape's Salon 

1065 Laskin Road 

Belo Superntarket 

London Brklge 

Hilltop Inn 
1284 Laskin Road 

Farm Freah 

Laskin Road 

Marketplace 

Laskin Road 

Food Lion 

Outlet Mall 

Chamber of Commerce 

Pembroke Mall parking tot 

Annabelle's 
Pembroke Mall 

Food Lion 

Pembroke Mall 

Farm Freah 

Independence Boulevard 

Peoples Drug Store 

Indepencence Boulevard 

Bek} 

Northampton Boutovard 

Cricket Inn 
Northampton Boulevard 

Food Lion 

Newtown Road art Baker Road 



rAe Vli^nli Beach Sun 

For Home DeliveiQ^, News Or Mvenising, 
Cai 486-3430 



^D NETWORK 
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WOLFF TANNINQ BEOS -Htm 
Comnwrclal -Horn* Unit* From 
ttDB.OO. Larrpt -lolkMW-AcoMto- 
rlM. Monthly PaymonK Low i$ 
ltB.(».C«TodlV FREE NEWCotot 
C^alog. 1 -(00-228-6202. 

LAKE QASTON VA/NC 360 nUlM 
thofolino -Ovor 1 00 wMorfront Ml, 
SPECIAL SUMMER SALE. FREE 
LAKE MAP, Buyon Quid*. CalU 
writ* Tingl*wood Roally, 804-S36- 
2204. 1-(00-33S-88tt. Bo« 116 
Brac*y, VA 23619. 

FRIENDLV HOME PARTIES hu 
op*nlng( for damonatratort. No caati 
lnv**tm*nt. No Hrvic* charg*. High 
coinmlaalon and hoatatt awarda. 
Two calaloga, ovw 600 lt*m*. Call 
1-800-468-4875. 

MyrtlaBaach RESORT VACATION 
RENTALS -Ocaanlronl condoa, 
houa^kaaplng includad. Indoor/out- 
door poolt, whirlpools, aaunaa, 
Ughtad tannia courts, putting gr**ns. 
Golf packagaa avallabla. Fr** bro- 
chur*: 1 -600-446-5653. 

DONATE YOUR CAR. Truck, 
Molorhom*, Boat, R*al Estat* 
Slarnpa, Coins, Coiaetbl**, to Foun- 
dation Sarving th* Blind I.R.S. tax 
daductbl*, FREE TOWINO; NEED 
NOT RUN 1-600-326-SS22. 

DRIVERS: START 24 CENTS -26 
CENTS. EARN TO 30 CENTS, 
HOME REGULARLY. FREE MEDI- 
CAL/DENTAL, RETIREMENT, 
61,000 TARP PAY, SAFETY BO- 
NUS, CONVENTIONALS. RE- 
QUIRE 23 YRS 6 1 YR OTR. 
HORNADY TRUCK LINE1-800-343- 
7S69. 

HAPPY JACK TRIVERMICIDE: 
R*cognlz*d sal*i •fftctlvaby U.S. 
Cantar For Vatarinary Madicln* 
againat hooK, round 6 lapaworms 
In doga 6 cats. Avallabla O-T-C at 
l**d t drugstoros. 

A WONDERFUL FAMILY EXPERI- 
ENCE. Scandinavian, Europaan, 
South Anwrlcan, Japanaaa high 
school exchang* studants arriving 
in August. Bacom* a hoat family/ 
AfTwrican Intarcultural Studant Ex- 
changa. Call Iran* (804) 746-S416 
or 1-800-SIBLING. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR 
THE SELF-EMPLOYED. Finally - 
Alfordabla, Coel-Elfacllva Hoapilal 
Insuranc*', Ssll Employ*d/Sinall 
Buslnaaaas. ADDITIONAL 140 b*n- 
*fltslCALLTOOAY1 1-800-828-4672 
('Und*rwrlt*r PFL LIFE) 

WE BUY MORTGAGES And Trust 
D**ds. Did You Sail Proparty? Ra- 
calvlng Paymants? Why WaitI Fast. 
Cash Nowl Any SIza -Nallonwkla. 
QraalPrlcaa.Call 1-60O-6SO-CASH 
(2274). Mortgagas Buyars of 
Amarlca. 

WHITEWATER RAFTING, Wast 
Virginia's Naw and Gaulay RIvars. 
July 4th spaclals. Call today for traa 
brochur* -1-600-633-RAFT. Orlft- 
A-BH, Inc., P.O. Box S8S, Fayatlavlla, 
WV 25840. 

Got a campground mambarship or 
timashara? W*ll take It. Amarkia's 
most succassf ul rasort raaala daar- 
Inghousa. Call Rasort Salas Infor- 



mallon loll fraa hotHna 1-800-423- port, Blackaburg. Monlgomary Co. 
5867. ElMloft. D.L. Board Auctkxis. 703- 

651-3551, 703-774-06S4. 
Handyman Spaclal -N*w on* room 

kig caUn raady to finiah. Woodad NASCAR Coliwtlbl** -Buy dlr*cl 
paro*l. $27,900 Brun*wlck County from Importer. Racing Chanpkin* - 
naar 1-85 and U.S. 58 90% financ- cars, haulers and sals. Whotasal* 
kig. 0wn*f 804-496-0320. onlyl 703-896-6136. 



Truck Own*r -Opwators -62,000 
sign-on bonus lor safe, quaMiad 
drivers with 6 months OTR np*rl- 
anoa. Tultion-fraa training avallabla 
for lnaiparl*nc*d drivers. 
northAmarlcan Van Lines, 1-800- 
348-2147, Depl. D475. 

Single drivers can EARN UP TO 
33« PER MILE . Our high volume o) 
ov*rdinansk)nal,ftal)*d,diop-d*ck 
freight enable* you to earn these 
top wages. E XTR A PAY lor special 
s*rv Ices means you make even 
moremoneyl AND RECEIVE DAILY 
EARNINISSPROTECTCNIOurnew 
•arninga plan ensurea your famNy 
will receive a steady, weakly In- 
come a* long aa your available lor 
work. TRISM SPECIALIZED CAR- 
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Drhrer teams can EARN UP TO 
44.S( PER MILE. Our high volume 
of commercial and government 
freight enables qualified dflverteams 
to earn the best wagea. MINIMUM 
MILEAGE GUARANTEE ANO 
MUCH MOREI You'll b*pakl routed 
miles for designated oommoditias 
and driv* only late- model, satellite- 
equipped conventionals for 
Am*rk»'s oklsat and largest muni- 
tk)ns hauler. One year OTR and 
COL requited. 1 -800-289-8768. TRI- 
STATE MOTOR TRANSIT CO. 
McQII Special Sarvkxa. 

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -Roomaand 
■ffici*ncl*s from $4S.00/day tot 
summer. Pool, CCTV, just step* 
from the ocean. It's the piirfact get- 
away. Cal Virginian 1-800-968-8988. 

AMERICAN RETIREMENT HOMES 
-$1,000t. Includes room, board, 
utilltias, 24 hr. nurse assisted am- 
bulaloty/non-ambulatory care. 
CharkHtesviile, Lexington, Norfolk, 
VA Beach, Clifton Forge, Eirporla, 
South HIM, Tappahannock, Ports- 
mouth, Gloucester, VA., also 
Pansacola. FL. 1-800-8994637. 

COMPLETELY FINISHED HOMES 
built on your lot. No money down. 
Builder participalion with closing 
costs. Thirty plans to clioosa from. 
Tan-year H.O.W. Warranty. Single- 
digit financing rates. Call AMERI- 
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1 /800-468-73 1 0, or Fredericksburg 
1/800-466-7320. 

Fast Cashi SI ,00010 6350,000 high 
riak landers, no appiksallon fae, no 
b«d«redit. Call tolllree 24 bours 1- 
800-882-7744. $1.85 per mlnuKs 
avaraga call 2 minutes. Krammars, 
P.O. Box 268 Fort Lee, NJ 07024, 
201-944-1546. 

OVmgER OPERATORS. Inway Is 
now leasing 1982 or newer tractors 
to pull either van or flatbads. Per- 
centage pay. Musi have one year 
OTR. Call 1-800-326-6929. 

3-BLDQ LOTS: 7-17 acres perkwl, 
brick horn* *7 acres; hardwood 
(looft, plastarad, 30 min. Rka Alr- 



Insuranc* Salas Dream -SOk to 75k 
your firsi year In health IrMuranc* 
business. Leads lurnishad Dy com- 
pany. Paid weekly, nochaige backs, 
fetiremenL stock, trips, manage- 
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James UPradd. 1-800-377-6146. 

BUSINESS FOR SALE Established 
since 1929. Finenwns clothing and 
iadia* sporltwoar stor* on Main 
Strad Indowntown MarkNi, Virginia. 
Large inoome potential. 703-783- 
7588 or 703-783-2344. 

DEALERSHIP LOG HOMES - 
America's finest Log Home manu- 
facturer needs quality wholesaler*. 
Earn excellent profits. Full or part- 
time. Lifetime warranty Call Mr. 
Jones fot free dealer Info. 1 -800- 
32l-'9B47 Okf Timer Log Homes, 
ML Julie), TN. 

STORE FIXTURES -in stock. New/ 
us*d. Bought. soM, Iradad. Skilwali, 
showcas**, garment racks, hang- 
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hardwv*, janMlry suppii**, manl- 
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800/937-2232. 

Become A Real Estate Appraiser. 
$100,000 potenlial. Home study ot 
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deslgnatton thtough natk>nal col- 
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home study. The finest paralegal 
program available. Free catatogue. 
800-362-7070 Depl. LH738. 

Nannlea. Spend a year or mora aa 
a Nanny with a fin* family In Naw 
Jersey. Salary$175 $400 per week 
depending on experience. 1-800- 
762-1762. 

TRUCK DRIVERS -1 yr. e»p. -up 
to 28(/ml. to start. Choose van or 
flat. Tuitlon-lree training fot those 
w/no exp. Great benatits. CaH Poole 
Truck Line 1-800-553-0443. Depl. 
Y-69. 

WATERFRONTLOTSON CHESA- 
PEAKE BAY -Hampton, VA. 
Pi«devek)ped pdcs* -$35,000 each. 
Only 9 kits avallabla. View o( th* 
bay, prhfat* beach, water 2 sides. 
604-851-2805. 

Drivers -Come lor the Money, Stay 
foritie StaHmy. J.B. Hunt, on* of 
/^marka's latgesl and most iix- 
cesslul ttaneponalton oompani**, 
pays its drivers some ol Ih* b**t 
saiarias In th* busin***. Call 1- 
800-2JB-HUNT today. EOE/Sub- 
ject to drug screen. 

SPA SPAS -SPAS -Relax, soothe 
atthtitis pain, 365 day vacation. 
Factory direct, save $1,000's on 
your spa. Quality $ dependability 
guaranteed. Free brochut**. Call 
205-486-7919. 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 



BUILDING/REMODELING 



LAWN MAINTENANCE 



CHELSEA CONSTRUCTION CO. 
Custom finished carpentry, interior 
trim, decks, fences, cabinets, enter- 
tainment centers. 427-9169 Gregg. 



G & T LAWN MAINTENANCE 

The ultimate in lawn care. Licensed 
& insured. 471-9616. 



CARPET SERVICE 



MOVING & HAULING 



CARPET CLEANING 

No gimmicks $17,50 pur room Spot 
treaimenl'doodonzer included 

Halk-.a/5, closels, baths, 1/2 price 

853-7994 

Pfoft'SSiOnal Steam Cleaning Serv.co 



CLEANING 



BOYD MOVING COMPANY 

Short notice, picl<-up, delivery 
service. We accept appliances, fur- 
niture and tools toward the cost of 
move. Call David at 855-2792. 

CHESSON TRANSFER 

Home & office movingi Insured. 
Reasonable rates, 545-1793. 



MOM'S CLEANING 

Houses, empty houses, office 
cleaning & apartments. Reasonable 
rates. Weekly, bi-weekly & monthly. 
Call 464-2639. Leave msg. 

MAKE YOUR HOUSE SPARKLE 

Kelly's Cleaning Servce. Located 
near ODU. 489-2746. 

HUSBANDS ONLYII 
If mom's happy, everyone's happy, 
right? Treat her to a sparkling clean 
home. Reasonable rates, 
dependable, references. Call 483- 
3534. 



PAINTING & DECORATING 



COLOR PRIDE PAINTING CO. 

421-7007 

Before you make that final dedsion, 

let our customers speak to you by 

our reference list. Free estimates. 

Ray'a Painting 
Free Estlmatea 

Quality work, interior, exterior, 
reskfential & commercial. Call day or 
night 853-3531. 



PLUMBING 



GENERAL REPAIRS 



F & D SMALL & LARGE JOBS 

Drywalls, finishing, painting, mason- 
ry repairs, roofs. Specialize in 
decks. Remodeling of all types. Call 
464-2639. Ask for Dale. Leave msg 
on machine. 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



24 HOUR PLUMBING SERVICE. 
SERVING ALL PARTS OF VA. 
BEACH. 7 DAYS A WEEK. Water 
heaters replaced. Leaks repaired. 
Gas tines and drain cleaning. 
Remodeling and new house 
plumbing. Many years of 
experience. Jim Maybee, state 
registered Master Plumber. 340- 
0492 anytimel (Va. Beach only) 



CLEANMG SERVICE (MU 

BIVIRONMENTALLY SAFE 

PRODUCTS USED 

ReskJential/commercial/move-ins, 
outs/one time. Senbr cttizen/milHary 
discounts. A-O Kay bonded clean- 
ing servce. 430-4405. 

KHTS FLOOR SERVICE 

Oak itoon installed, sanding & 

finishing. All types of home 

Improvements. 55 years exp. 488- 

6985. 



PROF-SERVICES 



RESUMES 

Fast, professional service. Job 
search assistance. Alpha 
Intemational, 490-7817. 



TREE SERVICE 



ACTION TREE SERVICE 

Since 1965. Complete service. 
Lteensed. Insured. Free estimates. 
Firewood. Tim Tayksr. 399-6588. 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 8. 1992 9 



^m* 



CLASSIFIEDS 




Call Sharon today to place 
your ad in the classifieds. 

547-457 1 




CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PIRSONAL 
RATES 

Itime 
2 times 
4 times 



20 Words 
or IMS 

$ 7.50 
$ 13.50 
$ 22.50 



Addttional 
words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your personal Classified Adiour times for only $22.50. You 
can cancel your ad at any time. 

All ClaMlf»d Adi run In three newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additional charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 
























*-■■ 












- 




20 words 



Run my personal ad for . 
Payment Is enclosed $ . 



Issues. 



Make eheek payable to Byerly Publlcatloro 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name 

Address 

City ^ 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 

PERSONAL AOS mutt b* piKitd by pri- 
VII* liKlhldudi. Commtrclal wid buil- 
ntu ftliMd idi do not quiDy lor 2-tlmi 
UHj 4.|lmi pwional r«tM. 



COMBINATION RATEiRunlhliufTwpertonal Id Ininy 
olhtr Bytrly Pubtcilloni newspaper lor an addilionti $3 
on* Urn*, S8 two tlrn*i, $7 lour ilmes. Newspap*ra In 
Franklin, Emporia, Lawrenc«vill*, Dinwiddle and Pa»it- 
bu^. Gal $47-4571lor dtlaili. 



ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES 



BUS. OPPORTUNITIES 



WANTED JAPANESE SWORDS- 
Art, armour & ralttsd itams. Ad- 
vanced coliactor. Highsst prices 
paid. Fr— appraisals. 424-5563. 

ANTIQUES WANTED-Guns, 
swords, books, oyster cans, 
advertlsir^), maps, oil paintings. 
491-6723. 

TELEPHONE 

Solid dak, ganaral stora watl-typa 
crank phona. Original fixturas. $300. 
Call 853-2096. 

10.000 SO. FT. FURNITURE- 
GLASS-CLOCKS-DOLLS-MUCH 
MUCH MORE. OPEN 7 DAYS, 10- 
5, 1604 QRANBY ST. 622-0905. 



SERVPRO Cleaning & Restoration 
Franchise. 34 K Completel Join the 
best team. Call 800-B26-9586. 

GRAFTERS WANTED-For a new 
store opening July 15 in Virginia 
Beach. For more information call 
463-5899. 



BUS. PROP/RENT 



CAMPOSTELLA-Contractor special, 
office warehouse. 1 ,000 & 2,000 sq. 
ft. units. 481-41 11. 



BUS. PROP/SALE 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



CLASSIC CARS -543-4260 

We bulM any dream car for you. 
Great appreciation & R.O.I. Let's 
talkl Mobile Maintenance. 

•91 GEO STORM-No credit check, 
down payment & assume payments. 
Call 498-2121. 

CAMARO PARTS-1979-Hood 
scoop for Z28, $40; left & right 
doors, $75 each; rear window 
k)uvor, $40; left & right tail lights, 
$25 each. R»iiator for 350 engine, 
$60. All in excellent condltton. Call 
Don at 486-1348. 

SEIZED VEHICLES BY DEA, FBI 
and U.S. CUSTOMS. Low as $100. 
CADILLACS, GM, BMS's, 
MERCEDES, PORCHES, FORDS. 
CALL 1-315-733-8512 Ext. R-486. 



COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS In 
downtown Portsmouth and 
Churchland. Call 399-8390, 484- 
1275 or 399-3298. Owner/Agent. 

SOUNDFRONT HATTERAS 
ISLAND, open under present 
ownership. 14 unit motel or family 
arcade & ice cream partot, lease/op- 
tion or owner financing. 919-987- 
2427. 

URRY'S COOKIES 

at Wateralde Shopping Center. 
Priced for quick sale, only $35,000. 
Call 627-7278 for info. 



To place your ad in 

the classifieds, call 

Sharon todayl 

547-4571 



Coming 

In 

September 

A special edition 
saluting the 1992 

Virginia Beach 
Neptune Festival. 

For more information, contact 

Gloria Rodgers at 

547-4571. 

or fax your ad copy to 

548-0390. 



BUS. PROP/SALE 



*Auto Repair, Beach $$ Maker 

• Paint & Body Shop - Woni LastI 

• Hot Dog Shop, $4,500 Gets You 

In. 

KENNY 490-3505 

MBB, Inc. 



CHILD CARE 



CHILDCARE-SHERWOOD 
FOREST/COLEMAN PUCE area. 
Days/nights. Weekends and drop- 
Ins. Call 855-2605. 

DOUGLAS PARK AREA 

Child care in my home. Ex- 
perienced head teacher in day care. 
Preschool chlMren accepted. USDA 
meals. 397-8973. 

CHILD CARE/NANIES-Famlly 
homes. Exp'd. Own car. Salary 
$5.00 to $6.00/hr. NO FEE. Call 
467-1644. 

KEMPSVILLE-RssponsibIs mom. 
USDA. Non-smoker. Full-tima, $60 
week. Part-time, hourly. 474-2485. 

HOME CHILD CARE PROVIDER 
STRIVING TO HELP THE 
WORKING PARENT 
Academic programs for all ages 2 1/ 
2 to school age, Ciriculum-Primary 
through school ages usss ABEKA. 
The hours are: 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. 545- 
8163. 

CHESAPEAKE 
BABYSrr-NON-SMOKING CHRIS- 
TIAN HOME. Full/part-time. Drop- 
ins wek»me. Fenced In yard with 
swingset. Snacks provided. 
Reasonable rates. 545-3800. 



CLOTHING 



WEDDING GOWN-WhIta, full- 
length, short sleeves, satin w/ 
beaded sequins. $300 or bast offer. 
Call 471-3810. 



COMPUTER/EQUIPMENT 



LOOKING FOR A COMPUTER? 
Call us for the best prices on IBM 
compatibles. This month's special 
386-33 DX $1,349. COMPUTER 
BUSINESS SERVICE. 481-7586. 

COMPUTER-UPGRADES 386-40, 
$290. RAM $39.00 PER MEG, oom- 

Elete 386-40 DX System. $1,500-4 
IB RAM. 120 MEG HD, High RES 
SVGA. Warranty. 424-0656. 



FLEA MARKETS 



MARY'S FLEA MARKET-Rent a 

table at Mary's Flea Market. Extra 
large tables. 983 Lynnhaven Pkwy., 
Lynnhaven Plaza. 468-2519. First 
10 customers receive a free tottery 
ticket. 



HELP WANTED 



MARKETING/OPINION 
RESEARCH firm seeks partcipants 
for short discussion groups to share 
likes and dislikes about various 
products and services. Such 
research helps business and 
government leaders respond to the 
public's needs. If interested, Call 
Harriet. INFOCUS Group Servtees, 
490-1351. 

POSITIONS STILL AVAIUBLE to 
type names and addresses from 
home. $500.00 per 1000. Call 1- 
900-896-1866 ($1.49 min./18 yrs.+) 
or write: PASSE • Z3829, 161 S. 
LIncolnway, N. Aurora, IL 60542. 

MAJOR CORPORATK)N Expand- 
ing/seeking professionals with sales 
management or teaching 
experience. Training & support. Call 
491-3640. 

Federal government is hiring, from 
$16,000 to $62,000 per year. Arriaz- 
ing 24 hr. recorded message 
reveals details. 804-925-1044, ext 
185, including Sundays. 

1 X 2 DISPLAY SPENCE 

JOB SEEKERS-Construction 
workers needed. Ail phases. 1-800- 
330-9335. No fee. IRC, Inc. 

AUTO SALES PEOPLE 
THERE IS ANOTHER UFEI 

You can have more freedom, much 
higher commission & real growth 
opportunity. All this & more selling a 
product that is easier to sell at less 
than 1/2 the prk;e of a car. I know, I 
sold cars too. Call Bob Foreman 
490-2422. 



INSTTAKT CASH paid for anthpjea. 
AH ktnds. WIB come to you. 

ssa-eeas 



VENDING/LOCAL 

$2 - $5,000 per month 

possible. Buy now and 

grow rich. 

1-800-723-7800 



HELP WANTED 



SALES REPRESENTATIVE 

An authorized AT&T security sys- 
tems dealer, k)cated in Hampton. 
seeks professional, ambitious, 
career-minded individuals im- 
mediately to work southside 
territory. Opportunity to advance Into 
management and grow with young 
firm. Contact Ray Baker 625-0371. 

AiRUNECREW 
TO $10 HOUR 

Will train. 461-1 148. Jobs Plus. Job 
listing service. Only $40 fee. 

SALES REP 

Natkinal co. seeks sales REP to 

call on accounts In your area. $40 K 

to $80 K First year Comm. Potential. 

405-728-9998. 

CONSTRUCTION-HIRING ALL 
TRADES Immediately for large 
projects. Experience required. »• 
cellant salaries and benefits. Open 
Sunday through Friday 9 a.m. - 6 
p.m. (305) 929-6223 ext. 21. 



HOBBIES 



STERUNQ MEADOWS FARM 

Quality horses, priced to sell. Indoor 
and outdoor riding arena's. English 
and Western riding lessons 
available. Boarding, full-care facility. 
471-2133. 




PUNGO-3 yr. old house on U 
acres, pool * many extrasi 
$138,900.721-7865. 

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, VA-3 
bedroom ranch, 1 1/2 bath, 
enclosed porch, full cellar, central 
air, washer & dryer, 2 1/2 acres, 
workshop, 2 car garage, 2 out- 
bulkJIngs, above ground swimming 
pool, small orchard & garden. Taxes 
about $300. $98,500. 804-736- 
8012. ■ > H .. - 

FAIRFIELD-Condo. $64,500. Great 
buy. 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 
fireplace. Call 496-1104 weekdays. 
496-2772 weekends. 



INSTRUCTION 



BARTENDING 

A NEW CAREER 

Intematkjnal bartending Institute 

Call 497-6700 for more info. 



MISC. FOR SALE 



SUMMERS ONE DAY SPECIAL 
Designer perfume/cologne paralels, 
$17.50 each. 3.3 ounces. Pembroke 
Mall-Sunday-One day, all day. Red 
for men. Obsession for men, Eter- 
nity for men and the list goes on. 
Eariy bird discounts. NEAR CHICK- 
FILET. 

KILLS FLEASi 

Buy ENFORCER Flea Killers for 
pets, home & yard. Guaranteed 
effecth/el Buy ENFORCER at Rob- 
bies Home Center, 3410 High St., 
Portsmouth, VA. 

BRITISH ISLES RECIPES-Comlsh 
Pasties, Devonshire Splits. 18 more, 
send $5.50 to Susan Pratt, P.O. box 
15356, Chesapeake. VA 23328- 
5356. 

COUNTRY CURTAINS, 18 CUBIC 
foot refrigerator, washer & dryer, 
Down sofa, antique table, chairs & 
glassware, patio furniture. Call 569- 
0630. 

MINOLTA-FEEDER, 20 BIN 
SORTER & STAND 

3 years okJ. Very low useage. Just 
servk:ed. Will deliver. Negotiable. 
495-3237. 



Best Fate 



NORFOLK 
TO 

Round Trip TOKYO 

JAPAN TRAVEL SERVICE. INa 

1-800-822-3336 



RRTimi 

Looking for a job that ^>praoitfe< you 
tor your hard work a k)ya^? 
Let EBA riiow you ttie way. 

• JabSecui% 

• PaUVaeaten 

• Super Bonus l> Incentive Programs 

• Advanoemerrt OpportunWei From 
Within 

Immectate openings ai* aval^le for 
indlvkkMb posiMHng good 
oommuryctfon tUta with lull raining 

If intafeeled cd Mrs. WMoughby. 

49S-S701 



Tarot Raadlngs • AaWology • Look Into Your Futun 
1-900-454-1444 $1.^ per minute 

1-800-955-5580 JnfoJC.C. 

Wlmiwlnd,kner f» 



MISC. FOR SALE 



HAPPY JACK FLEA GARD: All met- 
al patented device controls fleas in 
the home without PESTICIDES or 
EXTERMINATORS. Results 
overnight. INDUSTRIAL HDWE & 
SPLY 543-2232. 



MOBILE HOMES 



FLEETWOOD-'87 14 x 70. Have 
16% down to refinance? 3 bedroom, 
2 bath, like new, many extras. Will 
negotiate moving home, $12,500. 
Call 934-8474. 



OUT OF TOWN 



APPOMATOX-20 acre horse farm; 4 
bedroom. Cape Cod, full basement. 
Nice barn, cross fenced, next to 
state forest. $137,500. 1-846-8256. 

APPOMATOX-26 acres, 1,600 ft. 
river frontage. Huge trees, high 
bluffs, 10 acres open. $41,000. 
Owner financing with $4,000 down. 
1-846-8256. 



PERSONALS 



ADOPTION 
We can give kyour baby a k)vlng 
home, and can helpl Let's discuss 
"Caring Adoptton . . . Tom/Lorralna 
(301) 897-9528 Collect. 

SURROGATE MOTHERS 
WANTED-Fae plus expenses for 
carrying a couple's child. Must be 
18-35 and prevk)usly had a child. 
Steve Litz, Atty. (317) 996-2000. 

A LOVING CHILDLESS COUPLE 
wishes to give your baby a happy, 
opportunity-filled future. Can pay 
legal and medical expenses. Please 
call Molly and Peter collect, (703) 
256-5492. 

ADOPTION-Happy, dependable 
ooi^le, loves children and wants to 
adopt a caucaston baby. We are a 
family doctor and spouse, capable 
of providing a secure, loving home. 
Willing to pay legal & medical 
expenses. Call Haniet & David toll- 
free at home 1-800-484-7622 
■Security Code 4428." 

ADOPTION: Give your baby full- 
time parenting, a happy opportunity- 
filled future, and a large loving ex- 
tended family. Let's help each othsr. 
Call Julie/Stan collect 703-503- 
9434. 

ADOPTION: OUR ADOPTED 
DAUGHTER wants a brother/sister 
and we want to finish our family. 
Can pay legal/medk:al. Call Lynn or 
Steve collect 703-425-6932. 

Couple with tots of love seeks new- 
born to share secure home and 
happiness. Will help with expenses. 
Ivy and Dennis 703-391-9517 
(Collect). 

YOUNG "31" HAPPILY MARRIED 
couple, unable to have a baby 
desires to share their tove with a 
white infant. Will provide warmth & 
security in a beautiful home. Can 
help with legal and medical 
expenses. Please call collect even- 
ings or weekends at (703) 444- 
4943. 

ADOPTION-YOUNG CHILDLESS 
COUPLE wishes to give a baby a 
happy and secure future. Lots of 
love from a full-time mom and 
devoted dad. Legat/medical paid. 
Call collect Cheryl and Chris 703- 
817-9884. 

ADOPTION 
Loving couple wishes to adopt baby. 
Legal and medical expenses paid. 
Please call GInny and Bill collect a! 
703-241-8165. 

ADOPTION: OUR ADOPTED 
DAUGHTER wants a brother/sister 
and we want to finish our family. 
Can pay legal/medical. Call Lynn or 
Steve collect 703-408-3701. 



BondPd - J & L - Insured 

CARPET CLEANERS 



PHONE: 491-9198 



^' 



^* 



Lujotrimis 
Apartments & Tonmfumses 

fitness Center. 

yiar round Spa & Sauna, 

Tennis Courts 

& Tuttiry Qrun 

Open (Daify 9-6; Sun 116 

On Providoice R(Md 2 Ml. 



W. of Militvy tft^way 

424-7867 



tfin 



PETS 



AQUARIUM SET UPS-2 complete. 
55 gal. $200; 30 gal. $90. Diatom 
filter, needs few small parls $30. 
340-1301. 

AKITA PUPPIES 
Gorgeous coloring & show quality. 
1st shots, vet checked. Starting at 
$750. Must see to appreciate. If no 
answer, please leave message, 
473-8364. 

COCK-A-TOO - White 2 1/2 yr. old 
male. Cage/perch. Needs lots of 
attentton. Call 471-9627. 



REAL ESTATE 



VA. BEACH-Furnished 3 bedroom, 
Chesapeake Bay. Summer weekly 
rental. 467-3304/481-6513. 

BAYVIEW-Furnlshed or 
unfurnished, utilities Included, 
phone. $65 per week. 588-2855. 

CHOWAN RIVER-NC. Restaurant 
with oyster bar, (2,680 sq. ft.), 2 
story, 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath 
residential, 1,800 sq. ft. A 13 slip 
boat house. 30 space campground, 
beach & gas pier situated on 7 1/2 
acres. $420,000. 919-358-3901. 

FOR $46,500 YOU CAN OWN A 2 
BR, 1 BA In Freen Run w/brand new 
carpet. 3 pattos and all appliances. 
471-7704. 



RENTALS 



NORFOLK ft PORTSMOUTH 

NICE ft CLEAN. FREE 

telephone & basic cable. Washer ft 

dryer. Utilities included & fully 

furnished. Only $75 wk. 623-5489. 



ROOMMATES 



CHURCHLAND 

Female with same. Near 1-664. 
Great area, 3 bedroom house, air, 
large yard, $250. 483-0933/393- 
8481. 

ROOMMATE-To share house rent. 
$390 plus utilities. Male/female. 3 
bedroom, spactous yard. No pets. 
No kids. Digital pager 552-1359. 



RV'S 



CAMPER-'92 VACATION AIR 

Must sell due to sidtness. 30', front 
kit., air, awning, full bath, large 
bedroom/queen bed. Must seal 
Priced to sell. 491-7669. 



TRAVEL 



DISCOUNT CRUISES-Save 10 - 
50%. Call for dates & ships. 3 & 4 
nite Bahamas. 7 nite Caribbean. 
DEERWOOD TRAVEL. Lie. & 
Bonded. 1-800-444-0044. 



WATERFRONT 



LAKE GASTON. NC 

WATERFRONT HOMES & LOTS 

CALL FOR INF0RMATK5N. 7 

DAYS. 

SUN SET REALTY 

1-800-333-3297. 



WrTNESSES WANTED 



ANY WITNESSES THAT HAD OT 
ARE having claims problems with 
Allstate/Sears. Call 423-6239. 



1991 Small Business 
of the Year! 



S (It cess 



• 825 Pranchisci 
• 24 Yean Experience 

• RestoratkHi and 
Cleaning Service Management 

•Complete Training, 
Inventory and Support 
• $34,500 w/$15K Down 

by Prospectus Only 



i-sdo s:(. <)5S(. 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



MAKE 

MONEY 

FAST! 



$ 
$ 

$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



This exciting oppor- ^ 
tunity may be Just for g 
$ you. $ 

Your organization ^ 
can earn extra nnmey ^ 
fast and easy soliciting ^ 
subscriptions to your g 
local community news- 1| 
$ paper. ^ 

For more Informa-^ 
tion, call 547-4571 and ^ 
g asktospraktoramecNie^ 
about CAMPAIGN 50. g 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



10 Vinonia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 8. 1992 

Council OK*s 
$300,000 for 
science museum 

By LEE CAHIL 

Virginia Beach Sun City Council Reporter 

An expansion of the Virginia 
Marine Science Museum, which 
would cost approximately $38 mil- 
lion over a projected four-year con- 
struction period, should make it one 
of the finest museums in the coun- 
try, according to Mac Rawls, the 
museum's director. 

City Council, which has consis- 
tently supported the museum - the 
museum opened in 1986 - contin- 
ued that support last week when it 
appropriated $300,000 in additional 
funds to apply toward the $800,000 
needed for the next architectural de- 
sign phase for the addition. 

The money became available 
from the Rudee Inlet dredging pro- 
ject. City Manager James K. Spore 
reported that the Department of the 
Army has agreed to accelerate the 
project with additional Federal 
funding so that the local money 
will not be needed. 

Council took action last week 
after hearing a report from Eco- 
nomic Research Associates on the 
economic feasibility of the project. 

In 1992 dollars, the cost of the 
expansion, which will triple the 
size of the museum, is $31.3 mil- 
lion. The higher figure takes infla- 
tion into account 

The building space will be in- 
creased from 41,500 to 120,500 
square feet and the site will be in- 
creased from nine acres to 45 acres 
and include nature trails and outside 
exhibits. 

The aquarium volume will be in- 
creased from 100,000 to 1,000,000 
gallons and include sea turtle, river 
otter, shark and marine mammal 
tanks; an IMAX Theater (the hi- 
tech, large screen theater that makes 
the audience feel as though it is 
taking part in the show) and 
restaurant services will be added; 
areas for temporary exhibits and gift 
shop will be expanded, and parking 
will be increased from 175 to 454 
spaces. 

Architects for the project are E. 
Verne Johnson and Associates of 
Boston. If the current schedule is 
followed the expanded museum 
should be open to the public on 
May 1, 1996. 

One component of the plan is a 
deep ocean building which will, in- 
clude a 400,000-gallon shark tank 
with a floor-to-ceiling viewing area, 
and a large dolphin tank. 

Economic Research Associates 
(ERA) estimates that the attendance 
at the expanded museum will be 
twice as high (about 800,000) as 
the current attendance. 

The fee schedule sys- 
tem will be changed, said Rawls, 
to $6 each for the museum and 
IMAX or $9 for a combination 
ticket for adults and lesser fees for 
children and senior citizens. The 
current charges are $4.25 for adults, 
$3.25 for children, no charge for 
children under four and $3.85 for 
senior citizens. 

ERA found that the approxi- 
mately two-thirds of the museum 
visitors are overnight guests at the 
Beach and the remainder is made iq) 
of local and day-trip visitors. 

In its visitors survey, ERA found 
that 54 percent of the visitors 
would return to the Beach because 
of the museum and 95 percent ex- 
tended their stay at the Beach to 
visit the museum. 

Figures in the ERA report as- 
sume that the city will cMitinue to 
contribute about 21 percent of the 
Museum's operating budget befwe 
debt sa\«x which would amount of 
$I'.06 million in 1996. The city 
also makes debt service payments 
of approximately $460,999 a year 
in connection with the existing 
museum. 

The city will benefit from the 
museum in increased employment 
during and after construction, in- 
creased revenues both from the at- 
tendance at the museum and longer 
stays at local hotels and motels, and 
rom what can be a nationally rec- 
(^nizedasseL 

Budget Director Dean Block saki 
that the museum expansion would 
represent a significant economic 
benefit for the city. 



BY ORDER OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



l\^RDD needs 
some volunteers 

Moital RetirdatitMVDevelopmoi- 
tal Disabilities of Virginia Beach 
are seeking adult volunteen willing 
to give a few hours per week to as- 
nA adulu or children who have de- 
vdopamntal disabilities. 

Hcwrs are flexible. Contact 
Sheib Bogart at 473-5223 for more 
infomytfkm. * 



OSES 



DISCOUNT STORE 



Sale Continues 

UNTIL EVERYTHING 

IS SOLD TO THE 

BARE WALLS! 



fS^^ 



STOREWIDE 
SAVINGS!! 

TVS, STEREOS, VCRS, CAMCORDERS, 
MICROWAVES. SMALL APPLIANCES, 
PHONES, CLOTHING FOR THE ENTIRE 
FAMILY, HOUSEWARES, DOMESTICS, 
HOME FURNISHINGS, WATCHES & 
JEWELRY, TOYS, SPORTING GOODS, 
HARDWARE, GARDEN & PATIO 
SUPPLIES, AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES 
ftLOTSMOREI 



BRAND NAME 
MERCHANDISE!! 

MAGNAVOX, GE, SAMSUNG, RCA, 
GOLDSTAR, EMERSON, JENSEN, 
WEST BEND, MR. COFFEE, BLACK & 
DECKER, HANES, LEE, SOUTHERN 
CLASSICS, DUNDEE, 
RUBBERMAID, NINTENDO, GAME 
BOY, MURRAY & SUNBEAM TO 
NAME JUST A FEW! 
MANUFACTURER'S WARRANTIES 
VALID ON ALL APPLICABLE ITEMS!] 



EVERY PRICE 

CUT 25% 

Evary Itam In tlocfc will b* diacountsd 25% 

at the ragistara, cvwi thOM alraady martod downl 

Quantttlaa llmltod to alock on hand. 

No ratums, axchangaa. ralnchacks, mfr. coupons, 

Sr. CItlzan discounts or Rosas Sals Pttes 

Guarantaa. Sorry, no paraonal chadcs. 

ALL SALES FINAL! 

Tha Shoa Dapsitnisnt Is NOT going out of 
business but IS parUclpatIng In this sals. 




SHOP REGULAR STORE HOURS ... HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION! 



ONLY AT THESE SELECTED STORES 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

Arrowhead Plaza Shopping Center 
5612 Princess Anne (toad 

IT'S BUSINESS-AS-USUAL AT OTHER ROSES DISCOUNT STORES 



SALE CONDUCTED BY NASSI-BERNSTEIN COMPANY INC. AS AGENT 




orca^ 
only! 



July 1992 




Ellen Tunnlcliff, Realtor; Woody Oakley, Realtor; Randy Cash, Realtor; Herbert L. Farrar, Owner-Realtor 

FARRAR AUCTION & REALTY located in South Hill, Virginia 

wants to put you in your vacation home or the home of your dreams! 

Farrar Auction & Realty is witti you before, during and after tiie sale. 



A PVgRTIgER IND E X 



Advertiser Eaee 

Distribution IMap (Pull-thru Section) ...p. 2 

Mary Sherwood Interior Designs Littleton, NC.p. 3 
T&T Sales, Inc. Freeman, Va....p. 3 

Farrar Auction & Realty, Inc. South Hill, Va....p. 4 

Moncure Mobile Homes Roanoke Rapids, NC.p. 4 

& South Hill, Va. 
Camp-Barnes, Inc. Franklin, Va....p. 5 

Wayne E. Wilson Emporia, Va....p. 5 



Advertiser Eass. 

Century 21 Clary & Associates, Inc. 

Emporia, Va....p. 6 & 7 
Cannon Realty Co. Inc. Bracey, Va....p. 8 

First Virginia Bank South Hill, Va....p. 10 

& Bracey, Va. 
Pollard ERA Pro Realty Chesterfield, Va....p. 10 

Distribution Map (Pull-thru Section) ...p. 11 

Essex Savings Bank Emporia, Va....p. 12 



2 July 1992. Southside Vintinia Realtty 

Petersburg 




Published Monthly as part of the: 



•Dinwiddle Monitor 

►The Tidewater News (Franklin) 

►Brunswick Times-Gazette 

►Independent Messenger (Emporia) 

►The Chesapeake Post 

►The Virginia Beach Sun 

►The Portsmouth Times 

►The Petersburg Monitor 

►Also distributed Free at 

selected area locations. 



Ce. 



#r 



• Clly 



Col. 



• » 



Cft 



cmgCo. 



Co. 



I Co. 



HomkiCo.^ 



M» 



BiillonI 



«Ca 



Co. 



Win Co. 



Nofton Ctty 



Ce. 



TaanlCe. 



Saqitti Ca 



Hortgonwy Co. | SdmCly 

an 



PUMdCo. 



FnMnCk 



WHaCo. 



Fton^Ca 






Co. 



CmlCo. 



ar 



BiMlBlC*y 



GfifMii Co. 



MIcIiCol 



Hwnrco. 




July 1991 Southside VinrinM Realinr. 3 



/HARy SliCI?>V€CD 

INTENCIP DESISNS 



1 



\Qy 



UMlCt 



(l/l<in<L<ly 



DESIGN CONSULTATION 

* NEW CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATIONS 

^ CONTEMPORARY & TRADITIONAL DESIGN 

* KITCHEN & BATH CABINETRY 

* WALL & FLOOR COVERINGS 

* CUSTOM DRAPERIES ^ FURNITURE 

* ACCESSORIES & GIFTS 



New Locaton-Opening Soon on Lake Gaston 

Eoute $03 ■ Big Stone House Creek (Near Salmons iMnding) 

Littleton, NC 



P.O. Box 1803 ~ 537 Becker Drive, Roanoke Rapids, NC 

(919) 535-5285 



T & T SALES, INC 

Hwy. 58 - Freeman, VA 
(Greensville - Brunswick Line) 
"' Owned & Operated by Truman Bowen 



' Financing 

Plans 

Available 




We Also Do 

Moving and 

Set-Up Of Your 

Present Home. 



Specializing In Modular Homes 



Visit our lot for all your home needs. We offer a complete line of Modular Homes from Ranch Style, Split 

Levels, Cape Cods, and Two Story . 

Authorized Dealer for: 

Virginia Homes, Crestline Homes, North American Housing 

Phone: Office - (804) 634-2509/Home - (804) 949-7464 

Hours: Mon. Tues. Thurs. Fri. 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Sunday & Night Hours by Appointment ^^^- * ^^^- ^^'^^ ^•'"- " ^^-^^ ^^on „. . . n , 

^ *^^ Virginia Dealer 



4 July 1992. Southside Vintinia Realtor 



FARRAR AUCTION & REALTY, INC. 

514 E. ATLANTIC ST., SOUTH HILL, VA 23970 

(804) 447-8774 




South Hill - Older Home, 
4bdrms.,2baths, on 1 
1/2 acres, $75,900. 




Lake Gaston - On water, 
Doublewide, 3 bdrms., 2 
baths, $125,000. 

Herbert L Farrar 
Randy Caafa 




South Hill - Located near 
hospital, 4 brdrms., 2 
baths, basement, ga- 
rage, central heat & air 
conditioning, plus much 
more! $94,900. 

Lako Gaston - 

Waterfront, 3-brtirm, 2- 
bath home on a point lot. 
This lake home has a 
livinp room, large den, 
Flonda room, carport & 
pier. Call for more details. 
$175,000. 




Ellen Tuimicliff 



Lake Gaston - 

Outstanding executive 
home on prime 1.62 
acres± lot with exceptional 
view of main lake. This 
three-level contemporary 
contains 4 bedrooms, 3 
baths, great room w/ 
fireplace, utility room, large 
deck. 2-car gaiBge, boat 
house with electric lifts, 
security system & 
underground sprinkler 
system. Call today I 



Woody (^kley 
Ed Taylor 



Farms & Lots Located 
in Mecklenburg County 

Rt. 663 20 acres $20,000 

Rt. 637 22.6 acres $34,000 

Rt. 637 24.5 acres .....$37,000 

Rt. 637 26.2 acres .....$40,000 

Rt.812 30 acres ........$29,900 

Rt.637 37.1 acres $55,000 

Forest La. 55.1 acres ....$155,000 

Rt. 622 80 acres ........$75,000 

Rt.664 120 acres ......$65,000 

Rt.711 124 acres ...... $65,000 

Rt. 47 472 acres ....$225,000 

Rt.669 492 acres ....$595,000 

Lots across from South Hill 

GolfCourse 

(3.5 • 7.5 acres) 



OTfOiTUNiTy REALTOR 



BUILT BETTER FROM THE 

INSIDE OUT! 




Compare the 

construction 

in our homes 

to any 

manufactured 

or site-built 

home. 

You will find 

these same 

high-quality 

features in any 

Champion-built 

home regardless of 

square footage. . . 




CHampion 

HOME BUILDERS CO. 



1. Solid Wood studs every 16" in all exterior walls for extra strength. 

2. Sturdy 3" thick walls between most rooms. 

3. Sturdy wood floor joists every 1 6" for that extra-solid feeling. Our joists also are 

secured crosswise over steel l-l)eams for extra strength. 

4. Solid sub-floor throughout under fashionable carpeting or no-viax vinyl lino- 

leum. 

5. Proven, load-tested wood roof-rafter system for reliable structural strength 

against wind and snow loads. 

6. Fire-resistant and sound-resistant drywall interior paneling throughout in most 

models, exceeding federal fire-safety standards. Drywall also offers more 
stability-weighs 2 1/2 times more than plywood paneling. 

7. Attractive fire-resistant and sound-resistant drywall ceilings throughout. All 

without unsightly fasteners showir^. 

8. Depending on model, a pitched shingled residential roof with optional dormer, 

or a steel roof with lock -jointed leak -resistant design. 

9. Roofing undertayment between shingles and wood sub-roof for extra weather 

protection. 

10. Sturdy wood sub-roof for secure fastening of shingles. 

11. Thk;k rockwool roof insulation, plus a moisture-fighting ceiling-area vapor 
barrier. 

12. All-copper 15/20 AMP branch circuitry. Convenient circuit breakers-no fuses. 

13. Attractive aluminum-framed large windows with screens and optional storms. 

14. Weather-resistant exterior siding. 

15. Thick fiberglass insulation under entire floor over moisture-fighting vapor 
barrier. 

16. Ijrge heat ducts sized for adding central air conditioning. (Locations may 
vary.) 

17. hJon-corrosive water lines in insulated cavities under floor for extra weather 
protection. 

18. Thick fiberglass insulatbn in all exterior walls. 

19. Nane-tjrand full-size refrigerator, range, furnace and water heater for extra 
reliability. 

20 Fine-fumilwe cattnets of superior exterior and interior design featuring spring- 
hinged doors and easy-glide drawers. 



MONCURE MOBILE HOMES 

1409 E. 10**^ St., Roanoke Rapids, NC • (919) 537-2765 
119 W. Danville St., South Hill, VA • (804) 447-8889 



July 1992. Southside Virginia Realtor 5 



Planning Your Dream Home? 



Two Public \ 
Schools - 
One Private 
School 





County real estate taxes 
.53 per $100 



Retire Here! 



50 minutes to Newport News/Norfolk/Virginia Beach 

"Darden Mill Estates" 

Lakefront Properties 
& 

''Swan Estates" 

Hunterdale area adjacent to Franklin City limits 

Southampton County Properties 
await the careful plans you have made for your future. 



For Sale By: 



Camp-Barnes, Inc. (Owners/Land Developers) 403 1/2 N. Main Street 
Franklin, VA 23851 (804) 569-8286 weekday (804) 562-4502 nights & weekends 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS: INTERIOR and EXTERIOR 

Yfe Do It All - No Job Too StnalU 

•PAINTING 

(Interior & exterior) 

REMODELING • WALLPAPERING & REMOVAL 
• ROOFING • PRESSURE WASHING • ADDITIONS 

• CARPENTRY 

Your Home Deserves The Best! 




Wayne E. Wilson 

General Contracting and Repair 

804-535-8100 

(call collect) 




6 July 1992. Southside Virginia Realtor 



CENTURY 21 CLARY A 




Emporia: Ideal home for large family, 4 bed- 
rooms, la^e waIMn closets, aluminum sid- 
ing. Only $42,900! Ask for Rita. 



CtiMnsvlHt County: See today, three bed- 
room plus study room. Big family room, big 
garage for work shop or snnall business. Rve 
minutes from Emporia. Great Buy!!! $^,900. 
Call Mk:. 




Emporia: Value packed home in Wal nut Height 
in Emporia. 3 BR, 2 tile baths, HW floors, 
carport, wooded back yard. Assumption 
available- $71,600. Call Robin. 



Emporia: Like new home built in 1991. 3 BR, 
2 baths, master bath has a Jacuzzi, separate 
shower and walk-in closet Huge kitchen, 
fireplace and deck. Call Robin. 




Brunswick County: Country Home on 7.25 
acres with pond and timber. Contains 
approximately 1563 sq. ft. of living area with 
three bedrooms and two baths. Also fully 
unfurnished basement, carport, and two 
fireplaces. $89,000. Call E.B. Matthews. 



i ' •'■ , ^ _^ ; 



Emporia: What a buy! Over 1250 square feet 
of spacious living in this 2-bedroom home 
with expandable attic. Heat pump keeps you 
cool in summer and warm in the winter! 
Garage and fenced in yard, too! $43,600. 




QiMnsvllle County: in the country! Quiet 
here for children, dogs and family. 4 bed- 
room, 2-bath home. Call Clary today at 
$64,900. 



ExqulsKeJy Styled TwoSiorj/ Tudor to serve 
the needs and desires of its happy occupants . 
Newly constructed in 1986 with the best of 
everything and ene^ efficient to the penny! 
Has an additional summer kitchen on the ist 
level for easy entertaining , and a hot tub for 
relaxing. The bam, pasture and 31.4 acres 
would make it a happy home for horses , too! 
Call Jerry. 



m 

REALTOR* 



Emporia: Great Neighborhood! 3 bedrooms, 
new paint, new kitchen floor, detached ga- 
rage, excellent condition. Won't last king!!! 
Call Mk: «id start packing! $61,900. 



Emporia: VA acquired property! 3 bedrooms, 
great room with fireplace, 2 full baths, large 
lot,carportand more. REDUCED to $64,000. 
*Sokl as is'. Call Alice Mitchell. 



-.,,<HIHBi^ 




wmmtmiMlkt. 




Emporia: Mini Storage with 32 Bays. All sizes 
and all shapes. On a 0pp. 80 x 20 ft lot. 
Priced to sell at $66,000. Call Maurice, 
please. 



Emporia: Farmer Emporia Radiator and Glass 
Building fbrrfinl- Plenty of room to work or can 
be used for office space. At Just $400 a 
month you can't do better. Call ftv Maurice. 




Qreentvltle County: Ba^ain Time! Newly 
remodeled 2-bedroom home on seven acres 
in Greensville County! $44,600. Call Clary. 



Qaston: Secluded rendezvous, beauti- 
fully landscaped and built-in comfort in this 3- 
bedroom, 2-bath home. Decks, boat house 
and dock with storage. Peaceful location. Call 
Jerry fbr appointment 




JiMt taM M what yod want... 

it's as cood as dona." 
ImtHMomv OwNB urn Omiuam 



See The Following Agents: 



Jean Clary — 634«610 
JenyChaney BrendaSykes Elizabeth Robinson 

•76-2263 634-2108 634472S 



CLARY and ^ 

ASSOCIATES, INC. 



IfMHIVWIT 



320 S. Main St., Emporia, VA 
634-5151 or 1-800^9»«46S 



411 Hicks St., tawpenceville, VA 
8484151. 447-8740 or 1-80(^8994682 



Maurice EdMwds 
•346774 

Ed6oeMr«e 
636-8726 

Rita Gamer 
S4»«610 

Sam Harrison 
■3S6646 



Billy Whitmen 
6366772 

C.Pat Lucy 
•49-7606 

Alice Mitchell 
634-3408 

E.B. Matthews 
6362771 



Carl Williams 
634-2350 

Mk!Toppii« 
3466048 

Robin Whitman 
8386772 

Sharon P. Johnson 
726-9031 



Julv 1992. Southside Vinrinia Realtor 7 



WD ASSOCIATES, INC. 






Etnporta: Must See! Beautiful new home- 
quality constnicted. 4 bedrooms, 3full baths, 
large kitchen with dining area, formal living 
room and dining room combination. Large 
closets and storage area. Many extras! Make 
appointment to see today. Call Alice Mitchell. 
$121,500. 



Emporia: What a deal! 4 BR, 1 1/2 bath. Vinyl 
skiing, new electrical service. Fireplace, hard- 
wood floors, fencedyard and more! $68,600. 
Call Robin. 



Greensville County. Immaculate home in 
Greensville County. 3 BR plus playroom. Ce- 
ramic bath, new roof, new plumbing, central 
heat and air. This one won't last long! 
$49,900. Call Robin. 



Emporia: Excellent home in excellent neigh- 
borhood. Water view from kitchen, den and 
master BR. 3 BR, 2 baths. Rreplace, heat 
pump, beautiful landscaping. REDUCED TO 
$84,000. Call Robin. 





V 


i^jj^'f fSMBm 








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M^ ';^». ." 


ii 


p 




5PBIP 









Lake Qaaton: Duplex on Lake Gaston. Enjoy one floor while rentir^ out the other floor for 
investment income. $165,000. Call Jerry. 



Emporia: Super buy. 4 BR, 2 bath on 1 acre 
lot. Older but modernized home. Simply 
beautiful, in the city. Call Maurice. 



BniMwIck County: New listing, 3 bedroom, 
brick rancher, 1,600 ->- Sq. ft. on 25 acres ±, 
nice pond. Convenient to Hwy. 46 and 1^. 
$85,500. Call Pat Lucy. 




Lawrencevllle: The Vintage Caf6 in downtown 
Lawrenceville. Complete^ renovated old brick 
structure with ovenwhelming charm. Cozy pub, 
elegant dining room, fully-equipped kitchen 
and entire lower levisl that can be used as 
desired. Building is appn»(imately30' x 110' 
plus large paved parking lot is included. Call 
E. B. Matthews. 



Convenient to 1-95: Perfectfor bed and break- 
fast. Elegant is the word to describe this 
lovely Victorian home. Beautifully renovated 
with over 3600 square feet of spacious living. 
5 bedrooms, 2 baths, fomial living and dining 
rooms, family room with double fireplaces. 
Call today! $105,000. 



Jarratt: Three-bedroom home in Jarratt, 
perfect for first time buyer or investor at 
$29,900. They just do not get any less 
expensive. Call San. 



BniMiswIck County: Two^tory Colonial on 
10 acres. 3 bedrooms, new heating and air 
conditioning. Insulated. $79,900. Call Sam. 



ADDITIONAL LISTINGS 



Great Investment Property on Virginia 

Avenue, Emporia. Under$20,000. Large house 
and loL Call Maurice. 

Approximately 660 acres in Brunswick County 
near Lawrenceville, Good highway frontage, 
some cropland, genUy rol ling topography and 
sandy loam topsoil. Excellent configuration, 
and approximately 400 acres of beautiful 1 4- 
year-old plantation pines. Great opportunity 
at $450,000. Call E.B. Mathews. 

26.7 acTMwith long road frontage. Someopen 
and some wooded. A great buy at only 
$20,000. Call E.B. Mathews 



Lot «69 in 4-seasons on Lake Gaston. 

Approximately .66 acrewith panoramickview. 

Hard surfaced road and central water system, 

and pricedatonly $59,000. CallE.B. Matthews. 
KerrLake. Waterfrontlotapproximately 2acres. 

Call Ed Goeking: 6364-5728. 
Tanglewood-ln tovely lot ready for you. Perfect 

for mobile homes. Erijoy golf, tennis and 

swimrnng. $5,500. Call Ed Goeking. 
Laice Gtston-Beautiful waterfront lot in 

secluded area. Boat dock already there just 

waiting for you. $41,500. 



UNO, INVESTMENTS, 
HUNTING RETREATS 

Brunawlck Lak*-3 acre lot waterfront New 
road, septic permit, elec. available. $23,900. 

87 acre Greensville County. Old Cabin, 10 
acres open land, to be reforested by owner. 
FrontageRL619. $52,»)0. 

97Bcn Lunenburg County near Kenbridge. 
1 000 ft road frontage, replanted 1 988. Rolling 
landwith pond. $50,000. 

Meharrin RIvar frontage-Lunenburg 
County. Rolling land with road frontage. 
Cutover with buffer left around river. 143 
acres. Only $57,000. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 
BILLY WHITMAN 



8 July 1992. Southside Vimiiiia Realtor 



CANNON REALTY CO. INC 



P.O. Box 161 — Brocey, Virginia 23919 
Office: (804) 636-2278 - FAX: 636-2599 






Lot 33, Mill Creek Landing — 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 
large family room with fireplace. Screened-in porch. 
Large deck. Central air & heat. Located on gentle, 
sloping WATERFDONT lot with pier & boathouse. Price: 
$189,000. 




Lot 11, Mill Creek Landing — 3 bedroom, 2 baths, 
family room w/fireplace; dining area, Fkarkia room, 
furnished. Central air & heat. Storage bidg. Located on 
gentle, sloping WATERFRONT tot with sandy shore- 
lines. Owner financingi f^rice: $145,000. 



Lot 5, Cannon's Ferry — 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, family 
room. Completely furnished. Central air & heat. 
Screened-in porch. Located on main lake with steps 
and pier. Prce: $159,500. 



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Boyd'e Mil Estate* — 12x60 mobile home, 2 bed- 
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, kitchen, family room. Concrete pad 
for parking, chain link fence, 12x20 storage building. 
WATERFRONT toton main lake with 40 ft. pier. $85,000. 



Clarksville, Va. — Ranch-style home, i.bOO sq. ft., 
cedar skiing. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room, kitchen, 
dining room, large den, utility room. 2-car garage. 
$77,000. 



River Ridge Golf & Camping Club, located on Lake Gaston, offers affordable recreational property. The lots are deeded lots. The property 
owners make their own policy. Includes such amenities as: pool, tennis, golf, park areas, boat ramp & much more. Many lots are available 
with owner financing. 





'IS ^^1 



Lot 68-F, River Ridge — 1 988 mobile home. 14x70. 3 
bedrooms, 1 1 /2 baths, largedeck, storage space under 
trailer. TV dish included. $32,500. 



Lot 136-F River RMge — 12x^ mobile home. 3 
bedrooms, 2 baths, air, fully furnished, deck with 
WATERVIEW. $31,000. 



iajiBn 



Lot 107-F River Ridge — 14x70 mobile home. 2 
bedrooms, 2 baths (1 bath has garden tub), furnished, 
air. $26,000. 




^B9HiiHIH^[^^^iH^HP^^^9Bi[^^^H 




Lot 62-B, River RMge — 18' Teny camper. 10x12 
screen-in porch, storage bkig., water & electrk:. $7,500. 



Lot 11 7-H, flhrer Ridge — 32' camper, 1 986, sleeps 6. 
air, storage bkig. Very ncel $18,500. 



Lot 109-A, River RkJge — 1971 Fan camper, electric 
heat. air. pcnc shelter, water, sewer, electric. $1 2.000. 






Lot 51-1, Rhfer RMge — 27* camper, sleeps 8, deck, 
added room, kx^ted on nee. wooded tot, water & 
elactrto. $11,500. 



IdOt 11-L, River Ridge — 21' camper, air, deck, 
improved tot with drive, water, electric. $7,500. 



Ljot 84-A, River Rklge — Camper with deck, storage 
buiMing. water & electric, nee flat, wooded tot. $6,500. 



ADDITIONAL LOTS AND PROPERTIES - MANY AVAILABLE ifinTH OWNER FINANCING 

CALL FOR A TOUR TODAY! ^ 



. 



July 1992. Southside Virginia Realtor 9 



SELLING YOUR HOME - 
SELECT THE " RIGHT AGENT " 

One of the most important decisions you will make when selling your home is selecting 
the right agent to represent/market vour property . Unfortunately, many homeowners 
select a relative, a friend, a friend of a friend, the agent who quotes the highest list price. 

When you consider yourself as the employer, the agent as the employee, and the fact that 
you are going to pay a salary (fee) of $7 ,000 to $70,000 you begin to see the significance 
of this decision. The more expensive the property - the more significant the decision! 

SELECTION GUIDELINES 

1. NUMBER OF INTERVIEWS: Interview a minimum of three different agents. 

2. SPECIALIZATION: Select the agent who has a reputation for specializing in 
property that is most similar to yours. Specialization is as important in real estate as it 
is in the medical or legal profession. 

3. ADVERTISING COMMITMENT: Insist that each agent give you a detailed 
marketing plan (in writing) that identifies all forms of advertising. This list should identify 
the size of the ads, the dates of distribution, color or black and white, picture or verbal, 
and should cover a period of not less than three months. This commitment should be an 
integral part of the listing contract. 

4. MARKETING COMMITMENT: Clarify other marketing issues such as broker's open 
house, open houses, signage, feature sheets, etc., again in writing. 

5. PRICING: Be objective in regards to pricing! Far too many sellers select the "highest 
list" price agent. Over-pricing is one of the most serious mistakes homeowners/agents 
make and usually results in extended market time and a lesser sales price in the end. 

6. REFERENCES : All agents who you interview should provide a list of references and 
phone numbers of past, and more importantly, current clients. This list will give you the 
opportunity to determine first hand actual performance. 

7. SALES HISTORY: All agents who you interview should provide a sales history to 
determine if that agent, in fact, sells property similar to your property. This list should 
include the previous year at a minimum and preferably all sales since entering the 
profession. 

8. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION: As with any profession, continued education is 
necessary to stay abreast of current trends and changes in real estate law. The agent 
should provide you with a detailed summary of his education above and beyond his license 
requirements. 



10 July 1992. Soulfagide Viiginia Realtor 



FIRST 

VIRGINIA 

BANK 



^ Commercial Lending Service 

^ Locic Boxes t^ Certificates of Deposit 

^ IRA t^ Visa ^ Mastercard 

* insured Money Marlcet Accounts 

* International Bankins Services 

^ Checkins ^ Savings 
t Senior Citizens Benefits 



"The Sign of Safety, Convenience and Service." 



Biain Office 

111 East Danville St. 

South Hill. VA 23970 

(804) 447-7141 

sSiR Member FDIC 



Town Square Shopping Center Branch 

725 East Atlantic Street 

South Hill, VA 23970 

(804) 447-7669 



Lake Gaston Branch 

Hwys. 903&751 

Bracey.VA 23919 

(804)636-7141 



M'^.^ 






'V*s 



t -J*-. 



iwioviiyc TO 

RICHIVIOMD AREA? 



Are you aware that it is normal for approximately 
8,000 residential properties to be on the market in 



Richmond and its suburbs, Chesterfield and Henrico, and that each 
locality has different tax rates and that combined they have about 140 
schools in various neighborhoods? 

I have spent the last thirteen years answering questions concerning these 
homes, schools, tax rates, etc. and am prepared to answer your questions and 
show you any of these homes at no cost to you. I moved here from Southside Vi 
ginia and know what it can be like. Call or write me for detailed information. 



1 -804-796-9800 

m 

REALTOR 



iOUU HOUSING 
OPPOUTUHITV 




Joseph W. Pollard, Jr. 
ERA PRO REALTY, INC 

P.O. Box 1 330 
Chesterfield, VA 23832 





July 1992. Southside Virginia Realtor 11 



Southside Virginia Realtor 

Reaching More Than 



000 Readers 



from Virginia Beach 
to Lake Gaston 
...Portsmouth 
to Petersburg! 




/ 



12 July 1992. Southside Virginia Realttw 



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The Virginia 



mvmb 97 /Id? 1^7 
VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY 
, iH. S CAPITAL ST 



jhmoiui 



VA 23.' 1') 



;/i 



Wednesday, July 15. 1992 




SERVING THE CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 



65th Year No. 29 2b Cents 



Portsmouth Chief 
Palmer discusses 
Chief Wall's plight 



By M.J. RICHARDS 
Virginia BMch Sun Staff Writer 

Pwtsmoudi Chief ionald Palmer 
has been following recent newspaper 
coverage of Virginia Beach Police 
Chief Charles Wall, particularly the 
reported "problems" concerning low 
morale in his dqrartment 

As a police chief with two years of 
experience and a command of 208 
officns, Pahner said being in such a 
position is, to him, a challenging one. 
"In general, being a polke chief is 
being so many 
things to so 
many people," 
said Palmer. 
"You don't 
knowwhatrole 
you'replaying; 
sometimes - 
policeman, ad- 
ministrator, 
teacher, pastor 
at times ... A 
lot of times, a 
chief can'tdoall the things that people 
expect or demand." 

Palmer said that he thinks Wall has 
handled himself well, and said he 
could say "nothing negative about 
the man. 

"I think he's a competent chief," 
said Palmer. "He's respected by his 
peers. He's been recognized nation- 
ally for his accomplishments. He's 
just running into some tough times 
right now." 

According to Palmer, in most of 
the local media, getting more nega- 
tive publicly than positive publicity 
m any polkx department seems to be 
the norm. He said thatitis news when 



"I think he's a com- 
petent chief. He's 
respected by his 

peers. He'ib been rec- 



ognized nationally 
for his accomplish- 




Palmer 



ments. He's just run- 
ning into some tough 
times right now." 

Fortamouth Falie* dilrf 
RonaldPabner 

the police department does some- 
thing bad, or when things don't go 
according to their original plan. 

"The press doesn't come in and 
say, 'chief, what's happened that's 
good today,' or ask my people what's 
happened that's good today," said 
Palmer. He said instead, reporters 
look for negative things they And 
newsworthy. 

As a result. Palmer said that a po- 
lice departmentdoes not receive posi- 
tive recognition often. For example. 
Palmer noted recent publicity regard- 
ing low morale in the Virginia Beach 
police department There are approxi- 
mately 800 officers in the Virginia 
Beach police department, four times 
more than in Portsmouth. 

Palmer said he hasn't had a morale 
problem, but he attributes that to his 
dq)artment size. 



Chief questions the 
vaiidity of surveys used 
to iiiustrate staff prok>lems 



By M.J. RICHARDS 
Vkginia Beach Sun Staff Writer 

Two surveys were recently ad- 
ministered to officers in the Vir- 
ginia Beach Police Department. 

The "results" have been used by 
The Virginian-Pilot to suiqx»t its 
call for Virginia Beach Police Chief 
Charles Wall's resignation. 

The first survey was administered 
to 489 eligible officers in the Vir- 
ginia Beach Policemen's Benevolent 
Association in May. Of those, 319, 
or 65 percent, responded. The an- 
swers to the anonymous survey, 
containing 19 questions on 
satisfaction within the department, 
were tallied and given to City 
Manager James Spore. 

The second survey, conducted by 
the Virginia Beach Police 
Sergeants' Association was dis- 
tributed to 61 sergeants, with 44 
returned. The tallied results of the 
22-question survey are dated June 
27. 

These results were presented in 
the July 5 issue of the Beacon. The 
Beacon published preview para- 
graphs to the results, stating "In the 
midst of unprecedented moral prob- 
lems, these front-line supervisors 
say they have lost faith in the 
chiefs ability to lead." 

A police spdcesperson said that 
the results of these results were not 
to be distributed to the media, but 
to Wall and Spore. The resulu were 
leaked to the Beacon. 

Wall said he questi(»is the valid- 
ity of the surveys, but he is con- 
cerned with their results. 

H don't know how it was admin- 
istered," said Wall, in an intnview 
the day after the surveys were pub- 
lished. "I know not every member 
gcx surveys ... I don't know how 
it was decided who gM (them), but 
Tm told not every member erf' the 
miion g(X copies of the survey, and 
I (k)n't know how many were filled 
out 

"I've got some concerns how it 
was constructed. Also, I don't think 
- 1 think die way it was constn^ted, 
I don't Uiink ttere was too much 
chance of me coming am too good 
(m that Sffvey," said Wall. 

Wall said that the results have 
lad bodi a personal and professonal 
impact on him. 



SURVEYS 



T>wo surveys were admin- 
istered to officers in the Vir- 
ginia Beach Police Depart- 
ment. 

The first was administered 
to 489 eligible officers in the 
Virginia Beach Policemen's 
Benevolent Association In 
May . Of those. 31 9, or 65 per- 
cent, responded. The an- 
swers to the anonynxxis sur- 
vey, containing 19 questtons 
on satisfactton within tlie de- 
partment, were tallied and 
given to City Manager James 
Spore. 

The second survey, con- 
ducted by the Vl^inia Beach 
Police Sergeants' Associa- 
tion, was distributed to 61 ser- 
geants, with 44Tetumed. The 
tallied results of the 22-c|ues- 
tion survey are dated June 27. 

The Virginia Beach Sun 
tried unsuccessfully to con- 
tact members of the assocla- 
tk)n to discuss the surveys. A 
reporter's phone calls were 
not returned. 




Pilot's brutality series 
didn't report facts - Wall 



Chief Charles Wall 

"But that's probably because my de- 
partment is so much smaller." 

Palm er said h e is not "close 
enough" to Wall's current situation 
to offer him any advice, but said Wall 
has his respect. 

Palmer will soon be leaving his 
position in Portsmouth to take on a 
new position as police chief in Tulsa, 
Okla., althoiigh a date for his depar- 
ture has not been set 

Chesapeake Police Chief Ian 
Shipley, Chesapeake Deputy Police 
Chief Richard Justice, and Norfolk 
Police Chief H.P. Henson could not 
be reached for comment. 



By M.J. RICHARDS 
Virginia Baach Sun Staff Writer 

Following is a list of 21 exam- 
ples of inaccuracies and 31 exam- 
ples of "bias or irresponsible 
reporting" as published in a "police 
brutality" series., beginning on 
April 4, by The Virginian-Pilot and 
TheLed^rStar. 

The list was compiled by Lt. 
Sandy Baum and each item was 
confirmed by Lou Thurston, a Vir- 
ginia Beach Police Department 
spokesperson. 

The list was sent to theVirginia 
Beach Beacon public editor Kerry 
Sipe within a few weeks of the se- 
ries. 

Virginia Beach Police Chief 
Chartes Wall said that the depart- 
ment presented die list to thcPilot. 

"I don't think they reported the 
facts," said Wall. "In fact, we gave 
them 54 specifics that we took to 
their public editor - eiUier mis- 
statements, quotes, out and out 
mistakes and we received no - well, 
we got an acknowledgement saying 
it was a problem in perception," 



Accomplishments of the 
Virginia Beach Police Department 

• Handling more calls for service with fewer officers. 

• Lowest crime rate in the country for a city this size. 

• Clearance rate above the national average. 

• Continually expanding community involvement with programs 
such as: 

Explorer Scouts: 

Police Athletic League; 

D.A.R.E.; 

Chaplain's Program; 

Citizen's Advisory Committees in each precinct and 

Citizen's Advisory Board, comprised oi representatives fiom the 

precinct committees reporting to the chief of police: 

Crime Solver's program rated most imxluctive in the 

world eight years running; 

National Conference of Mayors award for the mgaf. ^ ": SS^ - £ ..> "? 
livable city in die nation based on, among odier reasons, die department's 
community-oriented policing program. 

• Numerous awards to members of die department from outside 
organizations, including but not limited to. National Highway Transpor- 
tation Safety Administration, Virginians Opposing Drunk Driving, Con- 
cerned Citizens Advocating Traffic Safety and odier civic organizadon. 

• The department is accredited by die Commission of Accredidon for 
Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. 

• Standardized eye les for promotion to master police officer, sergeant 
and lieutenant have beoi implemented. 

• Involvement of peer groups in review of citizen complaints and 
internal investigations widi die ability to recommend acdon to command 
staff. 

• Implementation of a peer support program to offer diose sworn 
personnel who experience crisis an outlet to confidentially discuss their 
problem. 

• Over 1,000 applications for police officer received for die last 
scheduled training academy to begin in September 1992. 

• Placement of suggestion boxes in all precincts/bureaus for direct 
transmission to chief of police. 

• Replarly scheduled face-to-fece, forum-style meedngs between 
the chief of police and first-line supovisors and patrol offk;ers. 

• Implementation of a uniform and equipment committee comprised 
of first-line supervisors and patrol officers to evaluate possible changes in 
equipment and uniforms and to make recommendations. 

• Publication of a departmental newsletter on a bi-mondily basis. 
. • Implementation of enhanced 9-1-1. 

• Implementation of an automated fingoprint identificadon system. 

• Implementation of a mounted patrol unit, establishment of bkycle 
patrols diroughout die police department. Selective Enforcement Team 
specializing in DUI/DUID enforcement. 

• Opening of Public Affairs Office widiin die police department to 
facilitate die free flow of information between die dq)artment,' die news 
media and the general public. 

This information was cominled and submitted by the Virginia Beach 
Police Department. 



"Of course, die results dcm't lock 
real good, based on what die offi- 
cers have to say," said Wall. "I 
diink that die officers have some 
real and some perceived pr^dems." 

Councilman Louis Jones said he 
plans to wait for die city manager's 
assessment before drawing any 
conclusions to the issue of the sur- 
veys. 

"I'm more interested in the city 
manager's assessment, as far as d^ 
survey, or any other opinions," said 
Jones. "I diink the city manager has 
the best opinion of the situation. I 
think it is a personnel matter I 
think he is responsible for. and I 
certainly plan on sui^x>rting him in 
his decisions." 

AssociaticMi members SgL Nick 
Sitarski, Sgt. David Hewes and 
Master Police Offcer R.W. Madi- 
^sofi did not return phone calh to 
discuK die metho(k}logy of die 
surv^s. 



Perot organizer Michael Rau 
mixes music, wildlife, politics 



By M.J. RICHARDS 
Virginia B«Kh Sun Stiff WMter 

Mixing music, wildlife rehabili- 
tation, politics and cabinet-making 
as a career may sound like an odd 
c<mibinaUon to some, but for Cape 
Story's Mike Rau, 33. it's a way of 
life. 

"If somebody asks me what my 
profession is, I usually say I'm a 
professional generalist," said Rau. a 
bespectacled red head, who recendy 
cut off his lO-iiKh ponytail. Cur- 
rendy, however, he describes him- 
self more as a "m«lia wrsigler." 

He spends much of his time as a 
media consultant for Virginians for 
Perot, a local group s^king the 
el«;tion of Texas billionaire and 
p<xenua] independent presidential 
candidate Ross Perot in the 
November election. He designs 



Tm a workahoMc. I 
have a problem get- 
ting myself over in- 



saidWall. 

The list of inaccuracies follows. 
One was omitted by the Virginia 
Beach Sun because die first names 
of diose mentioned could not be 
confirmed, causing a question of 
identity. 

• Since 1977 police officers 
alone have not been able to plea 
bargain cases under general order 
number 15.02. The police depart- 
ment has assiped an officer to the 
courts to ensure that this is not 
taking place. The attorneys are 
frustrated that this discretion has 
been prohibited and have requested 
meetings to have this policy 
changed 

• The newspaper implies that 
department police prohibits any 
kind of blow to Uie head. This pol- 
icy applies specifically to weapons 
and an officer is often expected to 
use his hand to restrain someone 
who is resisting or fighting since 
diis is a lesser amount of force. The 
officers are at an additional disad- 
vantage since it is difficult to aim 
at moving body parts. 

• The newspaper stated in its 
first article that Chief Wall said 
diere was no problem of miscon-, 
duct. Chief Wall ha^ never denied 
that diere have been incidents of 
misconduct He has provided to re- 
porters a complete accounting of 
the 18 substantiated complaints, 
and die discipline given to each of- 
ficer. He also told reporters diat die 
names of officers are flagged when 
Uiey appear in complaints three 
times, whedier substantiated or not. 
and die officer is then sent for re- 
medial training and/or psychiatric 
evaluation. 

• Sgt David Boyd's comment 
was edited. He told reporters diat he 
would be stupid to talk widi diem 
because of dieir tendencies toward 
yellow journalism. The newspaper 

:^,ttAVeA diat Boyd, said he did not 
make Sergeant by being stupid. 

• Dr. Turner Gray whose office 
is located next to Virginia Beach 
General and who serves as Medical 
Examiner for die city stales diat he 
has never seen incidents of brutal- 
ity, and never heard his colleagues 
complain, as die papers report 

• The article detailing the 
"abuse" of Leonard Andereon states 
diat Anderson was found guilty of 
assault on a police officer and DUI; 
however die green circle next to his 
picture on a chart indicated diat he 
was exonerated of charges. 

• Reporters stated diat "it's not 
diat die job is dangerous." They 
have not reported die interviews 
diey conducted widi several officers 
who were injured during arrest situ- 
ations. They also did not investi- 
gate die specifics of officers who 
have been injured in the line of 
duty. 

• The reporters indicated diat die 
de|»rtment has relaxed hiring stan- 
dards as concerns drug use, but 
failed to report die standards that 
have been increased (psychiatric ex- 
amination, no smoking agreement 
mandated scores of 100 on academy 
tests, etc.) 

t/ The papers reported diat die 
police department holds seven 
academies a year, which is abso- 
lutely impossible. It has never had 
more dian two full academies in a 
yev. 

• The state requires 40 hours of 
in-service training every two years, 
not every year as the papers re- 
ported. 

• The polygraph does not mea- 
sure muscle tension as reported by 
die newspaper. It measures breadi- 
ing, blood pressure and galvanic 
skiniesponse. 

• The pqiers reported dial pdy- 
grafAs are conducted on one out of 
every 10 officers laa year. This is 
absolutely incorrect They are q;>- 
plying die total number of intennl 
affairs polygraphs conducted to 
number of ofHcers. More than half 



▼Olred with things. If of die internal affairs polygrai^ 

were conducted on citizens, and in 



I have free time, I 

have to find some- 

thing else to do." 



•fOMJtau, 



promotional plans and media 
strategies for d« Virginia Beach and 
Norfolk campaign, acting as a me- 
dia liaison. 
But pditics does not take iq> all 

D 8MlMHAEL,Pag«7 



10 to 20 percent of cases, second 
examinations were given on both 
officers and citizens. In spite of diis 
inaccuracy, it is also true diat evoy 
officer on die force receives a poly- 
graph before he is hired. 

• In Tuesday's article, an inset 
block listed die phone number v> 
call to reserve seating at die 
upcoming Use of Force fwum. Tlie 
news n\easc announcing diis foniro 
tpcciRed that reservations were re- 
quired, not "suggnted." The article 
also gave m incorrect phcMW num- 
ber. 



Cast of Characters 

Virginia Beach Chtef 
Charles Wall • Has been an 
officer for 34 yean and chief for 
lOi years. 

Dr. Turner Gray - Medical 
examiner and doctor whose office 
is adjacent to Virginia Beach 
Hospital. 

Jim Haner and Tom 
Holden - The Virginian-Pilot 
and The Ledger-Star staff writers 
who wrote die police brutality 
series. 

Leonard Anderson - found 
guilty of DUI and assault on a 
police officw, 

Sgt. David Boyd - accused 
by Leonard Anderson of "beating" 
him unjustly. 

Jerry Alley - Editorial page 
columnist for The Virginian Pi- 
lot and The Virginia Beach Bea- 
con. 

Dennis Hartig - former edi- 
tor for die The Virginia Beach 
Beacon, an insert to The Vir- 
ginian-Pilot and The Ledger-Star. 
Still an editor at The Virginian- 
Pilot. 



• Chief Wall has two sons, not 
one as rqxvted by die paper. 

• The newspapers deleted nine 
years of Chief Wall's law enforce- 
ment experience in a profde of his 
career. 

v' Beverly Spencer is 
iiis)quoted in the newspaper as 
.tating that she knows of no drug 
testing. She is not in a position to 
know, since the results come to 
Doctor Davis. 

• The newsp{4)er calls fa more 
Officer Friendlies. The city of Vir- 
ginia Beach has one of die largest 
community relations unit in the 
country, widi 26 ofRceta assigned. 
There Were dw same number at the 
time of die series. 

• Photograph of Nancy Paricer 
was idNitified as Reba McClanan. 

• Misdemeanants are more 
combative dun felons, die paper 
said diey are not 

• The newspaper disputes die 
police department's claim diat their 
search extended back ffve years. 
This claim was based on the state- 
ment made by Tom Holden to Lou 
Thurston wherein he stated they 
(VPLS) had gone back five years. 
We know of diree imlividuals who 
were interviewed about incidents 
Uiat occurred between 1985 to 
1987. They did not report all of 
diese incidents. 

• TTie reimnted text of Chief 
Wall's speech omitted the last 
^tement quoted firom Doctor Gar- 
rett wherein he said: "Based upon 
my own personal knowledge of 
how medical "facts" were obtained 
few diis series. I have great diffi- 
culty believing anydiing written by 
diese two audiors." (Referring to 
Holden and Haner). 

• In January reporters were 
given copies of 24 of police de- 
partment general orders which indi- 
cate how difficult die job is, and 
some of die strictest use of force 
guidelines in die country. The re- 
porters only used diose portions of 
the policies diat wcMild enhance 
dieir pre-determined views, and even 
distorted what diey used. 

• Why did reporters take the 
word of a few disgrunded officers to 
blast die polygraph, widiout talk- 
ing to a licensed examiner? The 
newspaper indicates misconduct is 
rampant and diea criticizes dw de- 
partment for trying to discipline. 
They should at least acknowledge 
diat diey only have one side of die 
swry. 

• Chief Wall told r^iorters dial 
dM polygraph test is never uaed as 
dK sole determinant for disci|dine. 
This was not printed. 

• The Internal Affairs Division 
has never received a complaint 
about an officer fiom m emergency 
room doctor amx C^ Wdl has 
been widi die depanmrat 

• Officer J.R. Jotason was in- 
ttTviewed by repofters and loid Ami 
dial Judge Cocban had no pnMem 
widi his proceduita dmiag the ar- 
rest This was not itported. 

• Reporters presmtmi a l»ased 
account (^ Leonnd Andenon's in- 
jiffies to Mr. Maurie Winner of 
Nova Techttok^ies. When die 
printed stuemma from Winner's 
interview were itKl to htm. 1^ die 



^r^mrtm^^Hmi 



'^m 



2 Vgrinialbeach Syi. Wednesday. July 15. 1992 



Editorials 



i&KW^^fmj 



Looking over the facts 

The Virginian-Pilot and The Virvima Beach Beacon, a tebldd 
insert to the Pibt, have backed off. 

Hie Be(u:on recently published a column on its editorial page, 
calling for the resignation of Virginia Beach Police Chief 
Qiarles Wall, due to repeated problems within the ctepartment 

However, the Pilot later retreated. Instead, the editorialist 
suggested that if Wall cannot resolve problems within the police 
department, then something needs to be done. 

Once again, the Pilot is confusing its job of reporting news 
with the job of Virginia Beach City Manager Jan%s Spore. 

Spore is Wall's boss, not the paper's columnist, Jerry Alley; 
and certainly not the Norfolk-based newspapers' editors or re- 
porters. 

Spore said he sees no reas(Hi for Wall to resign. Many at Gty 
Hall say that Wall has done nothing "wrong," and will remain 
at least fa- the near ftiture. 

Spore has abeady demonstrated that he does not share the 
opinions of Alley, so why should the Pilot and the Beacon 
continue to badger Wall and Spore, calling for a change in the 
police chiefs position? 

City Council members have publicly stated that they will 
leave the personnel matter in Spore's hands, and back him as is 
necessary. 

One thing that needs to be noted, is that the Norfolk newspa- 
per and its editorial stafT in Virginia Beach softened its position 
only after several things were bnrought into the lig^t. 

First, Vice Mayor William Sessoms stated in last week's 
Virginia Beach Sun, "I don't want the newspaper to run the city 
of Vir^nia Beach. I want the city manager to run the city of 
Virginia Beach." 

In the same issue. Wall stated that he was told "through the 
paptviM quite awhile ago that they were gonna get my job." 

In this same issue, 54 points of "uiaccuracy" vt^ne discovered 
by police department members in the Pilot's police brutality se- 
ries. The Virginia Beach Police Department brought these to the 
attention of Kerry Sipe. who was at the time public editor for 
the Beacon, shoitly after the series was published. According 
to sources in the Virginia Beach Police Department, Sipe 
brought this u> the Pilot editor's attention, and was swiftly 
transferred out of the Beacon office to another branch of the 
newspaper. The list was acknowledged by the Pilot as a 
"misinterpretation by the reporters," according to Wall. 

This past week, Virginia Beach Mayor Meyera Obemdorf 
called for a study on tfie reported low arrest rate in the Virginia 
Beach Police Department. It was reported in the Pilot that 
Obemdorf is concerned about the effect it had on personal 
safety. She said nothing about pinning the responsibility on 
Wall. 

After these developnwnts came to light, the most recent 
editorial appeared in the Pilot, stating W^l's resignation may 
not be necessary. 

Are the editors getting a conscience? 
Probably not. — M.J.R. 







'How do ttioy axpoct Qoro to strcngthon lh« Damocratic ilckot? H« doasn't play golf 

NEARLY aa wall aa I do!" 



Letter to the Editor 

BJ. Sessions blasts MJ. Richards' "mummy mind" mentality 



Moving up 



In 14 years, Regent University has gone from an inexpensive 
idea \a an internationally recognized learning institution due, in 
part, to founder Pat Robertson's publicity. 

While many private colleges and universities are hurting 
financially. Regent has managed to stay above ground quite 
comfortably. Now, with the $117 million donation from the 
Christian Broadcasting Network, it will be able to expand even 
more. 

Regent University's evangelical affiliation has proven to be 
controversial in Virginia Beach. However, every college, 
public or private, has some sort of philosophy or affiliation it 
stands by. For instance. Harvard University has a liberal 
outiook, Notre Dame is Catiiolic and Brigham Young stresses 
mormonism. 

As Regent continues to grow financially, it will be graduating 
hundreds and eventually thousands of students in the areas of 
law, communications, business and counseling that will stand 
by its philosophy. In 10 to 15 years, Regent students will be all 
over the world in various professions. What kind of impact will 
they make in society? — M.A.B. 



■flR 

Bu^MteOlfe 




IMS TNB n «Na«c> oun ooMx, nawMfi wu THE 



VBS DEADLINES 

News deadlines for Hie Virginia Beach Sun are: S p.in. Friday f(v the 
upcoming Wecbiesday's vssot. 

• ArtKte must be legible, inefCTably typed, dmible vgutxA on standard 
sze paper. 

• Pictures must be diaip. clear tsA ^xompuiied with ccmiptete nifOTma- 
tion. (AH persons n |rictun must be identir^d.) 

• News ouy be Ixoi^ or mailed in and should include the name and 
»iq>hone numbos of the persons submitting it 

• The Virginia Bttch Sun wdconrn and encourages lenns Cram its 
lOHiers «! lofM^s (tf genend inioest 

• All fetters most cany the ume «id address of writer. 

• Lettss *«iM be a(Mres«i to: Editw. The Virginia B»A Sun. 138 
Rosamw Roal, Suite 209. Virginia Beach. Va. 23452. 

U 



Edit(», The Virginia Beach Sun: 

I must say that I truly enjoyed MJ. Richards' col- 
umn entitled "Confessions of a hit-and-run driver" 
that appeared in the July 8 edition of The Virginia 
Beach Sun. 

Normally, colleagues who write for the same 
newspaper do not comment on the other's column; 
but I feel compelled to do so in this case., 

Richards is treading on dangerous ground when she 
talks of hitting a bird with her windshield and then 
leaving the poor creature flopping around on the 
highway for other cars to smash it to smithereens. 

Richards said in her column, "I felt ill. My mind 
was racing. I had never hit a bird before. My first 
thought came to the Virginia Beach Sun columnist 
(and reknowned seagull-hater) B J. Sessions. My next 
thought came to the tons of readers that, just a few 



months ago, wanted Sessions run out of town be- 
cause he questions the value of the life of a seagull" 

When the mummy minds get through with 
Richards, she will probably regret that she did not 
stop her car at the risk of her life and others and ad- 
minister CPR to that poor bird. 

I have no doubt that some of the more radical of the 
animal rights advocates would rather that it was 
Richards that was left on the highway instead of the 
bird. Richards deserves an A for her honesty, but I 
fear she will regret it because some of the mummy 
minds {riace the life of a bird or a toad frog over that 
of a human. Good luck MJ. 

B J. Sessions 
Chessqjeake 
July 10. 1992 




Name: Allison Theresa Ballew. 

Occupation: By day, a contract administrator for 
NASA; By night, a singer for a loud alternative band. 

Nelghborbood: Thoroughgood. 

Hometown: Virginia Beach. 

How long have you lived in Norfolk: 20 years. 

Last city you lived in before moving to Virginia 
Beach: Norfolk. 

Age: 24. 

Marital status: Single. 

Children: Nq)e. 

What you love about your job: The pec^le I work 
with at NASA and the guys I sing with in tfw band. 

What you hate about your job: It's4S minutes away 
and the guys in my band are 34- hours away (in D.C.). 

If you didn't have your current job, you would be: 
Huge, leadter-booiBd. Ing-haired alternative rock star. 

Biggest accomplishment in your Ufe: Graduating 
from Virginia Tech and being able to pour my heart out 
onto paper and meld it into a song. 

Secret to success: Listening to people, shooting for 
the "unattainable" dream. 

If you couM change one aspect of your life to make 
it better, what would it be: I'd move Washington. D.C. 
down to widiin an hour's drive of Virginia Beach. 

What most people don't know about yon is: I never 
used to be able to sing. 

Best personality trait: Love c£ people. 

Worst personality trait: Impatience, bittonly when 
I'm. driving behind a tourist - of course. I've already 
written a song about this. 

Pet peeve: When people tell me anything about a 
movie that I haven't hid a chance to sm yet 

Biggest quirk: My delicate bloid of both Stapid 
jckes and being a goof. Actually, it's tn^ - 1 only have 
two jokes. And they're both pretty stu^nd. 

If you had your life to live over again, what would 
you do dirrerently: Start telling my parents I loved 
them at a much earlier age. 

if you won the lottery, what would you do wUh the 
money: Set my parents and fiamily up for life, put some 
in the bank for me and give the majesty to churciies, 
mission organizations and hunger relief. 

Fun evening: Well, lately my "fun ev«iings" have 
entailed me cutting down the flngemails on my left hand 
so that I can l^un to play the very unpretty electric 
rythm gui^ which the guys (refer to the above "love 
about your job") have decreed necesssy for forther 
band "groovedness.". 

FiiD wed»nd: Frioids, beach, sm, exercise, music, 
relaxation. 

Dream vacatkm: Prague, C^ecko^ovakia f<x two. 
go all over Europe and then see what Australia has to 
offer. 

Pavoritemagaxfaie: TMnSeot. . .no, wait, actually, 
I think they all have too many «is 

I drive a: 1990 Nissan Stanza (note die nnelation 
b^ween occupioion and car). 

Dream car: Luxury 1993 SE-V64x4.4-door Nissan 
Pathfimfer - a ctf ea^ tt) esc^ thb wdl-bettoi path. 

Favmite wporti F^M hodcey. 

Fav«Mrlte aporta tarn: My own. 

Wbo do yoa mumt admire: It's a toss up bttween 



Daniel Goldin. our new NASA administrator, and John 
Gimenez. my pastOT. 

What do you like to do to relax after a hard day's 
work: Play Softball, thai sit down with a cool drink and 
laugh with friends. 

Your favwrite food and drink: The only thing I don't 
like istricra. And I love water. 

Favorite restaurant: No favorites - 1 like them all!. 

Favorite food to cook: Dinner in large quantities and 
for a large amount of fxaple. 

Favorite article of clothing: Emings. 

Favorite televisioii program: Star Trek, The Next 
Generation renins •. 

¥»\oriUmovk: Monty Python'sandthe Holy Grail. 

Your favorite type of music: Alternative, with a bit 
of funk thrown in. 

Favorite entertainer: Rise. (My band) and Mel 
Giteon. 

The happiest time in your life, so far: Every time I 
go on Aage with those boys. 

If you were to become famous, what would you 
want to be famous for: Bringing hope to those who 
dcMi't think ifaey have any. 

What is the most taa time you have had in the past 
week: Tri{q}ing the light fantastic with a college bud. 

If you could pidi just two (^ the folkiwing, which 
woold you pick: brabu, looks, a good personality w 
wealth? A good personality and money. 

Wlnt do you think b om of the biggest problems 
fadng the wtH^d: People don't go all out for their 
dreams. I diink it's because (tf a lack of people who are 
willing 10 say "Go f(»- iti You can do it!" 

What do yon think Is (me of the b^st prtAlems 
fMtag Virginia Beach: It's becommg tnoK lilre a Uv^ 
bkxdc of comnMxcialized cement tlun a luA, beautiAil 
place to live. 

What do you Hke moat about VbYhiia Beach: The 
pecqile. the beach,d)e peo|de. the worn wetther and the 
pec^le. 

If you conM spend 10 minutes akme with tte 
President George Bush, what would you talk 
ab<Mit?:I would ask him how Barbara was doing, and 
th^ spend die next 9i minutes focusing on eternity - 
scrfkiting his help and wfipcHt to aart a nittkmal imd- 
grvn to bring people tack 10 tMr (beams »id to offer 
tK^ and encoun^nent I ittvea plan, ttid, yes. I want 
to save the w(xid. 



Chance for change; 
Robb's number's up 

By GREG GOLDFARB 
Virginia Beach Sun Managing Editor 

So thov they are. Th(MisfflMls and 
thousands of liberal Democ^ts, nest- 
ing in New Yotk City, chirping for 
cl^gein American govonmem. It's 
all so "sincere." 

It's fascinating how much more 
socially and politically a^te many 
people, not all by a kmg shot, but 
many, have become. More cleariy 
than ever are the Amerrcan. pec^le 
understanding the simplicity, and the 
multidimensionalism, of war and 
peace, life and death, love and hate, 
wealth and poverty, and egocentric- 
ity as it relates to compassion.- 

The problem for politicians, 
though, is educating, not brainwash- 
ing, the masses to understand that 
when they vole for political candi- 
dates, they are supposed to be voting 
for ideas and visions that will make 
America better. 

But, in ageneral sense, peopledon't 
like to think, to learn. That's hard 
woric. They prefer lo leave that dirty 
job to journalists, columnists, editors 
and Iwoadcasiers. We are the ones 
that interview the candidates and try 
to make some determination whether 
or not this or that particular man or 
woman is fit for public service: Men 
and wonen of virtue, strong morals, 
an eye for decency and humanity, 
and on and on. Bitt unfortimately, 
John Wayne is no longer around. So 
we looked to Ronald Reagan fcv in- 
spiration. Then, the Wimp. Now we 
are supposed to choose betwera a 
pint-sized autocratic billionaire who 
would like to rule the country, a failed 
aristocratic capitalist who tried to lead 
the country, and sax-playing, pot 
smc^ing, womanizing, draft-(!odg- 
ing governor - Bubba - sometimes 
known as Slick Willie, all of whom 
are trying to cash in on the voters' 
discontentmenL Bush will not be re- 
elected; Perot in the Whit e Hou se 
would be a joke. Therefore, unless 
something unforseen happens. 
Clinton will be munching Bush's left- 
over poik rinds come next January. 
This observation is not an enctorse- 
ment, just a prediction. 

On other note, U.S. Sena- 
tor Charles Spittal Robb i:»uld have 
been an all-star at this year's Na- 
tional Democratic Convemion if he 
had not tried to be an all-star in the 
Vir^nia Beach games of seduction 
and pseudoseduction. Sure, Robb is 
blithering 
around the con- 
vention floor, 
signing auto- 
gr^hs in Play- 
boy: btit right 
about now, his 
knees are shak- 
ing. He lowws 
Uiat in all likeli- 
hood, before the 
November elec- 
tion, he will be 
federally indicted on about 20 charges 
related to the illegal taping of a car 
telephone conversation between Gov- 
ernor L. Douglas Wilder and Chesa- 
peake developer, Daniel Hofllcr. On 
the tape. Wilder disswRoW). What's 
eventually going to come oitt is that, 
whereas the former governor said he 
didn't know his ofHce had posses- 
sion of the tape for years, not cmly did 
Robb know about it. die ti^ was 
actually placed directly in Chuck's 
pulsating palm at the beginning of 
this episode, by the man who did the 
taping, Virginia Beach's Robert 
Dunnington. 



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Virwnia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 15. 1992 3 



The mayor travels 
to Japan to visit 
Beach's sister city 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 



I recently was invited to visit 
Virginia Beach's sister city of 
Miyazaki, Japai. The trip -vim paid 
for by the Miyazidd Friendship 
Association, die city of Miyazaki 
and the Hiroshima Prefectural 
Assembly. 

Ilcft 
Virginia 
Beach in late 
May and 
arrived in 
Tokyo the 
next after- 
noon. After a 
brief tour of 
T(*yo, we • 
were on to 
Miyazaki. 

I was 
making my 
first trip to the 
Far East. 1 
knew I was 

going to a 

country 
inhabited by articulate people who 
have a strong work ethic that has 
made them almost giants in the 
minds of the rest of the wotM. 
It's true that they do have a 
facility for hard work and dedica- 
tion as they continue to adapt to the 
changes that have occurred since 
World War II. They also are a 
people who absolutely have made 
the concept of quality and being 
customer-driven synonymous with 
the products they turn out I 
observed these same qualities in 
how they treat sister city mayors 
and visitors as well as the people 
within their country. 

Our sister city of Miyazaki is a 
beautiful resort city. I could not get 
over how smxXdx out cities are. One 
part of the city faces the Pacific 
Ocean and one part of the city faces 
a river. They told me they have not 
been host to very many westerners. 
When they talked about my city of 
Virginia Beach they called it m 
international city. When I stopped 
to listen to my city being described 
by new eyes and new ears. I saw 
that indeed we have come of age 
and we are an international city. 
We host two and one half million 
visitbis each year frort all Qver the 
world. Even though I'm known as 
one of the greatest boosters of 
Virginia Beach, it made me feel 
even better about our city to hear it 
described by foreignere. 

One thing that impressed me 
most of all was the fact that their 
children can move with absolute 
safety and security throughoiit the 
entire country. It is completely 
foreign to their culture that any 
child would be harmed or kid- 
napfeA by an adult. J^ianese 
children grow up in a very caring, 
nurturing and r^ponsible atmo- 
sphne. Because of this diey have 
great respect iat their society. They 
have an internal motivation to do 
the right thing. The children are all 
beautiful. I just fell in love with 
ttem. Whether I was at a shrine or 
a temple or the memorial in 
Hiroshima, to feel thu flood of 
children gave me such efiei^. 



I planted a camellia 
to commeorate the 
friendship between 
Bflyazaka and Vir- 
glnia Beach. Believe 
me, it wasn't just a 



little camellia shrub. 
It was a huge tree. 

I'm told I was the fb^ Westerner 
invited b go into the Miyazaki Hall 
of Assembly. They have 40 council 
members and a mayor. Our signing 
of the sister city agreement 
between Miyazaki and Virginia 
Beach was as formal as a major 
treaty between nations. We sat at 
tables with green feU tablecloths 
and they had beautiful pens for 
each one of us to sign with and then 
the pen was given to me as a gift It 
was done with such pomp and such 
ceremony that it will nevn' be 
erased ftam my mind. 

Mayor Nagatomo, the 
mayor of our sister 

city of Miyazaki, is a very 
learned, very charming gentleman. 
He took me to show me his point of 
pride • a camellia park in the 
mountains. He had a barren 
mountainside planted with trees 
and now it looks like a patchwork 
quilt all done in shades of green. 
The camellia park is breathtaking. I 
planted a camellia to commemorate 
the friendship between Miyazaki 
and Virginia Beach. Believe me, it 
wasn't just a little camellia shrub. It 
was a huge tree. The plaque said. 
"This tree is a gift from Mayor 
Meyera Obemdorf and the citizens 
of Virginia Beach to the citizens of 
Miyazaki." 

Then Mayor Nagatomo took me 
back down toward the ocean and to 
his iris park. He has takeii a 
wetlands area and planted the most 
exquisite iris gardens you have evor 
seen. They put in little wooden 
walkways where the children were 
walking and dancing among the 
flowers without fnjuring them. It 
was all in concert with the environ- 
ment I'd live to see us dcvetop 
either an iris or camellia park in 
Virginia Beach. 

They have a formal tea house 
there where we had a formal tea 
ceremony. To be in J^an is not 
only a treat for die eyes, it's a treat 
for all of the senses. Even a meal is 
prqKUed with the same exacting 
detail that a famous artist-would 
use on a canvas he was creating. 

1 noticed the difference between 
their agribusiness and ours. They 
have many homes clustered 
together and the fields are divided 
off in very strict squares and 
rectangles. The family leaves that 
litde village setting where the 
homes are located to go out to the 
fields to work. They grow many 
different varieties of vegetables, 

Sm mayor, Page 5 



What should our 
schools teach? 



^^us week's Virginia Beach Sun 
ariicle was written by Keith Geiger. 
National Education Association 
president. 

Over a century ago the Forum, a 
leading journal of public commen- 
tary, published a long-running 

(^)ate titled. 
"WhatShaU 
the Public 
Schools 
Teach?" 
Today's 
debate about 
education 
coitains some 
surprising 
echoes of that 
latelggOs' 
effort to define 
what it is we 
want students 
to know and 
be able to do. 

Toll» 
Forum 
di»:iKsk}nof 
100 yeara ago, 

we've added 

ti» qiastion of how s:hooIs can 
best leach thc^ things we wait 
students to ^sn. MiKh of the 
discussi(N) at die nttiwal fe^l is 
now focu^ (Ni s^ng ^andsds 
fw Amoican schools - and severe 




The VBEA 
Report 

Lisa Guthrie, 
pretident of the 
Virginia Beach 
Education Am$o- 
ciation. 



The late-18808' de- 
bate about what 

* ■ 

sphools should teach 

was never really re- 

solvied. A hundred 

years later, we've 

resumed the dia- 

logue. 



pit^sals for developing national 
education standards are ctarently 
before Congress. 

Setting standards is a complex 
task. It's far more complex than 
writing a curriculum c« |Hescribing 
educational outcomes (what 
students should know and be able 
to do). Standards are statements of 
quality, and meaningful education 
Stand^ds will reflect tlu ways we 
want to improve schools. 

Three years ago. the Natiwial 
Council of Tochers of Mathemat- 
ics published ^andards fcv K-12 
math education. NCTM called its 
aaxteds tte result of three yems' 
work by mathematics i^esskmds, 

SMWHAT.f^gaS 




Virginia Btach Sm staff photo 



The hAflt*^ ftn Virginia Beach, In the throes of an Insufferable heat wave, fortunately has the nearby Atlantic 
1 1 IV I ivdi 9 wi I Qjjggj, jQ pQQi jj^gQ ^^ Q^Q„ ngQjj fQijgf froni the heat. 



The great V.P. guessing game 




LH'S 
Quill 



Lillian Youell, 
board member, 
Virginia Consor- 
tium fi^ Laiv-Re- 
lated Education. 



By the time this column is 
published, the Democratic Conven- 
tion will lie in full swing and you 
know that U.S. Senator AI Gore 
has been selected as its candidate 
for vKc president 

In the meantime, there is great 
speculation by the press and the 
public. But the leaders of the party 
are not 
expressing 
their opinions, 
and ultimately 
the delegates 
to die conven- 
tion will 
rubber-stamp 
the candidate 
actually 
chosen by a 
single po^n. 
The irony is 
that Ute choice 
is not that of 
the convention 
delegates, but 
actually of one 
constituent - 
the presiden- 
tial candidate. 
Years i^o, 
■ ■ the vice 

presidency was seen as a one-way 
ticket to oblivion. Daniel Webstn* 
turned down the offer to run for 
vice president saying, "I don't 
intend to be buried until I'm dead!" 
We all know the "bucket of spit" 
comment by an early vice presi- 
dent, who denigrated the office at 
that time. 

But today, the choice of a vice 
president is more than & pro forma 
polidcal act. It is a critical decision. 
If elected vice president, that 
person is only a heart beat away 
from the most powerful position in 
the worid. In fact, seven of the 
eight past vice presidents suc- 
' ceeded to diat highest office. 

Article II of the Constitution 
spells out the requirements for the 
office of president "No Person 
except a natural bom Citizen, or a 
Citizen of the United States at the 
time of the Adoption of the 
Constitution, shall be eligible to the 
Office of President; neither shall 
any person be eligible to that 
Office who shall not have attain«l 
to the Age of thirty five Years, and 
been fourteen Years a Resident 
widiin the United States." 

Thus, there sue few constitu- 
tional qualifications: - a 35-ycar- 
old. native bom citizen, 14-year 
resident of the U.S. These apply 
also to the vice president The i2th 
Amendnwnt states, "iw pnson 
constitutionally ineligible to the 
office of President shall be eligible 




OUAUTY 
WORD PROCESSING 

Uipeix( Reaumea 

ChoKtop f\Mafmtt 

Hadiaal Dxmaeripam 

Cotre^xxuieno* 

Coqolkdqn 

LasUn lamsa - SiUie 107 

Virginia Beach. VA 23454 

(804)422-5775 
Fax (804) 428-3708 



If elected vice president, that person is only 

a heart beat away from the most powerful 

position in the world. 



to that of Vice-President of the 
United States." 

For years, politicians insisted on 
balancing the ticket geographically. 
Today, that seems less relevant 
Other more important qualifica- 
tions are character, experience, 
family relations and political 
convictions. 



Hal Bruno, ABC's political 
consultant, commented from a 
political standpoint, of course, "A 
presidential candidate needs 
someone who won't harm him and 
gives balance to the ticket." We 
hope the vice president will be 
someone whom We the People can 
admire and who will help, not harm 



the country. 

The choice of a running mate 
says a great deal about the candi- 
date for president. After all, his 
selectee will reflect the selector's 
wisdom or lack thereof. We the 
People will be stuck with his choice 
eitl^r way. 



Making choices is a challenge 
each of us faces daily, but the 
candidate's choice of a vice 
president is a significant choice 
which could affect all of us for 
years to come. 



Linkhorn Park Garden Club names its new officers 



Newly elected president, Mrs. 
Mark Bundy, will serve the 
Linkhom Park Garden Club for the 
coming year. 

Other officers serving the club 
will be Mrs. Richard Carlson, first 
vice-president; Mrs. George Clark, 
second vice-president; Mrs. K.G. 
Gimbert, recording secretary; Mrs. 
Richard Creecy, correspondihg sec- 
retary; and Mrs. Jeffrey Klein, trea- 
surer. 

The club recently held its ninth 
annual bridge party. Proceeds fiom 
the event will be used for the beau- 
tification of the community. 
Awards to club members were pre- 
sented at the party. Grace Easson 



was the winner of the Bridge 
Marathon and Margaret Camp sec- 
ond. Mrs. Nell Whitehurst won the 



club's annual prize for flower ar- 
rangements; and Mrs Ruth Pardue 
for horticulture. 



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HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



□ New Subscr^jtton D Renewal 

nease mail this oiupon with your check to: 

SUN, 138 S. Rosemont Rd.. Virginia Beach, VA ^452 

RATES: Within 40 miles of Virginia Beach: 

[] One year $14.95 U Tw© years $24.50 

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mmmmmm 



4 Vgginia Beach Sun. Wedn^tfay. July 15. 1992 





Man killed in College Park; 
alleged child molester charged 



Su^>ected bank robber 

Nations Bank 
robber's pic 
is released 

Virginia Beach poli(% are lot^ng 
for a bsik loi^xr whose phott^raph 
was talcen. Crime Solvers is offer- 
ing a cash reward of up to $1,000 
for infonnation that leads to his ar- 
nsL 

On Tuesday, June 23 about 9 
a.ni., the Nations Banli in the 200 
block of Independence Boulevaid 
near Virginia Beach Bouievani, was 

'^^.'^crTn^LZi^g Police find new hieasures of success 






Al CarRa and Mechelie Bo^ 



money. After getting the money, 
the robber ran bom the bai^L 

The robber is described as white, 
in his late teens or eariy twenties, 
about 5'4' tall, with a muscular 
buikhng, sh(»t light brown hair and 
a mustache. He was wearing a black 
T-shirt. Khaki cok)red shorts, blade 
tennis shoes, a Boston Red Sox's 
c^, and was canyii^ a gym b%. 

Anyone who recognizes this mm 
can eam a cash reward by calling 
Crime Solvers at 427-0000. 



Delegates from 
Japan to visit 
city this week 

A delegation of city employees 
and citizens from Miyazaki, Japan 
will be in Virginia Beach, begin- 
ning on July 16. The group will 
tour tiK Virginia Beach City Hall 
complex and meet with Mayor 
Mcyera E. Obemdorf on July 17. 

Miyazaki is the sisur city of 
Virginia Beach. Obemdorf visited 
Miyazaki in May and encouraged 
the exchaige program. 

This is an opportunity for a 
professional exchange of i(teas and 
information between our empkiyees 
and U»e employees from Miyazaki." 
Obemdorf said. "Visitors will be 
staying with Virginia Beach em- 
ployees so we will also have a 

peq>le to people exchange," she 

„ ,■1,1^,1 
adoBd. 

During their stay, the delegation 

will also tour sites in Norfolk and 

Williamsburg and depart on July 

20. 



Flax workshop set 

The Francis Land House will 
hoU a flax |nTx:essing workshop on 
Tu^day, August 4 from 9 ajn. to 
3 pjn. at the house, 3131 Virginia 
BeacA Boulevard. 

Registratim deadline is July 28 
and limited to 20 i^rticiiants. The 
$3S fee includes lunch and instruc- 
ti(mal booklet 

Call 340-1732 fw more infOTma- 
tion. 



By DAWN TAYLOR 
Special to The VrgMa Beach Sun 

When Al Carila and MecheDe 
Boyd patrol their beat, they com- 
mand not only the attrition, but 
also the respect of the people they 
oicounler. 

Although good-natwed, they lake 
their work seriously. These officers 
represent the law mforcement com- 
ponent of the city's community 
policing program. Baaed on a prob- 
lem-oriented policing (POP) phi- 
losophy, goals are achieved by in- 
creasing law enforcement and the 
introducing services to the commu- 
.nity. Hie ultimate result is laft, 
well-maintained neighborhoods, 
with residents who are civic- 
minded. 

Community policing is a new 
trend nationwide. Unlike less suc- 
cessfully program's with a single 
focus Carila said, "this program 
doem't have a weakness. This pro- 
gram won't fail." The initial suc- 
cess of the program in Williams 
Village/Princeton Lak^ confirms 
Carila's opinion. Since moving 
inK) the area, police calls have been 
reduced more than 40 pttceai A 
tenant association bdists over X 
active membos. 

When asked if POP was working, 
William Village resident Jane Clore 
said, "Oh yes! . . . There arc no 
wOTds to describe how swxessful 
they've been. There's no more 
shooting, no one standing on the 
comers selling drup . . . ywi can 
sit out in your yard and talk to 
neighbors now." Theirs was the 
first area to beiMfit frtwn the POP 
program, modeled ifta a similar 
pro^l in HousUNi. 

Unlike Houston, however, Vir- 
ginia Be«;h's program is coupled 
with a Community Action Re- 
source Empowerment (CARE) 
committee to provi(fe city services 
to these high-risk neighborhoods. 
Agencies such as Housing, Social 
Services, Substance Abuse and 
PuMic Health serve on the 
committee. Working with Capt. 
Ernest Rofrer, who oversees the 
POP program, CARE q)ened a po- 
lice annex in Williams Vil- 
lage/Princeton Lakes which serves 
as a mini-precinct and meeting 
house. A similar annex is now 



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opea in Lake Edward. CARE re- 
cemly recdved a national award. 

Coordination of aer- 
▼Icea la Crndal said Master 
Police Officer John McDonald, 
who, with Oflken P.A. Cunan and 
Lucian Coiley, dev^iped ihe Thod 
Precinct progr^n. All he has to do 
is pidc op die phone and rqxm a 
broken street light, and it's fixed 
within a few days. Without a 
facilitator, it might be difficult to 
get such speedy service. 

If these programs are the 
"positive" side of the POP 
philosophy, "I guess we're the neg- 
ative side," Carila admiu. He and 
Boyd assist facilitaton by aggres- 



sively enforcing the law in these 
troul^ed oeigMiorhoods. 

After a neighborhood is surv^ed, 
"heayy-hitte" officers come in lo 
eliminate the criminal elements. 
These officers aggressively trade 
offenden and wayward juvenifes. 
Their increased presence md Km^ 
reputation discoirage imlai^ ac* 
tivity. while pnmioting trust, co- 
operation and mutual letpecL 

Quantitative measures, are still 
used, but appraisals sud as the ex- 
citement in Jane Oare's voice and 
the h^ness of the neighboriiood 
children are more importaitt in de- 
termining soccMS. "We've invested 
something in Uieae neighborhood" 
said Carila, proudly. 




6,000 people 
helped to make 
July 4 great 

By APRIL OBRIEN 
Special to The Virgina Beach Sun 

U was a day to remember our 
independoKe and to relax in the sun 
at Virginia Beach's 24th Stre« Paric 
on July 4, 1992. 

More than 6.000 pcopte enjoyed 
music and the Ms. East Coast 
Surfing Championship beauty 
pageuiL 

After music by The Hazzards. 
Savannah and The Platters, the All- 
American celebratim ended with 
fireworks from tlw 14th Street pier. 
It was. indeed, a day to retnonber. 



Virgimia Btaek Sm tU^plulM. 




The Vkpsm Beach Pirfice De- 
petnwnt reMittly reported die fol- 
lowiogcnsMs: 

Al ^iprnxiwaely 12:40 a.n. on 
SoBdiV. Jriy 12. police responded 
10 a reported siiool^ in the l^KX) 
i^Kk (tf Gtyndoa Drive in Colte^ 
PMfc. 

Ujpoa arri^ng, (tfBcers dbcovered 
a lS-ye«-old male had been shot 
The vidHD was pn]QOiBK»i dead at 
te scene by leKoe persomel. 

AcooniiBg io witneaes a car (te- 
acriied as a «MlB Reaank Allianoe. 
widi a heacB^ out, had polled iq) 
10 ike curt) nes die iittaiection (rf 
Clyntai Drive »d CaU^e huk 
Bootevard. The witness^ heard 
whitt sounded like an arfnnieat nd 
diea heard several gouliots. The 
victiiB wdked .to a h«ne in the 
1^)0 Hodr of Olyndon Drive and 
ccOspsed into the front door of the 
resideace. The victim had suffoed 
what qipeaed lo be multiple gun- 
sfaqt woumb 10 the iqiper body area. 

This is the 11th Irainicide of tte 
year for the cky. 

The investigatioo into this inci- 
doit is contittuing 1^ memben of 
the depar tm e n t's homicide squad, 
with Detective P.C. Yodcaro as the 
lesd nvesii^aior. 

Anyone wiA infonnalioa regsd- 
t^ this case a asioed lo call Crime 
Solvers at 427-0000. Callers may 



reman anonymous and cookT be el- 
igiUe for iq) to a $1,000 rew»d for 
iitfomntion leading tow anest. 

Virginia Beach polk« have ar- 
rested Kevin Ballance, 25. of the 
900 block of Avatar Drive in Vir- 
ginia Beach fa mofeAing ttree 
Virginia Beach childrra (two dght- 
year-oU boys md one ^jil-year-dd 

girt). 

The chargn ston from mcidents 
occiffrmg »nce January of thb year. 
All the victims and BalUnoe knew 
each other. 

Ballance was origimdly orcstBd at 
8:20 a.m. on July 9, 1992, after ^ 
being intnviewed tt ptritce head- 
quarters. He was sOYCd widi addi- 
tional charges lata* the sdme day 
and was Krved wiA ikmc chaifes 
on July 10, 1992. 

Ballance has beoi diarged with 
nine counu of z^xvaM sexual 
battery, six counts of sodomy ami 
one count each of indecent Uberties 
and ^xhiction and is cunendy being 
heU m the Virginia Beach City Jail 
without bond. 

The investigation into these 
incidents and the possibility of 
otho' amilar incidents is continu- 
ing by DeMtive D.S. Ford of the 
department's Investigative Division. 

Anyone with further informatioi 
is ask«l to call Detective Ford at 
427-4101 or 427-5616. 



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ByLEECAHILL 

Virginia Beach Sun City Cound RepoftBT 

TraditKHial mn-of-the-mill ap- 
pointmoits U3 r^ional boanls and 
comadsaofis became a platform in 
Virginia Beach recently fw what 
looked like a power aruggle be- 
twem two frac^ns on city council. 
Of tlvee controversial appoint- 
ments niacte, one especially - an 
tppoaameat to the Tidewater Vir- 
ginia Alcohol Safety Awareness 
Prognm (TVASAP) Policy Board - 
underaiined die ffijthority of Mayor 
Mqfcn Obemdorf . 

Obemdorf remarked on the mci- 
dent later that it was an enbrt of 
Cowcibnembo- Paul J. Lanieipe 
"to try 10 control the office of 
mayor. Hie piobton is he does not 
seem to want to toloate" the fact 
that the people *Sfoted for me as 
m^ror and wOl tid» every opponu- 
nity, even if the puUic elected me . 
.. he will not let me »avt witbre- 
tptcL' 

For his part, Untdgne said that 
the cooiicU consiatt of U peqile 
with different ofrinions who are not 
^ing 10 apee on every isaie. 

The local ASAP board is made 
up of 15 represeniuiyes from Vir- 
ginia Beach and NcwfoDc and headed 
by Kevin Conn^. chairperson. At 
teast one member from each coun- 
cil, according to the by-laws, 
should be (wj the board which is 
ai^inted ultimately by the ASAP 
commissicm headquartered in Rich- 
mond. OthCT members of the board 
include the jiKiciary, treatment and 
substance abuse people, the two 
pcriJce chiefs aid citizens-at-lvge. 

Conroy said that the board voted 
unwimously to endorse Dean, he 
can't imagine that the boaid will 
change iu position. However, he 
said, it is possible that the com- 
mission may aj^int both Dean 
and Branch to the bcnrd. 

At present. Coiaoy said, the pro- 
gram is being operated by a repre- 
sentative of the commission and 
Conroy. The board is currently 
locking fw an executive director to 
replace Denault who resinied June 
25. 

Obondorf said that historically 
the mayor submits a name, and 
with the endorsement of the local 
boutl. his^er name is sent to the 
commission fw final approval. 
Virginia Beach hasn't had a ccmukU 
representative f<w two years, since 
Albot Balko lost his Lynnhaven 
Borough seat lo James W. Brazier, 
Jr. Balko had been nominated to the 
bovd by Louis R. Jcmes, who was 
mayor at the time. 

So when the TVASAP then ex- 
ecutive director, Donald Denault, 
asked die mayor to submit a nme, 
she leoMnmended Robot K. Dam 
in a ieaa to Denault (fatted June 16 
nd ''never gave it another thoo^L" 
Dean was sidMequently oidorsed by 
diebotfd. 

Lanteigne, however, had been 
givsig die maner some tfwught. He 
said ]Ma thtt he hu beai intnvsted 
in alcdiol and substance abuK dw- 
ing his 18 years bi law midtce- 
m»iL Lanteigne is a ^geant on 
Ae Vbfmta Beat* Ptrfice I^ce, Ifc 
becMie intoesttd in tlM board va- 
amy toamme in May whra he 
talced with Draanlt. he said. liKMt 
he need to have council name 
aomeone to the bcwd. The bmed 
ateo wim Ae oqpnzation 10 com 
m^^ die nmlHidIa of tiie city of 
Vi^nia BMch (and lkri<Sk) as it 
uediobe. 



Tlw ASAP appointment was not 
listed in the regular agenda along 
widi other boards and commissions, 
but when Dean's appointment was 
brought up during the executive 
session called by council to discuss 
appointments to boards and com- 
missions, Obemdorf said that 
Lanteigne said, "That's not your 
prerogative.' We're nominating 
Unwood Branch, and youll have to 
say you're in error." 

Obemdorf said that 
she refused to write sudi a 
letter and that if Lanteigne wanted 
to. he could toing the mittter up in 
the open sesskm. 

The vote in open session could 
have been 7-4 like the other two 
controversial votes, but it was 8-3 
because Dean voted for Branch. It 
wasn't 10 much that he voted fw 
Brandi. he said, but that he wanted 
to save die mayor some emtMr- 
rassment He said that he intended 
to remain a gei^eman. "If my ctm- 
duct hai any influence whatever," 
he said, "it will improve the con- 
duct (tf council toward the women 
(on council)." 

The three votes for Dean were 
cast by the mayor and couiKil 
members Nancy Parker and John D. 
Moss. 

(%emdcrf q)ok)gized to Dean for 
placing him in an untenable posi- 
tion. "Nobody ever came to me and 
smd thoe was going to be a pnib- 
lem. I didn't want Robert Dean's 
reputation to be besmirched in any 
way." 

Obemdorf added that it may be 
the first time in the history of Vir- 
ginia Beach ttmt the name of s(xne- 
one recommended by tte ma^ has 
been wididrawn. 

Befrae he went into the executive 
session, Lanteigne said later, he 
wtB aware Uiat the mayor was sub- 
mitting Dean's name as her q>- 
pointmrat. But, he said, the q>- 
pointment should be a vote of the 
majMityofthebody. 

He said later that he h^ consid- 
ered Branch for the job back in 
May. 

Regardless of what han^ens. said 
Obemdorf. "I will continue to con- 
duct myself as a lady." 

At last week's meeting. Obem- 
dorf said that it was an embarrass- 
ing situation. She said she thought 
she was doing "what I thought was 
historically ^jpn^atc." 

Dean said that his nane had al- 
ready gone to the state commission 
and that he. too, was concerned 
about his leputiKion. 

Lanteigne said that the people 
sitting on council were "all adults." 
and that wten sonwone repre^nts 
city cwmcil, he has to represent 
city council . . . none of us send 
crmies ... I don't want to v«e 
apinst Dean ... I'm sure we will 
have a unanimous vote" swnetime. 
he said. Iwt that he thcwiht that 
Branch, the formo^ [wesdaK of the 
HMd and MmbI Association at the 
Beach, would haw better iniwt for 

iIk safety {mjpffin. Because of his 
.experience at the Occanfront, he 
said later, and in special events - 
Branch was on llw LtixH Day 1990 
Committee - H vi^Hild take to the 
bond some expmise. 

"I f^l like Dean, and I walked 
into a bev trap ... 1 had no idea 
De% alr«Kly had been appointed . . 
. 1 will support Dean for a 
commission (when something 
comes up)." saki Biwich. 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday, July 15, 1992 5 ■ 




What should our schools teach? 



Mayor Obemdorf and Stephanie Hall 




Mayor Oberndorf and Tom Bettcher 

Maury Riganto Memorial Award 
student athlete winners announced 



D Contlnutd From Pag* 3 

"facilitators of reform, rather than a 
set of directives." 

The first NCTM standard for 
grades K-4. "Mathematics as 
Problem Solving," gives an idea of 
the nature of subject area standards. 
"In grades K-4, mathematics 
should emphasize problem solving 
so that students can use problem- 
solving approaches to investigate 
and understand mathematical 
content: formulate problems from 
everyday and mathematical 
situations; develop and apply 
strategies to solve a wide variety of 
problems; verify and interpret 
results with respect to the original 
problem; acquireconfidence in 
using mathematics meaningfully." 

These are broswl, nonprcscriptive 
standards. They don't limit local 
education decisions or constrain the 
diversity and vitality of our 
schools. 

Setting national 
standaras does not imply 

developing a national curriculum - 
or a national test. The purpose of 
national standards is not to dictate 
local decisions or establish federal 
control over schools. The purpose 
is to set goals and allow states and 
local communities to determine 
how their schools can most 
effectively meet them. 
Nor is it the federal 
government's role to monitor 
achievement of the standards. The 
federal role is that of catalyst • 
facilitating the setting of standards 
and sharing information about 



exemplary school programs. The 
federal govonment should also 
play a much larger role in ensuring 
that inequities among schools don't 
make standard-setting a cruel sham. 

To be meaningful, standards 
requite ccHisensus. We need broad 
agreement that our natiomd 
education standards reflect the 
goals we want schools and students 
to attain. The authority for setting 
standards must be placed in a body 
that is both independent of special 
interest and accountable to a broad 
array of constituencies and con- 
cerns. 

National Education Association 
members across the country are 
working with other educators to 
develq) standards in their states. 
Michigan and Pennsylvania, for 
example, are working on develop- 
ing broad state standards - leaving 
local school systems to determine 
the best way to meet those stan- 
dards. 

In a number of states • incliKling 
Virginia, Vermont, California and 
Connecticut - NEA members are 
involved in using new methods to 
assess achievement of state 
standards. In all these states, 
educators are develq)ing an 
important new knowledge base on 
which to establish national stan- 
dards for America's schools. ~ 

The late- 1 800s' dcbatfc about 
what schools should teach was 
never really resolved. A hundred 
years later, we've resumed the 
dialogue. We now have the 
opportunity to reach a national 
consensus. We have the opportu- 
nity t^^hape and significantly 
improve Amoica's schools. 




James Hall, on left, receives his award from John Atkinson, 
chapter activity chairperson. 



James K. Hall is named 
outstanding" accountant 



cc 



Mayor Oberndorf travels to Japan 



By PHYLLIS MANESS 
Spedal to The Virginia Beach Sun 

Mayor Meyera Obemdorf recently 
presented trophies to two recipients. 

Listed below is some background 
information on the award recipients. 

Stephanie Hall participated in 
basketball and softball in the 
Woodstock area of the city. She at- 
tended Kempsville High School and 
is now attending college. According 
to her coaches, she is a hard work- 
ing player with a super attitude. Her 
basketball coach says she is not 
only the leader on the court in per- 
fortrirfnce,'bul also in spoHsman- 
shij) and team ^iriL ' 

In Softball, she's the first one at 
practice and the last one to leave; 
she is also the first one in line to 
shake hands with her opponents and 
to lead the cheers for them win or 
lose, after the games. She is very 
team conscious and has a knack for 
making all of her team members a 
part of the success. She's been a 



team captain on practically every 
team she's played. 

Tom Bettcher participated in bas- 
ketball and baseball in the Wood- 
stock area of the city. He attended 
Kempsville High School and is 
now attending college. According to 
one of his baseball coaches, 
Bettcher has a model attitude. He 
shows sponmanship through every 
game, helps his teammates and 
plays any position needed. Al- 
though a fierce competitor, he al- 
ways remains cool and resourceful 
when the game is on the line. He is 
quick to praise an opponent and 
never condemns a teammate for an 
error, only offering encouragement 
to continue on. Bettcher is that 
"special type" of player that coaches 
"love to coach." He is the player 
that teammates look up to for that 
extra effort to pull them through 
those pressure situations. He exudes 
the calmness and command neces- 
sary to handle these situations with 
a maturity beyond his years. 



D ContlnuMJ From Pag* 3 

rice and strawberries. The young 
lady firom the Miyazaki ci^ 
government who acted as my 
translator brought some of the 
strawberries her parents had grown. 
She anonymously left them for me 
at my hotel suite. She never told me 
she had done this, but the manager 
at the hotel told me. I went to great 
pains to let her know how much I 
appreciated it. 

The people woe all v/aim and 
pleasant and more than willing to 



help. At this critical time whoi the 
news reports tell about "country 
bashing" by Japan and the U.S., I 
was relieved to find out that most 
people were just like me. When 
you meet people on a pec^le-to- 
peq)le basis, you find that you 
have the same aspirations, the saine 
desires, the same expectations and 
the same concerns. 

Note: To be continued in next 
week's issue. 

This article was compiled 
through the courtesy of Helen 
Spore, staff writer, PMic Informa- 
tion Office, city of Virginia Beach. 



By CINDY M.GRAY 

Special to The Virginia Beach Sun 

The Virginia Society of Certified 
Public Accountants (VSCPA) 
awarded the 1992 Outstanding 
Member of the Year award to James 
K. Hall of Virginia Beach. The 
award was presented during the so- 
ciety's 83rd annual meeting, held 
recently in Richmond. 

The award, which is presented 
annually, is designed to promote 
recognition of accounting as a pro- 
fession and to improve the individ- 
ual CPA's stature as a professional 
among his fellow citizens and col- 
leagues by encouraging active par- 
ticipation in civic, charitable and 
professional organizations. Hall, a 
managing partner with Edmondson, 
LedBetter and Ballard in Norfolk, 
was selected by the society's Chap- 
ter Activity Committee. 

Hall, a society member since 



1959, has served as VSCPA presi- 
dent, vice president and has served 
as a member of the board and as 
chairman on society committees. 
He has also served as president of 
the Tidewater chapter. 

In addition to this, Hall has 
served two terms on the board of 
visitors at Old Dominion Univer- 
sity and as president of their alumni 
association. Hall has also served on 
the board of directors for the 
university's research foundation and 
on the board of trustees for their 
educational foundation. 

Headquartered in Richmond, the 
VSCPA is a professional associa- 
tion whose 5,200 members are em- 
ployed in public practice, education, 
industry and 'government and are 
involved in improving their profes- 
sion through continuing profes- 
sional educaticm and maintenance of 
standards. 



Cinderella to open at theatre 



Anti-drunk driving group to meet 



Virginians Opposing Drunk 
Driving, Tidewater Chapter, will 
hold its monthly meeting on Tues- 
day, July 21 at 7 p.m. at the ASAP 
buildmg, 5163 Cleveland Street 

The topic of the meeting is "DUI 
Enforcement - Getting the Drunk 



Off die Road." 

Officers from several localities 
will be guest speakers. Victims and 
concerned citizens are invited to at- 
tend. 

For furdier information contact 
Lillian DeVenny at 497-2494. 



Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cin- 
derella will open at the Little The- 
atre of Virginia Beach on Friday, 
July 17 at 8 p.m. 

The musical will run through 
August 29 on Friday and Saturday 
nights at 8 p.m. and on Sunday af- 
ternoons at 3 p.m. 

The musical stars Elizabeth 
Evans as "Cinderella," Del Potter as 
"Prince Charming, "Mary Ann 
Rayment as the "Fairy Godmother," 
Ann Hicks as the "Wicked Step- 
mother," Judy Beasley and Faith 



Lancaster-Dickson as the "Two 
Stepsisters," and Robert Shirley 
and Edie Crouch as the "King and 
Queen." 

"Cinderella" is directed by Mark 
Hudgins, with musical direction by 
David Kunkel. Choreography is by 
Karen Buchheim and costumes are 
by Robert Weaver. 

The Little Theatre of Virginia 
Beach is located at the comer of 
24ih Street and Barberton Drive and 
reservations can be made by calling 
the box office at 428-9233. 



Sensational 




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For older Hampton Roads people, home is where the hurt is 



Homes can be hazardous to older 
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these habits into their lives. 

Injuries 
are no accident 

Several factors make oldo' peo- 
ple more prone to accidents. For 
example, poor eyesight and hearing 
C{m niake them less aware of poten- 
tial problems. Arthritis, neurologi- 
cal diseases and difflculties with co- 



ordination and balance can make 
them unsteady on their feet. 
Various other diseases, medications 
and alcohol can also result in 
drowsiness and distractions that can 
lead to accidents. 

Fall prevention 

The most common cause of 
home injury are falls. To avoid 



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falls, experts recommend that older 
people be encouraged to "fall-proor* 
their homes. This means teaching 
older adults to secure electrical cords 
(for television sets, lamps and other 
appliances), phone wiring and ex- 
tension cords to avoid tripping ova* 
them. 

Placing rubber matting or two- 
sided adhesive tape under small rugs 
and runners to make them slip re- 
sistant is also advised. In the badi- 
room, fall-prevention efforts include 
placing non-skid surfaces in the 
bathtub and installing "grab bars" 
on the walls. Installing light 
switches at the top and bottom of 
stairwells and handrails on both 
sides are also wise moves. 

Older people need to know that 
they should get up slowly after 
they've been sitting or lying down 
b^use they may become faint or 



dizzy if their blood pressure drops 
suddenly. To be safe, they should 
place both feet firmly on the floor, 
use their hands for support and 
stand up slowly. 

The don'ts of fall prevention for 
older people include: Don't store 
objects on the stairs (even tem- 
porarily) and don't stand on boxes 
or chairs to reach high shelves (use 
sturdy, secure ladders or step 
stools). 



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6 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 15. 1992 



NEWS FROM THE 



• • • 



I L I T A R 



• • 



• • 



Blandford takes part in USS George lyas/i/npfon commissioning 




Blandford 



By J01 (SW) GREGG L. SNAZA 
Special Report 

Invited to a ceremony that coin- 
cided with the annual celebration of 
our nation 's independence, more than 
15,000 guests were on hand at the 
Norfolk Na- 
val Base to 
witness the 
Navy bring 
its newest air- 
craft carrier, 
l/SS George 
Washington, 
into the fleet. 
First Lady 
Barbara 
Bush, the 
ship's spon- 
sor, was an 
honored 
guest. As the sponsor, Mrs. Bush 
cracked the uuditional bottle of cham- 
pagne across the carrier's bow at ear- 
lier christening events. 

Crewman J.H. Blandford, son of 
James and Joycelynn Blandford of 
Chesapeake, 
also took part 
in the com- 
missioning of 
the sixth 
Nimitz -class, 
nuclear-pow- 
ered aircraft 
carrier. 

As a mem- 
ber of the 
more than 
3,000-man 
ship's com- 
pany, Bland- 
ford, a second class petty officer, 
carried on a Navy tradition by racing 
aboard the 97,000-ton behemoth as it 
was ordered into active naval ser- 
vice. The carrier will serve naval 
aviation well into the 21st century. 

"My entire family was there," said 
the 31 -year-old Blandford, reliving 
the commissioning day ceremony. 
"It was nice for them to be able to see 
the ship put into commission." 

The forma! remarks made at the 
ceremony rcemphasized similar 
themes expressed in a May address to 
the Virginia Chamber of Commerce 
by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney. 
"I'm a great believer in aircraft 
carriers," the Defense Department's 
senior civilian official said. "I don't 
know anybody who has operated in 
the general national security area in 
recent years who wouldn't support 
that proposition. 

"Everytime there is a crisis, the 
first question the president always 
asks is, 'where is the nearest aircraft 




Bush 



carrier.* TTie aircraft carrier is a vital 
part of the force and will continue to 
be a vital part of the force, I would 
suspect, for my lifetime." 

Although not i»«sent at the com- 
missioning. President Bush did at- 
tend the christening of the Wash- 
ington in July of 1990. 

On that occasion Bush delivered a 
1 3-minute address stressing his com- 
mitment to a strong defense policy 
and to the need for continued con- 
struction of Navy ships. 

When it comes to the 

importance of the aircraft carrier in 
keeping worid peace, Blandford, a 
1 979 Indian River High School gradu- 
ate, is also convinced that ships like 
the Washington will continue to be 
one of the most viable assets of the 
nation's (tefense program. 

"When there's trouble, an aircraft 
carrier is always the first ship on the 
scene," said Blandford. "It's not easy 
explaining all the roles of the carrier 
to the public. Some of ouir congress- 
men need to come aboard a carrier so 
they can better appreciate what it can 
do - that's the only way the public 
will understand the real need for a 
ship like this." 

Blandford said he also felt a mix- 
ture of both relief and anticipation on 
the July 4 commissioning day. Com- 
missioning ceremonies marked an end 
of shipyard work and a new begin- 
ning of a fleet mission. 

Describing the job of the pre-com- 
missioning unit as "reward and diffi- 
cult work," Blandford said the atten- 
tion of the command will now be 
focused on preparation to meet the 
challenges of coming years. 

"Now that we're (the crew) out of 
the shipyard, it's time to go to 
sea," said Blandford. The morale 
of the crew is higher now than it's 
been in the past. It will get even 
higher when the crew gets their "sea 
legs." 

The Washington, along with her 
sister ships, will serve as the cen- 
terpiece of the Navy's force neces- 
sary to execute maritime strategy. 
Deployable to oceans worldwide, 
Washington, with her air wing em- 
barked, will serve as a visible pro- 
jection of power. 

According to Blandford, who 
serves as an aviation machinist's 
mate, the Washington won't make 
her first extended deployment until 
late 1 994, after the crew has had time 
to fine tune their operational skills. 
"I'll make the first deployment," 
said Blandford. I think we'll go to 
some great liberty ports. The Wash- 
ington is going to be a showboat, so I 



know we'll visit some nice places." 
Now in commission, Washington 
begins its training schedule. At sea 
the flattop will be joined by ov» 
3,000 additional men serving with 
the nine aircraft squadrons that make 
up the onboard air wing. 

The Washington's complement of 
more than 80 aircraft will include the 
combinatirai fighter and attack jet F/ 
A-18C Hornet, proven in combat in 
Operation Desert Storm; the F-14B 
Tomcat fighter; the twin turboprop 
E-2C Hawkeye, an early warning 
plane; the sub-hunting S-3B; the A- 
6E Intruder, an aging yet still effec- 
tive long-range bomber; its cousin in 
the EA-6B Prowler, used for elec- 
ironicwarfare; and the SH-60F CV- 
Helo that will eventually replace vin- 
tage anti-submarine warfare and res- 
cue helicq)ters, the SH-3H SeaKin^, 
which ^e being phased out. 

At sea, the George 

WiOShin^ton is virtually a float- 
ing city. Entertainment, education, 
physical fitness, religious programs, 
they're all integral parts of the shijv 
board routine that can last up to six 
months without interruption. 

When at sea, the 6,000-plus crew 
will be served IS.OCio meals daily 
from four serving lines. Airplanes 
will operate from 4.5 acres of flight 
deck. The ship itself will be able to 
steam at a top speed of 30 knots for 
more than 1 ,000,000 miles before its 
two nuclear reactors require refueling. 
The Washington is heir to a proud 
tradition of both naval and nuclear 
service. While it's the fourth ship to 
be named for the Commander-in- 
Chief of the Continental Army, it's 
only the second nuclear-powered 
vessel to bear his name. 

The first atomic-powered vessel 
named Washington was also the na- 
tion's first fleet ballistic missile sub- 
marine. USS George Washington 
(SSBN-598) was commissioned in 
December of 1959 and holds stake to 
the first successful submerged launch 
ofa Polaris missile. 

The Washington of today repre- 
sents technology not even though of 
when its prcdecessw entered the fleet. 
And the high-tech vessel is just in 
time. As overseas military bases are 
being substantially reduced, in part 
becauseof thecosts involved in main- 
taining them, a nuclear-powered 
carrier's diversity and proven ability 
toprotectU.S.inierestsabroad,make 
it a valuable and prudent peace keep- 
ing tool. 

The Navy has plans (funded by 
Congress in 1988) to add two addi- 
tional carriers to the arsenal; John C. 




U.S.NaiyPtiale 



Placed into commission on July 4, the USS George Washington (CVN 73) is the Navy's sixth 
Nimitz class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. The ship's sponsor, First Lady Barbara Bush, 
and 15,000 guests were present at the Norfolk Naval Station as the Washington was placed 
into active service. Costing $3.5 billion, the Washington represents the future of naval avi- 
ation. 



Siennis in 1995 and United States in 
1997. 

While discussion continues be- 
tween elected officials and senior 
military officials from each of the 
armed services about where future 
defense monies should be spent, 
there's no argument that when it 
comes to reaction time, a carrier still 



represents the most rapid and inde- 
pendently sustainable response to 
international crisis. 

The necessity of maintaining su- 
periority over the seas is not a new 
concept. In correspondence drafted 
in 1780, General Washington wrote, 
"Under all circumstances, a decisive 
naval superiority is to be considered 



a fundamental principle, and the ba- 
sis upon which all hopes of success 
must ultimately depend." 

Blandford will serve aboard the 
Washington until February of 1995. 

JOl (SW) Gregg L. Snaza is a 
Navyphotojournalist assigned to the 
Navy Public Affairs Center in Nor- 
folk. 



Area personnel return home after 
deployment on the USS America 



The aircraft carrier USS America 
recently rqxnted to its homqxirt of 
Norfolk following a six-month 
deployment to the Mediterranean, 
Red Sea and Persian Gulf. 

Those aboard participated in vari- 
ous operations and training exer- 
cises while the America led its 12- 
ship battle group. The carrier and 
its escorts conducted numerous ex- 
ercises with NATO allies in the 
Mediterranean and with the 





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Egyptian Air Force in the Red Sea. 
Once in the Gulf, more training 
was performed with the armed 
forces of Kuwait, Qatar and Saudi 
Arabia. 

The return of the USS America 
to the Gulf earned it the distinction 
of becoming the first Gulf War vet- 
eran ship to redeploy to the region 
in the post-war period. 

The America also visited several 
foreign ports including Palma De 
Majorca, Spain; Naples, Italy; 
Souda Bay, Crete; Athens, Greece; 
Antalya, Turicey, Haifa, Israel and 
Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United 
Arab Emirates. 

Area personnel include: 

Cmdr. William C. McWethy, 
whose wife, Tamyr, is the daughter 



of Margaret M. Carrow of Kelvor 
Lane in Virginia Beach. 

Senior Chief Petty Officer 
Edgardo S. Evangelista, son of 
Fidel F. Evangelista of Smokey 
Lane in Virginia Beach. 

Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert 
A. Meyer, son of Jayne M. Meyer 
of Coquina Avenue in Virginia 
Beach. 

Petty Officer 2nd Class 
Christopher S. Bumey, whose wife, 
Ann, is the daughter of James P. 
and Deloris Davis of 425 Longleaf 
Road in Virginia Beach. 

Petty Officer 2nd Class Kenneth 
W. Matthews, whose wife, Mary is 
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Navy Petty Officer 1st Class 
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Mario A. Vinalon Sr. of Greenleaf 
Terrace, Portsmouth, recently re- 
turned aboard the tank landing ship 
USS Newport, homeported in Nor- 
folk, following a six-month de- 
ployment to the Mediterranean. 

Vinalon participated in various 
operations and training exercises as 
the ship operated with the USS In- 
chon Mediterranean Amphibious 
Ready Group. The MARG con- 
ducted nine majgr exercises. During 
one of these, the large scale NATO 
exercise Dragon Hammer '92, the 
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MARG joined forces with Spanish. 
British, Italian and Gredc amphibi- 
ous ships to form the largest am- 
phibious task force assembled in 
the Mediterranean in the past 
decade. 

The MARG and its 4,300 sailws 
and Marines visited 16 ports in nine 
countries. 

This was USS Neyiport's last 
Mediterranean cruise. The ship will 
be decommissioned this fall. 

Vinalon joined the Navy in Oc- 
tober 1981. 

Howard to dedicate 
TQL at Little Creeic 

The Honorable Dan Howard, 
under secretary of the Navy, will 
address All Hands at Naval 
Amphibious Base Theater, Bldg. 
3504 at 1 1 a.m. on July 23, 1992. 

His speech will highlight the 
implementation of Total Quality 
Leadership in the Navy. In celebra- 
tion of the official opening of the 
Total Quality Leadership 
Department at Naval Amphibious 
School, Little Creek, the under 
secretary will conduct a ribbon cut- 
ting at 1 1:30 a.m. in Bldg. 3S04 on 
Uw 3rd deck, in front of room 346. 



Watch the 

upcoming issues 

for more 

"News From 

The Military." 



1 



■■^■■■■■■■■l 



n 



Michael Rau 



Oontbuwd ^om hig« 1 
of Rau's time. Perot »i]qx)rter by 
day, Rau turns toward his musical 
promotions at night and in his 
spare time. 

He is woiimg to Mng blues uid 
altonative stists to the area, be- 
cause he thinks Hampton Roads 
needs to discover difToent types of 
music. 

'The market in this area is not as 
culturally attuned," said Rau 
'XTulturally bland - 1 think that de- 
scribes it" 

Rau established Albemarle Sound 
Productions (ASP), vi entertain- 
ment production and public rela- 
tions agency, in 1978. Since then, 
he has promoted several rhythm and 
blues artists, including 50 shows 



between August of 1989 and 
February of this year, he said. 

"Considering the number of great 
blues artists out there, it's a shame 
nrare people don't hear it. you're a 
convat." 

Rau was hosting "Blues at Sun- 
set," a blues show on WLPM-AM 
14S0 in Suffolk until the station 
replaced it with gospel music in 
April. 

"I'm trying very hard right now 
to And another ^tion to do blues," 
said Rau. 

He said that although 

he has had opportunities to 
move into j)ther maricets in other 
areas, he loefers to say in Virginia 
Beach and the Hampton Roads area, 
where he has be«« since 1968. 

"I love this area and would prefer 
to have an impact here, than in an- 



Survey 



D Continuad From Pag* i 

police department, he stated that he 
was misquoted and taken out of 
context 

• The papers do not repcwt the 
wealth of remedies available to 
citizens who are not h{^y with the 
outC(»ne of int^nal investigations, 
to include: ma^strate, common- 
wealth attorney, city attorney, cir- 
cuit court, FBI. Department of Jus- 
tice and civic lawsuit 

Following is a list of examples 
of hiai or irresponsible reporting 
demonstrated by the Pilot during 
the series. One was omitted from 
this list due to the fact that Baum 
couM not be reached to explain the 
meaning of the statements made, to 
where it could be understood by the 
reader. 

• The newspi4)ers have demon- 
strated bias by championing the 
cause of Melvin Moore, a man seen- 
looting during 1989 GreekfesL 

• Dennis Hmig testified before 
the Labor Day Review Commis- 
sion in 1989 that he observed no 
inappropriate force, yet in tiie 
newspapers where statements are 
not swcnn, the p^rs now label die 
department bnilal. 

• Dennis Hartig. when told by 
Chief Wall Uiat the man who struck 
Melvin Moore had been identified 
and that it wasn't newsworthy. The 
man was not a police officer. 

• Jerry Alley pdnted his edito- 
rial lett^ calling citizens to "report 
local police" for brutal incidents 
only two days into tiie series, while 
more objective citizens waited until 
die series was finished before re- 
sponding. 

• The newspapers failed to re- 
port the time period covered by 
their extensive search. Did tiiey 
compare percentages of dismissals 
to charges fw other types of cases? 
No. 

• Reporters felt it significant to 
compare number of physical arrests 
and summonses issued to number 
of officers mjured, but not to num- 
ber of "beaten" citizens, a much 
smalter percentage. 

■ • This newspapers "advcrtiod" 
for lawyers to take a class action 
suit. 

• The reporters begaq dieir re- 
search by addng the leading ques- 
tion "did anything unusual or 
upsetting happen when you were 
arrested?" ThiB^ton explained diat 
this is a leading question, when 
asked in court, aldiough die news- 
papa printed that it was lUM a lead- 
ing question in an introductory 
paragruih. 

• The newspapers failed to re- 
pen the reasons provided by die 
police department as to why many 
citizen cranplaints are not substan- 
tiated: Individuals who are arrested 
are frequentiy intoxicated and mis- 
taken about what actually occurred. 
Individuals want revenge agamst die 
officer. Individuals want a bargain- 
ing chip against tiieir own charges. 
Individuals are not aware of police 
rigtit^ and responsftUities. 

• The new^pers used die most 
negative and expletive statements 
for leadlines and sidebars in *xh 
st(»y. 

• Can die newspaper indepen- 
dendy verify diat each of die un- 
haj^y citizens diey spoke widi had 
IK) crimmal recofd or do they accqit 
s^-serving statements ta true? By 
state law, tte police department 
could not tell the reporters of die 
citizens' aiminal records. 

• The intwviews of Virginia 
BMch General per«»nel are luH 
rqxesentatives of die majority. Not 
all interviews woe laed. 

• In Sunday's vticle rqiort^s 
state diat Bill Martin was not 
drng^ widi fdony as^t. This is 
comet, and an exmple pf an (rfficer 
who &XS not st^k (m charges, ((X 
pile up multiple charges) since 
Martin was alre»!y cNu]^ widi re- 
sistii^ am». Additi(Nially, many 
of die assttilts apinst p<^ offi- 
ces are not felonies, ye the pifier 
aakes no diaaKticxi and leaves die 
impression tiut die only kind of 
verifiaUe usailt is felony anautt. 

• Reponen commoits in Sun- 
day's ulkfe itout dK Warzenskis 
reKl "(rflkial iMliffaen», institu- 
tion! b«mn ... ataxx plnse fcM^ 
juaice" we coamentvy «mI unjus- 



tified. 

• National research indicates 
diat the two most dangerous activi- 
ties a police officer can perform are 
traffic stops and domestic argu- 
ments, and many officer injuries 
occur in diese situations. Why isn't 
tfiis rqxMled. 

• The newspaper has not inter- 
viewed enough officers to make die 
bold allegation "piling on charges 
after a person has been beaten is a 
common tactic." (More commen- 
tary) 

• Hie newspaper indicts the de- 
partment by saying diere is a direct 
relationship between severity of 
beating and number of charges. The 
cause and effect is accurate, but the 
order is not. Why not mention die 
fact that the more criminal acts 
suspected, the more the arrested 
subject has to lose, and he can be 
more likely to resist. 

• Sunday's article shows a pho- 
tography of Tim Christian on 
crutches a result of an injury not 
caused by police, but to die casual 
reader, this would draw sympathy 
and appear to be related. 

t^ E)etective Sean Hoffman was 
interviewed by one of die reporters 
after diey had located a citizen who 
had been an^tcd. The detective told 
diem about the incident, but they 
chose not to print die interview. Is 
it. because the suspect pushed 
Hoffman through a plate glass 
win(h)w? 

• Officer Scott Stewart was in- 
terviewed by Beacon reporter Lynn 
Waltz regarding his arrest situation. 
He received an injury to his diumb 
diat has resulted in his forc^ re- 
tirement, and again die newspapers 
did not report die interview. Stew- 
art, who was attacked by a citizen 
with a shovel, did not retire and 
currentiy works for die police de- 
partment 

• Why didn't die reponen inter- 
view some of these officers widi 
"good reputations" before branding - 
die dei»rtment widi "widespread 
abuse" . . . 

t/ There are any numb^ of offi- 
cers on the department who would 
be happy to share with reporters 
(and may have told diem) that die 
amount of force used is partically 
determined by how much threat die 
officer feels, and how much assis- 
tance he has available. One officer 
against two suspects is in much 
more personal danger than an even 
mateh. 

• Chief Wall was interviewed 
by Holden and Hano- on February 
6, 1991. At the end of die inter- 
view, die reporters asked for a sec- 
ond interview, but never returned. 

• The newspapers stiated diat 
cops hardly get disciplined, dien 
contradicts itself by criticizing the 
discipline. 

• The reporters diKount die 210 
hours of human relations training 
detailed for them by Sgt. Nick 
Sitarski. These classes include 
communications, human relations, 
crisis intervention, and numerous 
odiers. Reporters extracted what 
diey felt was most useful for dieir 
article. They also failed to report 
die training hours released by die 
department just prior to Labor Day 
1991: 209 officers were trained in 
(ultural awareness, 50 officers were 
trained in stress management. 40 
officers were trained in mob psy- 
chology. Also in 1989 most of all 
of the officers sent to the Ocean- 
front were trained by Comprehen- 
sive Mental Health in defusing 
ccmflict 

• The reporters were told diat 
"combat" training included much 
more than actually shooting. 
Classroom instruction also covers 
civil liability, legal aspects of use 
of force, shoot/don't shoot exer- 
cises, etc. 

• Chief Wall has repeatedly told 
reporters that he will not tolerate 
any proven abuse of auth(xity on 
die pan of die officers. This nevw 
flowed up in die setkle. 

• The newspapers contradict 
themselves by stating ditt veterans 
make up for new "battle-ready" 
nxAia, and in die same article and 
say these rookies learn l^ habits 
from die "M guad." 

• The newq»pen fail»l to print 
die job (|^ficati<ms, which were 
povided to tfion. 



odier market," said die Kempsville 
High Schod f^uate. 

He has helped moA bKkstage at 
many local eveMs, such as Nor- 
folk's HarborfeM. Uie Elizabeth 
Rivo- Blues Festi^, "Night on die 
Town," among odiers. 

"I've always had an interest in 
music," said Rao. "I had a lot of 
opportunities when I was young, to 
^ backstage. I was what you call a 
fiiiled musician. I was never able to 
get into music because 1 wasn't 
good enough, so I got into it in a 
business sense." 

While Rau worked on his musi- 
cal promotions, he also started a 
cabinet-making business and related 
woodworks. He did contracts for 
sevwal private groups, including aii 
art galloy in Norfolk and die Adam 
Thoroughgood House on Parrish 
Lane. But recent problems in die 
economy made it difficult for Rau 
to pursue both business. He said 
that although he lost a great deal of 
money in the ventures, he has 
leam«l from his mistakes. 



Virginia Beach Sun, Wednesday. July 15, 1992 7 




Pubnc Notice 



3 



Mike Rau, and one of his pets. 



Auction: 1982 Ford Fairmont 
#5915 

Serial Number: #1FABP21B5- 
CK 199996 
Auction date: July 31, 1992 
Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy., Norfolk. Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves die right to Bid. 

29-5 
It7-15VBS 



Rau said diat because he is ad- 
dicted to acquiring knowledge and 
experience, he has developed a 
weakness for staying busy. 

"I'm a woricaholic," he said. "I 
have a problem getting myself 
overinvolved widi tilings. If I have 
free time, I have to find somediing 
else to do." 

As a result, he began doing vol- 
unteer work and helps out as a 
wildlife rehabilitator. He is getting 
ready to bring diree rescoed baby 
opossums back to homes in the 



wild, after already setting two odi- 
ers out pn dieir own. 

"I'm a critter lover." Rau said. 

When he's not tending to the 
opossums, he spends time widi his 
parrot. Thor, »id his 15-year-old 
dog. Goober, who he affectionately 
describes as a mutt. 

Until Rau finds a new outiet, he 
will continue to put his energy and 
efforts into his politics, music, an- 
imals and occasionally do some 
woodwork. 



Public Notice 



Auction: 1983 Olds Firenza 
#5766 

Serial Number: #1G3AC6907- 
DK304535 

Auction date: July 30. 1992 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy.. Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 

D Continued On Page 8 



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> BOY, MURRAY A SUNBEAM TO 

NAMEJUSTAFEWI 
MANUmCTUmirtWAlMANTin I. 
VAUD ON ALL APMJCABLI mMBll 



EVERY PRICE 

CUT 25% 

Rwry H wwjnrt o^ wit to* d lsco uK ad a% 
M trW fw^Mtn^ ffwn ttMMs MfNtfy mMtod down! 
OuHNttMlknlMteMediontand. 
I MB frtufiM. d^MripM, ralndivcflts. nvfr. coupons, ^ 
•r. CWMn dlHOuiM or RoMt Sala Piloo 
OuwmM. SoiTK no paraoml ehodw. 

ALL SALES FINAL! 

'Hw Mm* OtparMMM It NOT gohig out ol 
buataM* bill » paMctpMIng In IM* t^. 



■.t 



SHOP REGULAR STORE HOURS... HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION! 



ONLY AT THESE SELECTED STORES 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

Arrowl^ad Plaza Shopping Center 
5612 Princess Anne ^toad 

rrS BUSINESS-AS-USUAL AT OTHER ROSES DISCOUNT STORES 



SALE CONDUCTED BY NASSI-BERNSTEIN COMPANY INC. AS AGENT 



I 



Hi/ 



^H^mmmi 



^^«niW 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmumgaKmamumfum&m 



i Vintink Btach Son. Wednesday. July 15. 1992 



OpntkMiMinomPig«7 



saves die right lo Bid. 



29-6 
It7-15VBS 



PuMcNoHc* 



OFFICE OF THE COMMIS- 
SIONER OF ACCOUNTS 

CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
'CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH. 
iVmOINIA 

JULY 8. 1992 

JOHN M. HODGSON. DE- 
CEASED 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64.1-171, as 
amotded. Code of Virginia, that the 
{undersigned Commissioner of Ac- 
Icounts, having been requested by 
jCrestar Bank and D6rothy May 
iHodgson, Co-Executors of the Es- 
tate of John M. Hodgson, deceased, 
has appointed the 22nd day of July, 
1991. at 3:00 P.M.. at 129 South 
Great Neck Road, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23454, as the time and 
place for receiving proof of debts 



and tamnds against the decedott or 
his estate. 
Stanley A. Phillips, 
Commission^' of Accounts 

29-7 
It7-1SVBS 

i PubMc Nolic» 

OFFICE OF THE COMMIS- 
SIONER OF ACOXJNTS 

CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, 
VIRGINIA 

JULY 8, 1992 

CARL E. BAILEY, JR., DE- 
CEASED 

NOTICE is ho'eby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64.1-171, as 
amended. Code of Virginia, that the 
undersigned Commissioner of Ac- 
counts, having been requested by 
Cabell C. Mercer, Executor of the 
Estate of Carl E. Bailey, Jr., de- 
ceased, has ^^inted the 22nd day 
of July, 1991, at 3:00 P.M., at 129 
South Great Neck Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 23454, as the time 



~ uid pl^e for receiving proof of . 
(tebts and demaids trains the dece- 
dent or his e^tte. 
Stanley A. Phillips, 
Commissoner of Accounts 

29-8 
It7-15VBS 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

PROPOSED HIGHWAY PROJECT 

SOUTH PLAZA TRAIL 

CITY OF VIRGINU BEACH 

All interested persons are advised that the Virginia De- 
partment of Transportation is hereby indicating its willing- 
ness to hold a Combined Location and Design Public Hearing 
concerning the jMtqwsed extension of South Plaza TWl from 
the intersection of Princess Anne Road (Route 165) to the 
intersection of South Independence Boulevard in the City of 
Virgiiiia Beach. 

Maps, drawings, and other information concerning the 
proposed project are available for public review in the De- 
partment of Transportation's District Office located at 1700 
North Main Street in the Qty of Suffolk, and iji its Residency 
Office located at 1992 South Military Highway in the Qty of 
Chesapeake. 

Any interested citizen from the communities affected by 
this proposal may request that a Public Hearing be held by 
sending a written request to Mr. P.D. Gribok, Resident 
Engineer, Virginia Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 
1366, Chesapeake, Virginia 23327, on or before July 24, 
1992. In the event such a request is received, a further notice 
of the time and place of the hearing will be posted. 



Vhht 



Virginia Department of iFansportatlon 



Job Des. 121-92A -Rtes. 621 & 803 -Lm Co. 
Drainage & Asphalt S.T. Pave. 



-2.4 Mi. L.S. Grading. 



Job Des. 123-92A -Rte. 687 -Madison Co. -0.423 Mi. Grading, Drain- 
age, Asphah Cone. Pave. & Incids. 

Job Des. 124-92A -Rte. 265 -Pittsylvania Co. -Constr. 8 Brs. 

Job Des. 125-92A -Rtes. 695 -Smyth Co. -0.044 Mi. L.S. Grading. 
Drainage. Asphalt S.T. Pave. & 2 Brs. <MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 126-92A -Commuter Parking Lot -Stafford Co. -Grading, 
Drainage, Asphalt Cone. Pave.. Incids. & Lighting 

Job Des. 1 27-92A -Rte. 61 3 -Surry Co. -Drainage Str. at Bailey Branch 
(MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 128-92A -Rte. 667 -Tazewell Co. -2.2 Mi. L.S. Grading. 
Draini^je « AaphaM S.T. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 129-92A Rte. 1030 -Tazewell Co. -0.915 Mi. L.S. Grading, 
Drainme « Asphalt Cone. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATK>N) 

Job Oes. 130-92A - Port Republic Rd. -City of Harrisonburg -0.43 Mi. 
Gr«fing. Drainage, Asphalt Cone. Pave., Utilities, Signals & Incids. 

The DepartmeiN assures compliance with Title VI requirements of 
non-discrimlnation in all activities pursuant to this advertisement. 

NOTE: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE CONTRACT 
ENGINEER. 



NOTIFICATION TO BIDDERS 

Sealed BkJs will be received at the Virginia Department of 
Transportation, Central Office Auditorium, 1221 E. Broad St.; 
the Plan Rm., 12th Floor, Annex BIdg., 1401 E. Broad St.; and 
the parking lot Security Sta., located between the Highway 
BIdg., 1221 E. Broad St., and the newly renovated Highway 
BIdg., 1201 E. Broad St., Richmond, Va., until 10 A.M., EDT, 
Wednesday, July 29. 1992, and will be opened in the Central 
Office Auditorium, 1221 E. Broad St., Richmond, Va.. for the 
constnjction of: 

Job Des. 11 2-92A -Rte. 654 (Barracks Rd.) -Albermarle Co. -0.269 Mi. 
Grading, Drainage, Asphatt Cone. Pave., Inckls. & Signals 

Job. Des. 113-92A -Rte. 604 -Buchanan Co. -0.8 Mi. L.S. Grading, 
Drainage & Asphalt Cone. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job. Des. 114-92A -Rte. 616 -Buchanan Co. -0.7 Mi. LS. Grading, 
Drainiqe & Asp^lt Cone. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job. Des. 1 1 5-92A -Rte. 61 8 -Charles City Co. -1 .227 Mi. L.S. Grading, 
Drainage 8. Asphalt S.T. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 116-92A -Rte. 661 -Dickenson Co. -0.14 Mi. L.S. Grading, 
Drainage & Asphalt Cone. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 1 17-92A -Rte. 619 -Dinwiddle Co. -0.945 Ml. L.S. Grading, 
Drainage & Asphalt Cone. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 118-92A -Rta. 601 -Fluvanna Co. -0.319 Mi. Grading, 
Drainage, Asphalt Cone. Pave. & Drainage Str. (MINIMUM 
PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 1 19-92A -GlenskJe Dr. -Henrico Co. -Turn Lanes, Retaining 
Walls & Signs (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 1 20-92A -Rte. 600 -Isle of Wight Co. -6.605 Mi. L.S. Grading. 
Drainage I. Asphalt Cone. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 



PuMcNoNc* 



Take nodcc that on 07/16/92, at 
10:00 AM, at the premises of 4747 
Shore Drive, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, the undosigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash, reserving 
unto itself, the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicle. 

1985 Chevtolet Astro Van 

Serial #1GCDM15N8FB1 10369 

BAYSIDE MOTORS 

29.3 
It7-15VBS 



PubOc None* 



Take notice that on 07/16/92, at 
10:00 AM, at the premiss of 4747 
Shore Drive, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, the undersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash, reserving 
unto itself, the right to bid, the 
following motK' vehicle. 

1983 BUICK RIVIERA 

Serial #1G4AZ5740DE407269 

BAYSIDE MOTORS 

29-4 
It7-15VBS 



PubiicNotic* 



Auction: 1982 Pontiac J2000 
#5897 

Serial Number: #1G2AB69G3- 
CK506193 

Auction date: July 29, 1992 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy., Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right to Bid. 

29-1 
It7-15VBS 



[ 



ruHcNpllc* 



] 



Auction: 1981 Olds Cutlass 



#5923 

Serial Number: #2Q3AR47A3- 
B2408882 

Auction date: July 29, 1992 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Cwnpany, 7000 N, Military 
Hwy.. Norfolk. Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
xrves the right to Bid. 

29-2 
lt7.15VBS 

I PubBc Notlc» ^ 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 29th day of JUNE, 
1992. 

Billy Wayne Wallace. Jr. Plain- 
tiff, against Donna Darlene Dillon 
Wallace. Defendant 

Docket #CH92-1378 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtan a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upcsi the grounds of one 
year separaticm. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defendant is 
not a resident of die State of Vir- 
ginia, the last known post office 
address being P.O. Box 701, Cot- 
ton Valley, LA. It is ordered that 
Donna Darlene Dillon Wallace do 
appear on or before die 19th of Au- 
gust, 1992, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her interest in 
this suit. 

It isJiirdier Ordered that a copy of 
this Order be published once each 
we^ for four successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy-r-Tcste: 

J. Curtis Frait. Clerk 

By: Raymond J. Bjorkman. D.C. 

LeeAnn N. Bam^, p.q. 

11101 Warwick Boulevard 

Newport News. Virginia 23601 

27-7 
4lt.22VBS 



Pick Up The Virginia Beach Sun 
At Any Of These Locations: 



Dr.VMao 

Aragona Shopping Center 

Open House Diner 
309 Aragona Boulevard 

^per Fresh 
Rosemont Road 

The Sun Building 

138 South Rosemont Road 

Marlcetpbce 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Peoples Drug Store 

Hilltop 

Revco 

Hilltop 

Virginia BcMsh 
General Hospital 

First Colonial Road 

Heat's Sub Shop 
Great Neck Vill^je 

Super Fresh 

Hilltop Plaza 

Holiday Food Store 

General Booth Boulevard 

Holiday Inn Park 

General Booth Boulevard 

Thomas Murphy 

1000 Pacific Avenue 

17th Street Surf Shop 

Pacific Avenue 

Sir Afton Inn 

Mediterranean Avenue 

Aquarius Motel 

1 909 Atlantk: Avenue 

Comfort Inn 

2015 Atlantic Avenue 

Ocean Holiday 

25th and Atlantic Avenue 

Post Off kit 

Atlantic Avenue 

Ingram miarmaey 

207 25th Street 

l^lncess Anne Motel 

25th and Atlantic Avenue 

Seahawk MotM 

26th and Oceanfront 

The Boardwalk inn 
2604 Atlantic Avenue 

Seagun Motel 

27lh and Atlantk: Avenue 

Vking Motel 
2700Ms)tk;AvwitM 
MardiOrae Motel 



2802 Atlantk: Avenue 

Oceanfront Inn 

27th and Atlantk: Avenue 

Days Inn 

Atlantk: Avenue 

Sea Vacationer 

34th and Atlantic Avenue 

■ BehredereReaort Motel 

30th and Atlantk: Avenue 

Wafflo't'n Things 

Comer of Padfk; Avenue 
and Laskin Road 

Farm Fresh 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Phar-Mor 

1944 Laskin Road 

Texaco Food Mart 

1912 Laskin Road 

Peoples Drug Store 

980 Laskin Road 

The Beach Pub 
1001 Laskin Road 

Shape's Saton 

1065 Laskin Ro»J 

Bek) Supermarket 

London Bridge 

HIIKop torn 
1284 Laskin Road 

Farm Freeh 
Laskin Road 

Marketplace 

Laskin Ro^ 

FoodLkMi 

OutltfMaO 



Chamber of Conmwrce 

Pembroke M«yi parking bt 

Annabelle's 

Pembroke Mall 

FoodLton 

Perifibioke Mall 

Farm Fresh 

Independence Boulevard 

PMqilea Drug Store 

Indepenoence Boulevard 

Belo 

Northampton Bou^ard 

CrkAetbMi 

Northampton Boulevard 

FoodUon 

Newtown Road at Baker Road 



The Vli^nla Beach Sun 

For Home Delivery, News Or Advertising, 
Can 486-3430 




BLANKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published In 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $175. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $6.00 per word.) 

Call 547-4571 for Classified Representetive 



WOLFF TANNING BEDS -New InghouM. Cill RMort S«lM Inter- Ford Trucks - All bnnd n*w S2'i 
CoRinwrcM -Ham* Unttt From nuHlon loll Iroa hotlln* t-SOO-423- caff tor ilacMrylnvolcoprtc* quota 
|1B8.00.Lanp«-Latlont-A0CM«o- 8887. 1-aOO-8eS-9S7S. 

riM, Manthijr Ptjrnwitt Low at 

•18«I.CillTod<vFREENEWCokx SInglo drIvM cm EARN UP TO WATERFRONT -L^vOatton.VA. 
Catalog. 1-<()0-2284282. 33«PERMILE.OurhighvolurTMol Larga lot. 1 hrt, toulh o< Rldimond. 

avsrdlnwiilanal.tlaltiad,drDp-d«ck Easy scoass from I-8S, 1-86 1 US 
LAKE QASTON VAWC 360 milaa tralght sniblas you lo aarn Ihasa 88. NaaiQoH* Uadleal.Fln««dng. 
shorallna-OvarlOOMMrftanlloM. lopwagss.EXTRAPAYIoripaclal 804-4a8-8320. 
SPECIAL SUMMER SALE. FREE sarv leas msans you maka avan 

LAKE MAP, Bvyars QuMa. CaW nwamonaylANDRECEIVEDAILV FREE SAMPLEIII Naw waIgM tos* 
wmaTanglawoadRaaNy.80«-836- EAmiNQSPROTECTIONIOurnaw producti 'WILLPOWER IN A 
2204. 1-800-338-8818. Boi 116 aarnlngs plan snsuras your lamNy BOTTLE~BurMlat«iMtaiMngstllll 
Bracay, VA 23918. wilt racalva i slaidy, wsakly In- Losa * pound a dqril CaH now, 

coma as long as your availabia tor Hmllad supply, (303) 826-1833. 
FRIENDLY HOME PARTIES has work. TRISM SPECIALIZED CAR- 

apanlngsfordamonalraKirt.Nocasn RIERS. 1-80O-S68-1851. WEIQHT LOSS QUARANTEB) ■ 

hwastmanl. Nosarvlcactiarga. High Slopa nUlars, bingan, amoflonal 

oonmlaalofl and hostass awards. Orlvar Mams can EARN UP TO aal«n.|21.96. WMavaitatyofdlat 
Two calakigs, ovar 600 Hams. Call 44.5* PER MLE. Our high voluma pHk avallsbla. CaR National Phar- 
1-800486-4878. d commarclal and govammanl maoauUcal lor krformallon. 800-728- 

Iralghlanablasquallliaddriyarlaaa* 3807.C.04.'sATC<ttcardsaacaplad. 
MyrtlaBaach RESORT VACATION to aarn tha bast wigss. MINIMUM 

RENTALS -Ocsanfronl condos, MILEAGE GUARANTEE AND Laarn Bookkaaplng/Accountlng. 
housakaaplnglndudad. Indoor/out- MUCHMOREIYou'Hbapaldraulad Spadal-UsarFrland^HoniaSMdy 
door pools, whirlpools, saunas, mllas lor daslgnatad eommodHlaa Program. Ovaf 80,000 studants 
llgMadtannlscour(s,punkiggraana. and driva only lata-msdaLsaMMa- trabwd suooaaahi^r. Two calcula- 
QoRpackagasavalMsla. Fraabro- aqulppad convanttonals lor lonlfldudadwllhcoursa.Fra•Ca- 
ehura:1■800-448■S6S3. Amartoa's oMast and largast muni- raar LItaratura. l-aoo- 362-7070 

lions haular. Ona yaar OTR and Oapl. AH738. 
DONATE YOUR CAR. Truck, COLraquMid.1-a00-28»47eS.TRI- 

Mptorhoma. Boat, Rsal Estata STATE MOTOR TRANSIT CO. TrvckDrlvars-1yr.axp.--uplo.28/ 
Stanps. Coins. Colaclt)las.loFoun- MoQII Spaclal Sarvlcas. mL lo start. Choosa van or Hal. 

dallon Sarving tha Blind I.R.S. tax TuWon-lraa training lor thosa w/no 

daductUa, FREE TOWING: NEED AMERICAN RETIREMENTHOMES aap.Or«albanaMs.CallPoolaTnick 
NOT RUN 1-800-326-8022. -$1,000*. Indudas room, board. LIna 1-800-SS3-B443. Dapt. W-68. 

ullMiaa. 24 hr. nursa asslstad anv 
ORIVERS: START 24 CENTS -26 bulalory/non-tmbulatory care. Laam Gunsmllhing -RHIas, Shot- 
CENTS. EARN TO 30 CENTS. Chartottasvllla. Lsxington, Norfolk. guna,Plstols.Bacon)aaxpa<lBlhlgh- 
HOME REGULARLY, FREE MEDI- VA Baach, Clllton Forgo, Ernporia, prolH rapairs. FuH and pan lima 
CAL/DENTAL. RETIREMENT, South Hill, Tappahannock, Ports- opportunlllas. Prolasslonal laval 
81.000 TARP PAY, SAFETY BO- mouth, Gloucastar, VA., also horn* study. FraalilarMura. 1-800- 
NUS, CONVENTIONALS. RE- Pansacola. FL. 1-800-88B-6637. 382-7070. Dopl. QH73S. 
QUIRE 23 YRS 8 1 YR OTR. 

HORNAOYTRUCKLINE t-800-343- DrKrars - Do you want baltar pay? BacwnaaVMarlnaryAaslatanl/Anl- 
7869. Do you want mora mllas? Than call mal Cara SpadaHst HorM Study. 

J.B.HUNT: t-800-2JB-HUNT EOE/ Turn your k>va ol animals Into an 
A WONDERFUL FAMILY EXPERI- Subjact lo drug scraan. axelllrig caraar. Fraa Fad-llllad Lk- 

ENCE. Scandinavian. Europaan. aralura. 1-800-362-7070. Dapt, 

South Amarican, Japanaaa high SPAS-SPAS-SPAS-Ralax,soan* CH73S. 
school axchanga sludsnls arriving anhrllls pain, 365 day vacation. 

kl AugusL Bacoma a host lamlly/ Factory diraci, sava 81,000's on PHYSICIANOPPORTUNITY-Aprl- 
Amarksan IntarcuNural Studant Ex- your spa. Quality 8 dapandabilHy mary cara mukl-spadallty group 
changa. CaH Irana (804) 746-8418 guarantaad. Fraa brochuras. CHI praoikx with 3 kxulona hi Rich- 
or 1-800-SI8LINQ. 208-486-7919. mond, Virginia, Is soaking quaHlad 

Physicians In lamiiy praodoa, IMai- 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR For iha naxt 30 days Wholasala nal madiiNno and padMrka. Com- 
THE SELF-EMPLOYED. Finally - Log Homo Manulaolurar Discount- pallthra salary and bonus; compra- 
AHordabla,Cast-EHactlvaHospHal lngPacka8asupioS0%ManyStylaar hanalva banallts: ganarous vaca- 
Insuranca', Sail Empioyad/Smail Matarlals. Buy now whiia Intarsst tlon and CME banaflla: strong ad- 
Buslnsss«s.A00ITIONAL140ban- ratas ara k)W. 1403-766-2208. mkilatrationandsolklllnanclalaup- 
alltsiCALLTOOAY1 1-800428^72 port; raMonriilaappoinlmant toad; 

('UndanwrHar PFL LIFE) Truck Drhrars - 82.000 sign-on bo- axcaNam ladWlaa. H you ara inWr- 

nus for safa, quaL Drivars wfOTR astad In this pracUea opiwrtunky, 
WE BUY MORTGAGES And Trust axp. Tuttk>n-fraa training tor Inaxp. caH orwrHa: Richmond Haalth Ca^ 
Daads.Dk) You Sail Proparty7Ra- COM TRAILS Inc.. 1-800-788-8080. Group, tOOO Bouidars Parkway, 
calving Paymants? Why Waltl Fast Dapt. A-B3. Rkihmond, VA 23225. (804) 323- 

Caah Ncwrl Any Stza -NallorMrida. 7578. EOE. 

QraalPricaa. Call 1-8004S»CA8H AVIATION MAINTENANCE - Train- 

(2274). Mongagaa Buyars ol kig. FAA CartHlad -Financial AkI DECK TOP BOATHOUSE w/holst 
Amarlea. Navy Tullton Assist t Vatarans on 1/2 acra. Fully rip-rappad shora 

BanalHs Approvad-Plscamant As- line. Raady for your boat on SmUh 
WHITEWATER RAFTINQ, Wast sislanca. RICE AVIATION -5202 Mtn. $69,800. WaikarOavalopmwit 
Virginias Naw and Qaulay.Rh«rs. W. MUitary Hwy. Hangar 7 Chasa- 1-B0O-377-0470. Ownar Agaol. 
July tpsciils. Call today lor fraa paaka, VA. 23321 (804)465-2813. 

brochura -1-800-633-RAFT. DriH- FastCashl$1,O00lo$3S0,000hlgh 

A-BII,lnc.,P.O.Box885,Fayaltavns, HAPPY JACK TABLICKS: Prsvant risk landars, no mpUcatlon faa, no 
WV 25840. fiau Mothar Nature's way without bad cradk. Call loll fraa 24 hours 1- 

pasttoldes. ChawaUa ( nutrktous 800-862-7744. $1.95 i>ar minula 
QolacairpgroundnMmbarshipor tablal.ForDogs8Catt.AtSOUTH- avaraoacaa2minutaa.Kranimars, 
llmashara? Wa-H Mka It. Amark:a's ERN STATES. P.O. Box 280 Fort Laa, NJ 07024, 

most succaasfuirasonrasala dear- 201-944-1846. 



^l^l^iOJf^RE-ROOFING SALE 

. „ Corrugated Asphalt Roofing 

' Fast, easy installation 



• Goes directly over old roof 

• Won't rust or corrode 

• Reduces noise 

• Provides added insulation 

• Lifetime limited warranty 

.49* $39.86* 

48"X79" ^ Per Mat. 

Sheet Square 

'WHITE "BROWN -RED BLACK 
PRAY GREEN TAN BLUE 

• IN STOCK COLORS 
At least 32 square* in stock 



$10 




Southern States 



1764 S. Military Hwy. 

Chesapeake, VA 23320 

804-420-2841 



ADP 



AuTOBi^ATic Data Processing 

Ojvortunlties for individuals committed to a career in 
Sales. 

Whether you are a recent college graduate or just some- 
one who is ready to take control of their own Income 
potential, we are interested in you. 

ADP Is a $1.9 billion company whose growth rate has 
consistently averaged 15% - 20% per year for thirty plus 
years. We seek individuals who are college graduates with 
an intense desire to challenge themselves and are commit- 
ted to a sales career. You t>ring us your detennination and 
disciplined Work ethic and we wiH teach you the secrets to a 
successful sales career including: 

♦ Phone Canvassing 

♦ Cold Calling 

♦ Networking 

♦ Territory Manggement 

♦ Helping tjusiness improve their bottom line 
and efficiency 

If you are a self-motivated individual that has a demon- 
strated aWllty to le^ and persuade people, then you qualify. 

Compensation includes base saisay, ownmisslons, car 
alkwanc*. full benefits and excellent ow»ortunlties for ad- 
vancement. Call Steve Samo at (800) 729-6033 and/or send 
your resume via facsimile to his attention at (41 0) 583-8577. | 



Virginia Beach Sun, Wednesday. July 15. 1992 9 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Call Sharon today^ to place 
your ad in the classifieds. 

547-4571 




CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PIRSONAL 
RATES 

Itime 
2 times 
4 times 



20 Words 
•rl«M 

$ 7.50 
$ 13.50 
$ 22.50 



AddHional 
words 

.35 

.70 

f.40 



Run your personal Classified Ad four times for only $22.50. You 
can cancel your ad at any time. 

Ail Classified Ads run in three newspapers (The Virginia Bedch Sun, The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additional charge. 



Please print Clearly using only one word per box. 














/ 


























20 words 



Run my personal ad for . 
Payment Is enclosed $ . 



Issues. 



. Mak« elMck payaH* to Byariy Publleatlom 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327. Chesapeaka, Va. 23327 

Name 

Address • 

City ^ 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 

PERSONAL AOS muu b* placid by pri- 
v«M Indlvidutlt. Comrrardtl and buil- 
nwi raliMd idi do not quilHy lor 2-tlmi 
and 4-tlma parsonal ralas. 



COMB INATION RATE : Run ihK urn* pcnonal ad In any 
olhtr Byarty Publication! nmnpapar lor an additional $3 
on* tim*, is two timu, $7 tour llrnat. Ntwipapara In 
Franklin, Ennporla, Lawranctvilie, OInwIddIa and Palan- 
burg. Call 547-4671 lor dataik. | 



ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



TELEPHONE 

Solid oak, general store wall-type 
crank phone. Original fixtures. $300. 
Call 853-2096. 

10,000 SO. FT. FURNITURE- 
GUSS-CLOCKS-DOLLS-MUCH 
MUCH MORE. OPEN 7 DAYS. 10- 
5. 1804 GRANBY ST. 622-0905. 



SEIZED VEHICLES BY DEA, FBI 
and U.S. CUSTOMS. Low as $100. 
CADILLACS, GM, BMS's, 
MERCEDES, PORCHES, FORDS. 
CALL 1-315-733-8512 Ext. R-486. 

If you have something you want to 
sell, let the classifieds do it for you. 
Call 547-4571 today. 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 



BUILDING/REMODELING 



LAWN MAINTENANCE 



CHELSEA CONSTRUCTION CO. 
Custom finished carpentry, interior 
trim, decks, fences, cabinets, enter- 
tainment centers. 427-9169 Gregg. 



G ft T LAWN MAINTENANCE 

The ultimate in lawn care. Lbensed 
& insured. 471-9616. 



CARPET SERVICE 



MOVING & HAULING 



CARPET CLEANING 

No gimmicks, $17 50 per room Spot 
iimenideodorizer mcludoa 

■ .'■.,'■:, closets, baths, 1/2 pncu 

853-7994 

Pro(t)5i;onjl Steam Cleaning Servica 



BOYD MOVING COMPANY 

Short notice, pick-up, delivery 
servce. We accept appliances, fur- 
niture and tools toward the cost of 
move. Call Davki at 855-2792. 

CHESSON TRANSFER 

Home & office moving I Insured. 
Reasonable rates. 545-1793. 



CLEANING 



MOM'S CLEANING 

Houses, empty houses, office 

cleaning & apartments. Reasonable 

rates. Weekly, bi-weekly & monthly. 

Call 464-2639. Leave msg. 

HAKE YOUR HOUSE SPARKLE 

Kelly's Cleaning Servce. Located 
near ODU. 489-2746. ' 

HUSBANDS ONLYII 
If mom's happy, everyone's happy, 
right? Treat her to a sparkling clean 
home. Reasonable, rates, 
dependable, references. Call 483- 
3534. 

HOUSECLEANING 
DependaA>le, honest hard worker. 
Windows, laundry, ironing. 
Reasonable rates. Free estimates 
and references. Call 587-1802. 



PAINTING & DECORATING 



COLOR PRIDE PAINTING CO. 

421-7007 

Before you make that final decision, 

let our customers speak to you by 

our reference list. Free estimates. 

Ray's Painting 
Free Estimates 

Quality work, interior, exterior, 
residential & commercial. Call day or 
night 853-3531. 



PLUMBING 



GENERAL REPAIRS 



F ft D SMALL a URQE JOBS 

Drywalls, finishing, painting, mason- 
ry repairs, roofs. Specialize in 
ded^s. Remodeling of all types. Call 
464-2639. AA fw Dale. Leave msg 
on mKhine. 



24 HOUR PLUMBING SERVICE. 
SERVING ALL PARTS OF VA. 
BEACH. 7 DAYS A WEEK. Water 
heaters repl»^. Leaks repaired. 
Gas lines and drain cleaning. 
Remodeling and new house 
plumbing. Many years of 
experience. Jim Maybee, state 
registered Master Plumber. 340- 
0492 anytimel (Va. Beach only) 



PROF-SERVICES 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



RESUMES 

Fast, professional servlM. Job 
search assistance. Alpha 
Intemattonal. 490-7817. 



CLEAfWIQ SERVICE ONLY 

ENVIRONMENTAUY SAFE 

PR0DUC19USED 

ResWential/commercial/move-ins. 
outs/one time. Senior citizen/military 
dtecounts. A-0 Kay bonded ctoan- 
Ing senrice. 430-44<». 

KrrrSFLO<»HRVICE 

Oak itoon installed, sanding ft 
finishing. All types of home 
improvements. 55 yews exp. 488- 
6985. 



TREE SERVICE 



ACTION TREE SERVICE 

Since 1965. Complete servk:^. 
LJnnsed, insurad. Free estimates. 
Firewood. Tim Taytor. 399-6588. 



Classifieds Worttll 

Call 547-4571 
To Place Your Ad. 



To place your ad In 

the classifieds, call 

Sharon today! 

547-4571 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



NO CREDIT CHECK 
'91 GEO STORM-Down payment & 
assume payments. Call 498-2121. 

CAMARO PARTS-1979-Hood 
scoop for Z28, $40; left ft right 
doors, $75 each; rear\ window 
touvor, $40; left ft right tail lights. 
$25 each. Radiator for 350 engine, 
$60. All in excellent conditkin. Call 
Don at 486-1348. 



BUS. OPPORTUNITIES 



BUS. PROP/SALE 



COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS in 
downtown Portsmouth and 
Churchland. Call 399-8390, 484- 
1275 or 399-3298. Owner/Agent. 

'Auto Repair, Beach $$ Maker 

* Paint ft Body Shop - Woni LastI 

* Hot Dog Shop, $4,500 Gets You 

In. 
KENNY 490-3505 

MSB. Inc. 

URRY'S COOKIES 

at Waterside Shopping Center. 
Priced for quick sale, only $35,000. 
Call 627-7278 for Info. 



CHILD CARE 



CHILDCARE-SHERWOOD 
FOREST/COLEMAN PLACE area. 
Days/nights. Weekends and drop- 
ins. Call 855-2605. 

DOUGLAS PARK AREA 

Child care in my home. Ex- 
perienced head teacher in day care. 
Preschool children accepted. USDA 
meals. 397-8973. 

CHILD CARE/NANIES-Family 
homes. Exp'd. Own car. Salary 
$5.00 to $6.00/hr. NO FEE. Call 
467-1644. 

KEMPSVILLE-Responsible mom. 
USDA. Non-smoker. Full-time. $60 
week. Part-time, hourly. 474-2485. 

HOME CHILD CARE PROVIDER 
STRIVING TO HELP THE 
WORKING PARENT 
Academic programs for all ages 2 1/ 
2 to school age. Ciriculum-Primary 
through school ages uses ABEKA. 
The hours are: 6 a.m. - 8 p.m. 545- 
8163. _^ 

CHESAPEAKE 
BABYSIT-NON-SMOKING CHRIS- 
TIAN HOME. Full/part-time. Drop- 
ins wekx>me. Fenced in yard with 
swingset. Snacks provided. 
Reasonable rates. 545-3800. 



CLOTHING 



WEDDING GOWN-White. full- 
length, short sleeves, satin w/ 
beaded sequins. $300 or best offer. 
Call 471-3610. 



COMPUTER/EQUIPMENT 



LOOKING FOR A COMPUTER? 
Call us for the best prtees on IBM 
compatbles. This month's special 
386-33 DX $1,349. COMPUTER 
BUSINESS SERVICE. 481-7586. 

COMPUTER-UPGRADES 386-40, 
$290. RAM $39.00 PER MEG, com- 
plete 386-40DX System. $1,500-4 
MB RAM. 120 MEG HD, High RES 
SVGA Warranty. 42A-06SB. 



FLEA MARKETS 



MARYS FLEA MARKET-Rent a 
tdble at Mary's Flea Market. Extra 
large tables. 983 Lynnhaven Pkwy., 
Lynnhaven Plaza. 468-2519. First 
10 customers receive a free lottery 
tteket. 



HELP WANTED 



EASY WORK. EXCELLENT PAY. 
AssemUe products at home. CaN toll 
free 1-W0-487-5568, ext. 76M. 



Best Fan 



NORRXK 
TO 

Round Trip TOKYO 

J/^AN TMVEL $eHVICe, IMC 

1-800-822-3336 



HELP WANTED 



SERVPRO Cleaning & Restoratton 
Franchise. 34 K Complete! Join the 
best team. Call 800-826-9586. 

CRAFTERS WANTED-For a new 
store opening July 15 in Virginia 
Beach. For more informatk>n call 
463-5899. 

$150,000+ RANGE 
Executive needed to wlminister es- 
tablished marketing program. In- 
vestment of $32,000 is required. 
Everything is provkled. This is not a 
franchise. For a confidential inter- 
view call 

800-245-6224 



HOBBIES 



STERUNG MEADOWS FARM 

Quality horses, priced to sell. Indoor 
and outdoor riding arena's. Erqlish 
and Western riding lessons 
av^lable. Boarding, full-care facility. 
471-2133. 



HOMES FOR SALE 



INVEST IN WUR FUTURE NOWl 
FHA/HUD/VA government homes 
all areas. Low down. Great interest 
rates. Special Incentives. Call Al 
Neely, Specialist. 456-9500, Realty 
Executives. 

PUNGO-3 yr. old house on U 
acres, pool * many extrasi 
$138.900.721-^65. 

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, VA-3 
bedroom ranch, 1 1/2 bath, 
enclosed porch, full cellar, central 
air, washer ft dryer, 2 1/2 acres, 
workshop, 2 car garage, 2 out- 
bulMings. above ground swhnming 
pool, small orchard ft garden. Taxes 
about $300. $98,500. 804-736- 
8012. 

FAIRFIELD-Condo. $64,500. Great 
buy. 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 
Sr^jlaca. Cafl 496-1104 weekdi^s. 
496-27^ we^tands. 



S&CnOUZSWtfffED 



iHST/arrcKmpidfart 

Afl ktada. wa eenc M you. 



VENDING/LOCAL 

$2 - $5,000 per month 

possible. Buy now &nxi 

grow rich. 

1-800-723-7800 



Ll\m PSYCHIC COUNSELINQ 

Tarot RMdings • Asfrology • Look Into Vow Futuro 

1^00-^4-1444 $1.79p«rmlniilB 



1-800-955-9^ MoJCXi. 



IB* 



INSTRUCTION 



MARKETINQ/OPINION 
RESEARCH firm seeks participants 
for short dlMusskm grou|M to share 
likes and dislikes about various 
products and services. Such 
research helps business and 
government leaders respond to the 
public's needs. If interested. Call 
Harriet, iNFOCUS Group Sen/k^s, 

490-1351. 

Federal government is hiring, from 
$16,000 to $62,(K}0 per year. Arhaz- 
ing 24 hr. recorded message 
reveals details. 804-925-1044, ext. 
ire, including Sundays.^ 

JOB SEEKERS-Construction 
workers needed. All phases. 1-800- 
330-93^. No fee. IRC, Inc. 

AUTO SALES PEOPLE 
THERE IS ANOTHER UFEi 

You can have more freedom, mud» 
higher commission ft real growth 
opportunity. All this ft more selling a 
product that is easier to sell at less 
than 1/2 the prk:e of a car. I know, I 
sold cars too. Call Bob Foreman 
490-2422. 

SALES REPRESENTATIVE ' 

An authorized ATftT security sys- 
tems dealer, boated In Hampton, 
seeks professional, ambitious, 
career-minded individuals im- 
mediately to work southside 
territory. Opportunity to advance into 
management and grow with young 
firm. Contact Ray Baker 62S-0371 . 

AIRLINE CREW 
TO $10 HOUR 

Will train. 461-1 148. Jobs Plus. Job 
listing servloa. Only $40 fee. 

SALES REP 

National oo. seeks sales REP to 

call on accounts In your area. $40 K 

to $80 K First year Comm. Potential. 

405-728-9998. 

TELEPHONE SALES 

Working from our Chesapeake 
offfce, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Mon.-Fri. 
Excellent opportunity for housewife 
or senior citizen. Call 547-4571. 

PART-TIME-Exp. in phone sales 
helpful. Work at home. Great- in- 
come opportunity. Up to $50 per 
hour possible. 428-5720. 

PART-TIME-Sell Petra Ungerie whh 
home party plan. All lingerie under 
$35. Free kit, excellent income. Car 
req'd. 1-800-484-1031. Cede 9802. 

CONSTRUCTION: Hiring all trades 
immediately for large projects. Ex- 
perience required. Excellent salaries 
and benefKs. Open Sunday through 
Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 305-929- 
6223. ext. 21. 

MANAGER-NAVY TECH LIBRARY- 
Va. Beach. 3 years experience, two 
years management or tedi. Assis- 
tant-one year administrative and 
one year tech. FAX (301 ) 459-5465. 
FMC, Mn: Cheryl, 4388 L^ttsford 
Vista Road, Lanham, MP 20706. 

HOME WORKERS NEEDED at 
once. Full/part-time. No experience/ 
capital needed. Applications mshed. 
Send stamped envefope - Milhoun, 
9627 1st Bay St., Suite C, Dept. K, 
NorfoH(,VA23518. 



BARTENDINQ 

A NEW CAREER 

International bartending Institute 

Call 497-6700 for more info. 



LIVESTOCK 



HORSE-2 yr. old Palomino paint 
stud. Started under saddle, very 
gentle. $600 negotiable. 482-8280. 



MISC. FOR SALE 



HAPPY JACK FLEA GARD: All met- 
al patented device controls fleas in 
the home without PESTICIDES or 
EXTERMINATORS. Results 
overnight. INDUSTRIAL HDWE ft 
SPLY 543-2232. 

KILLS FLEAS! 

Buy ENFORCER Flea Killers for 
pets, home & yard. Guaranteed 
effectivel Buy ENFORCER at Rob- 
bies Home Center, 3410 High St., 
Portsmouth, VA. 

BRITISH ISLES RECIPES-Comlsh 
Pasties, Devonshire Splits. 1 8 more, 
send $5.50 to Susan Pratt. P.O. box 
15356. Chesapeake. VA 23328- 
5356. 

COUNTRY CURTAINS. 18 CUBIC 
toot refrigerator, washer & dryer. 
Down sofa. antk|ua table, chairs ft 
glassware, patto f umiture. Call 569- 
0630. 

MINOLTA-FEEDER. 20 BIN 
SORTER ft STAND 

3 years oW. Very low useaga. Just 
serviced. Will deliver. Negotiable. 
495-3237. 



MOBILE HOMES 



FLEETWOOD-'87 14 x 70. Have 
10% down to refinance? 3 bedroom. 
2 bath, like new, many extras. Will 
negotiate moving home. $12,500. 
Call 934-8474. 



MUSICAL 



PIANO-Baby Grand. "Chkrkering,' 
refinished. nk;e Ivory keys, excellent 
tone. Delivered. $1,895. Call 744- 
4761. 



PERSONALS 



ADOPTIONiWAiyTED A BABYfA 
dream coma: true for us. Warm, 
fuzzy, childless couple longs to 
share loving home with the child 
they cani have themselves. Can 
help with legal/medical expenses. 
Please, let's talk. Call collect. Len ft 
Susan (703) 768-HUGS. 

ADOPTION: Give your baby full- 
time parenting, a happy opportunity- 
filled future, and a large loving ex- 
tended family. Let's help each other. 
Call Julie/Stan collect 703-503- 
9434. 

YOUNG "SI- HAPPILY MARRIED 
couple, unable to have a baby 
desires to share their k}ve with a 
white infant. Will provide warmth ft 
security in a beautiful home. Can 
help with legal and medical 
expenses. Please call collect even- 
ings or weekends at (703) 444- 
4943. 

ADOPTION-YOUNG CHILDLESS 
COUPLE wishes to give a baby a 
happy and secure future. Lots of 
love from a full-time mom and 
devoted dad. Legal/medbal paid. 
Call collect Cheryl and Chris 703- 
817-9884. 

ADOPTION 
Loving couple wishes to adopt baby. 
Legal and medcal expenses paid. 
Please call Ginny and Bill collect at 
703-241-8165. 

ADOPTION: OUR ADOPTED 
DAUGHTER wants a brother/sister 
and wo want to finish our family. 
Can pay legal/medical. Call Lynn or 
Steve collect 703-408-3701. 



Bunded - J & L - liisuif-ci 

CARPET CLEANERS 



PHONE: 491-9198 



ifi. 



Slpartmnts &1oumhousts 

fitness Center. 

year round Spa & Sauna, 

IJtnmsCmrts 

& 'Butting Qrun 

Open 'Daify 9-6} Sw 116 

On Providence Road 2 Mi. 



W. of MillUry Bghway 

424-7867 



tfh 



PERSONALS 



ADOPTION 
We can give kyour baby a toving 
home, and can helpl Let's discuss 
"Caring Adoptton . . . Tom/Lorraine 
(301) 897-9528 Collect. 

SURROGATE MOTHERS 
WANTED-Fee plus expenses for 
carrying a couple's child. Must t>e 
18-35 and prevnusly had a child. 
Steve Litz, Atty. (317) 996-2000. 

A LOVING CHILDLESS COUPLE 
wishes to give your baby a happy, 
opportunity-filled future. Can pay 
legal and medical expenses. Please 
call Molly and Peter collect, (703) 
256-5492. 

ADOPTION-Happy, dependable 
coi^le, fovea children and wants to 
adopt a caucasbn baby. We are a 
family doctor and spouse, capable 
of providing a secure, foving home. 
Willing to pay legal & medical 
expenses. Call Harriet & David toll- 
free at home 1-800-484-7622 
'Security Code 4428.' 



PETS 



URINE-ERASE guarantees removal 
urine stains, odors, from carpets. 
Regardless stain agel 24 hr. toll free 
Information. Reidell Chemicals 
Limited 1-800-56-ERASE. 

AQUARIUM SET UPS-2 complete. 
55 gal. $200; 30 gal. $90. Diatom 
filter, needs few small parts $30. 
340-1301. 

AKITA PUPPIES 
Gorgeous coloring ft show quality. 
1st shots, vet checked. Starting at 
$750. Must see to appreciate. If no 
answer, please leave message, 
473-8364. 

COCK-A-TOO - White 2 1/2 yr. oW 
male. Cage/perch. Needs lots of 
attentfon. Call 1-874-7540. 



REAL ESTATE 



CHOWAN RIVER-NC. Restaurant 
with oyster bar, (2,880 sq. ft.), 2 
story, 3 bedroom. 1 1/2 bath 
resklential, 1,800 sq. ft. A 13 slip 
boat house, 30 space campground, 
beach & gas pier situated on 7 1/2 
acres. $420.000. 919-358-3901. 

J=OR 446.500 YOU CAN QWH A 2 , 
BR,*f BAIri Freen Run VAxaAdinew , 
carpet. 3 patfos and all appliances. 
471-7704. 



RENTALS 



NORFOLK ft PORTSMOUTH 

NICE ft CLEAN. FREE 

telephone & bask: cable. Washer ft 

dryer. Utilities included & fully 

furnished. Only $75 wk. 623-5489. 

SUFFOLK-COLLEGE PARK. 1/2 
duplex. 1 1/2 bath. 2 bedroom, 
dining room, living room, private 
driveway. $445 per month. 490- 
7027. 

VILLA HEIGHTS-Newly remodeled, 
new carpet, appliances, painted in- 
sfoe & out. Two bedroom, 1 bath, 
water ft sewage included. $375 ft 
security. 466-1706. 



WATERFRONT 



UKE GASTON, NC 

WATERFRONT HOMES & LOTS 

CALL FOR INFORMATION. 7 

DAYS. 

SUN SET REALTY 

1-800-333-3297. 



partHIBI 

Looking for a job that appreciates you 
for your hard wori( & foyai^? 
Let EBA (how you tfie way. 
•Job Security 

• PaM Vacaikm 

• Super Bonus a Incentive Programi 

• Advancement Opportixiitias From 
WitNn 

ImmectelB openings are available for 
individuals posaatting good 
communicMion tkilto iMth full trairring 
prwMed. 

If InlwettBd cal Mrs. Wiloughby. 
4W4701 



$ 
$ 
• 
$ 
$ 
• 



$ 
$ 
$ 

$ 
$ 
$ 



MAKE 

MONEY 

FAST! 

This exciting oppor- ^ 
( tunity may be just for ^ 
$ you. ( 

^ Your organization ^ 
can earn extra money ^ 
^ fast and easy soliciting g 
subscriptions to your g 
local community news- g 
$ paper. ^ 

For more informa- ^ 
tion, call 547-4571 and ^ 
ask to speak to ^meone g 
$ about CAMPAIGN 50.0 

itsiseseesise 



•^tmmmmimmmmmmmmmm 



wmmmm 



mmmmimmmmmmmmm 



mmmmmmmmi 



10 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 15. 1992 




Proceeds from race to benefit ODU and Christopher Newport 



By CAROL PRATT 
Special to The Portsmouth Times 

A unique event off^ering two days 
of the best hospitality in Hampton 
Roads benefits two of the region's 
educational institutions. Cock Is- 
land Race, celebrating its fifth year 
on the zero mile marker of the In- 



tracoastal Waterway, will donate 
proceeds to the sailing teams of Old 
Dominion University and Christo- 
pher Newport College. 

Slated as the premiere sailboat 
race on the East Coast, Cock Island 
Race will take place on Friday and 
Saturday. July 17 and 18, starting 



A rainbow of sails will 
decorate the Elizabeth 



at the Portsmouth Seawall, as col- 
orful spinakers adorn the Elizabeth 
River. 

"It's a casual race for the serious 
sailor, and a serious race for the ca- 
sual sailor," said chairman Mo 
Whitlow. 

The event has the distinction of 
being the first regatta of its kind to 
mix both groups in a single event 
The race is open to the following 
classes: IMS, all PHRF classes, J- 
24 and cruising, and expects to draw 
over 250 boats. 



The prestigious Hanbury Cup, 
awarded to the most outstanding 
performance by a skipper, is named 
for Euclid Hanbury, an 89-year-old 
renowned Chesapeake Bay sailor. 
Christopher Newport College's 
sailing team is also named for 
Hanbury. 

Cock Island Race hosts a lot of 
exciting activities for sailors and 
landlubbers, alike. The entertain- 
ment venue includes music by the 
Bay Trading Company, The Fabu- 
lous Cruisers, Dramtree as well as 



Bill Deal and Fat Ammon. 

The event is a regional product of 
giving, both from sponsors -and 
volunteers. 

"We have tremendous support 
from 10 sponsors and over a hun- 
dred volunteers, representing the 
entire Hampton Roads area. Hie 
cooperative effort is both rewanUnK 



and fun," said Whitlow. 

Sponsors include Raven, Centel 
Cellular, Cruising Club of Vir- 
ginia, Dominion Towct, Michelob. 
Oldies 95.7. Portfolio. Tidewater 

Yachl Marina, WAVY-TV 10 and 
the city of Portsmouth. The event 
is hosted by PortsE vents. Inc. 



Ahoy mates! Join over 250 skip- 
pers and their crew as they set sail 
for a grand celebration: the Fifth- 
Annual Cock Island Race, scheduled 
for Friday, July 17 and Saturday, 
July 18 on the downtown 
Portsmouth waterfront 

Festivities will kick-off at 4 p.m. 
on Friday with music by "Bay 
Trading Co.," followed by a strwt- 
dancc at 7 p.m. featuring "The 
Fabulous Cruisers." 



From 10 am. to noon, watch a 
rainbow of sails decorate Hampton 
Roads as the races begin. Then, 
cruise back down to Portside at 4 
p.m. to hear the sounds of 
"Dramtreco." 

Top the day with tunes by 
Portsmouth's own Bill Desd and Fat 
Ammon at 7 p.m. Join ski ppers to 
congratulate the winners at the 
awards ceremony, scheduled for 
8:30 p.m. on the Portside Water 



N^ Stage. 
Skippers of all sorts will com\ 11,15 event is free and c^en to the 
pete in Saturday's race, which runs\public and is hosted by PortsE vents 
from the Elizabeth River to Hamp- \,(j sponsored by Oldies 95.7. 
ton Roads, with the starting and Michelob. the Cruising Club of 
finishing point at mile post zero on 
the Intercoastal Waterway. Classes 
include IMS, PHRF. A. B. C. N, 
J-24 and special crusing classes for 
non-spinnaker yachts. 



Virginia, Wavy TV- 10, Tidewater 
Yacht Marina, Port Folio, Domin- 
ion Tower and Centel Cellular. 

For more information call 393- 
9933. 



VIRGINIA SPORTS 
HALL OF FAME, INC. 

420 High Street 
Portsmouth, VA 23705 

393-8031 

Hours: Tues - Sat. 10-5; Sun. 1-5; Monday. Closed 




TELEPHONE (804) 397-4689 



^^fd <P, Sax^a, J\Mh. 
VASCULAR & GENERAL SURGERY 



OFFICE HOURS 
BY APPOINTMENT 



3500 SOUTH STREET 
PORTSMOUTH. VIRG'NIA 23707 



_^ ^ DaveWilbar 

I* C A General Mannar 

Charter Fleet 800-768-2022 

&804588-2022 

f^ •%• WelkMghbayHvbor Marin* 

Wailirip' ISZSBayvfllcSt 

^-'******'^0 Norfolk, V^nia 23909 

School CHESAPEAKE SMMQ k 

*^^*^*' ASSOCIATION Am 





Boats, such as the one pictured here, will line the Elizabeth 
River this weel^end for the Cock Island Race. 

11 i JHEAVIDLiNICS i 



Perms 
Color 



483-0773 



I 



Haircuts | 
Solar Nails I 

5850 Churchland Blvd. Portsmouth. Va. j 



' 10% Discount unth This Coupon J 



Enjoy a Safe Boating Season From 

Chesapeake Bay Dive Team Club 

and 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DIVING CENTER 

U.S. Divere Dealership, Sftles & Repair 

Scuba Diving Lessons 

(Scuba School International) 

Beuchat Etealership 
Comnwrdal Diving Sarioes 



(A Full Servia Dive Shop) 

655 Mt. Vemon Avenue 

Portsmouth, Virginia 23707 



397-0422 




Surfing Asso. 
well into its 
summer season 

Pages 




Mayfest outing 
draws more than 

1,000 attendees 

Pages 4 




Inside: 
Public Notices 

Pages 7 & 8 

Classifi^ 

ills'. 



The Virginia B 









t.. "-Suh 



>j^ 






y 



Wednesday, July 22, 1992 



SERVING THE CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 



"What was he doing with a minor?" 



Dr. Loxley's arrest 
surprises some, while 
others are defensive 

Virginia BMoh Sun Staff Report 

The community is wondering 
just what Dr. Sidney S. Loxtey did 
to be arrested and charged with 
contributing to the delinquency of 
a minor. 

Acc(Hx!ing toaChesiq)eakemag- 
istrate, this chaige could mean a 
variety of 
things, in- 
cluding Jiav- 
ing sex with 
someone un- 
der the age of 
IS.oro^oing 
them alcohol 
or illegal 
drugs. 
Loxtey One resi- 

dent told The Virginiti Beach Sun 
he has seoi Loxley, a well-known 
local orthopedic surgeon, hanging 
around with a teenage girl and in- 
dicated that they woe acting "lovey 
dovey." Loxley could not be 
reached for a)mnient. 





The contributing to the 
delinquency of a minor 
charge, according to a 
CheMpeake ntagi^Me,- 
means, "Any person 18 
years of age orolder, includ- 
ing the parent of any child 
who Shalt willfully contritxjte 
to, encourage, cause or 
lend to cause any act of 
omission or condition which 
renders a child delinquent." 

These matters often in- 
(Ajde an achjit having sex 
with a minor or offering a 
minor alcohol or illegal 
drugs. 

The maximum penalty 
for the charge is one year in 
jail and a $2,500 fine, or 
both, but the penalty de- 
pends on the severity of the 
crime, as determined by a 
juvenile court judge. 



"I know of Dr. Loxley. I thought 
he was a respected doctor around 
here." said Altoi Caison, of Great 
Bridge. "What was he doing with a 
minor?" 

Loxley. who has offices in 
Chesapeake and Virginia Beach, 
didnotretumrqxMters* phorMcalls 
to c(Hnment on his being arrested 
on June 25. He was later released 
on a personal recognizance bond, 
pending his court date. He was 
reportedly performing surgoy last 
v/cek, and the offlce manager at his 
NOTth Battlefield Boulevard office 
said his practice would "go on as 
usual" decile the charge. 

"Evwylhing is Tme here," she 
said. 

Loxley's name is also well- 
known locally because he and his 
wife, Jean Loxley, owned TTie 
Shof^r, a kxai tabloid they sold 
in mid-June to another tabloid 
l>ased in Virginia Beach. 

It is unclou' why the Loxl^s 
sold their publication, f(»mer]y 
called The Great Bridge Shof^et. 
"WhateverreasonsThe Sh^xr 
was sold are no concern or biia- 
ness of oan," said Melissa Gre- 
gwy, tabloid editw. "No rtason 
was given. Wc didn't ask ... we 
didn't pras the Loxleys ... Be- 
yond whtf we say in our state- 



ments, that's all we'll say." 

Jean Loxley will omtinue to be 
T1)eShq)pa''spublisher,acconling 
to an announcement in its July is- 
sue. It is unclear whether Sidney 
Loxley will continue to write medi- 
cal columns for the publication that 
he has written in the past 

The Lozle j^ are or have 
separated, and a divorce may be 
pending, sources say. Jean Loxley 
could not be reached for comment 

Sidney Loxley lives, wortcs and 
attends church, the Oak Grove 
United Methodist Church, all 
within a seven-mile area in Great 
Bridge. He is known for singing, 
sometimes solos, in church, where 
he has also served as a layman. 

"If he has done wrong, it's unfor- 
tunate," said Mary Wilson, a Great 
Bridge homemaker. "I liked his 
column. He looks likeanice man." 

Loxley lives on Argyll Street 
ofl'Butts Station Road. A group of 
neighbors gathered outside near his 
•home would not comment on Lox- 
ley. One used foul language to tell 
a rqxKter this was "none of (her) - 
— business." 

A woman leaving the Oak Grove 
United Methodist Church office, 
on North Battlefield Boulevard, 
also was rude to a reports, ^ying 
to another, "Don'ttalk to ha. Ihate 
peq)le who pry intootho- people's 
business." 

The community,however,is still 
,W(Hulering what to make of Lox- 
ley's arrest. 

"I hope he didn't do anything 
wrong," Wilson said. 

The contributing to the delin- 
quency of a minor charge was clari- 
fied by a Chesapeake magistrate 
as. "Any person 18 years of age or 
oMer, including the parent of any 
child, who shall willfully contribute 
to, encourage, causeor laid to cause 
any act of omisskm or condition 
which rendos a child delinquent" 
These mattersoflen include an adult 
and a minor's involvement with 
sex, alcohol or illegal drugs. 

The maximum penalty for the 
charge is one year in jail and a 
$2,500 fine, or both, but tlw pen- 
alty depoids on the sevoity of the 
crime, as determined by a juvenile 
court judge. 

Loxley's release on a personal 
recognizance bond means it was 
determined he was well-established 
enough in the area to be let free 
with only a signature and nocollat- 
eral. pending his court date. 

Loxley also has an 
office in Virginia 
Beach at the Haygood Medical 
Center on Independence Boule- 
vard. AccOTding to Loxley's Great 
Bridge recq)tionist patients are 
seen only on Tuesdays, In Virginia 
Beach , although a sign on his k)cked 
office door indicates some Wednes- 
day hours as well. 

Of the neariy one 
dozen doctors' of- 




Dr. Loxley has an office in the Haygood Medical Center on 
Independence Boulevard. 




Loxley, M.D. FAGS, an orthopedic surgeon, has an office on 
North Battlefield Boulevard. His office manager said his 
practice will go on as usual, despite his being charged with 
contributing to the delinquency of a minor. 




Loxley's home Is located on Argyll Street, off Butts Station 
Road. When a journalist approached the home to take a pic- 
ture, a group of neighbors used vulgar language to tell her 
Loxley's business was "none of (her) . . . business." 




Dr. Sidney Loxley attends Oak Grove United Methodist 
Church, where he sings and has served as a layman. 



flees in the same 

hall as Loxley's 

most said they did 

not know him; nor 

had they heard of 

the arrest. 



of his arrest because it a^qtarenUy 
has mrt been repeated in The Vir- 
giiuan-PUol. 

An emptoyee at one cardiolo- 
gist's office said she has heard of 
him several 
times and was 
surprised to 
hear of his ar- 
rest whoitoU 
ofit by a Vir- 
ginia Beach 
Sun reporter. 
"His name 




J. Loxtey 



Of ttK nearly one doecen (kx- 
ters' offkes in the same hall as 
Loxl^'s Haygood office, more 
than Ihree-fo^ths (tf the onptoy- 
eea do iK)t know him , and said they 
had no commoit None had heard 



IS very repu- 
table," she 
said. 
Moments later, another em- 
ployee stepped forward and 
|Hx>mpUy ckwcd the rw^jXionist 
window o) the reporter's face, sat- 
ing "no comment" 
In iuiotha' office, two emptoy- 



ees dropped their jaws in disbelief, 
saying the doctor is well respected, 
aiKl well-known, but they did not 
know him personally. 

A woman in another office, just 
down the hall from Loxley's suite, 
swifdy ushered the reporter out of 
the office, stating "no comment 
and that includes no comment that 
you were ever even here." 

TTie U.S. Postal Service letter 
cwrier who service Loxley's of- 
fice, Walter Fulu, said that while 
he has never personally met Lox- 
ley, rai thejlays his office is opai, 
his patients always seem to be 
h^py and in pleasant moods, and 
Lo^^y "always seemed to be nice." 

Fultz said he was surprised to 
hear of Loxley's mrest 

"It kind of took me aback." he 
Mid. "I wouldn't expect it out <rf 
him." 



66th Year No. 30 25 Cents 



Chief Wall defends 
his depdrtment's 
low arrest record 



City Council approves $150,000 for Owl's Creek boat ramp 



By LEE CAHILL 

VwgWa Beach Sm City Coundl Ftopctfler 

A $150,000 grant from the Vir- 
ginia Department of Game and 
Fisheries will provide |wtial fund- 
ing for the improvement of the 
Owl's Q«dc Bom Ramp. 



Hie total project is listed in the 
CafMtal Budget for the years 1997- 
^1. « an estimated $450,000. It 
includes a permanent restroom 
facility and expansion ami living (tf 
parking areas, which will provide 
^Jpnwimately 180 spaces. 



The grant money will be used to 
improve the parking lot with 75 
ca/tmler sf^ces, four handicapped 
ctf/trailo- si^Kxs, a %par^ IS-cs 
lurking s-ea, two handicapped car 
^jaces aid ro^way. 

Also incliKM in the jxojecl will 



be the insialtatkm of portable toilet 
units, including at least one handi- 
capped-accessible toilet facility, 
walking trails to fishing and view- 
ing areas and the consuuction of a 
concrete pad to facilitaic boat 
Iwnching. 



Police chief says 
decrease reflects a 
philosophical change 

By M.J. RICHARDS 
VinjJnia Beach Sun Staff Writer 

The Virginia Beach Police De- 
partment has issued less traffic 
summonses and has made less ar- 
rests this year than it did last year. 
Mayor Meyera Obemdorf recently 
called for an investigation as to 
why this has occurred. 

Virginia Beach Police Chief 
Charles Wall, who has been 
hounded by The Virginian-Pilot and 
The Ledger-Star, and its tabloid in- 
sert The Beacon with several news- 
paper articles concerning the effi- 
ciency of the police department, 
said he has looked into the matter. 

With a total of 126,918 calls to 
Virginia Beach police for SCTvice in 
the first six months of this year, 
they are up from 1 18,343 of the 
first six months of last year. The 
number of arrests and tickets are 
down, however. The Pilot recently 
criticized Wall in an article on 
Sunday. July 12, stating "Seems 
every police officer you talk to has 
4^i££E9EI^7Cason for not writing as 
many tickets or making as many 
arrests as ihcy used to." 

But Wall has looked at the case 
statistics, and said it is not neces-. 
sariiy bad to reduce the number of 



"We're trying to work 
at solving their (pris- 
onera') problems in- 
stead of putting 



them in a revolving 

door - in the Jail, out 

of the jail, in the 



Jail." 



IMIIc* Chief Charle* ^aU 

arrests and issued tickets. 

"I see that more on the positive 
side than the negative side," said 
Wall. "Well, because we have to 
live with the overall. Yes, sum- 
monses are down and yes, misde- 
meanor arrests are (town." 

He said the reason for the de- 
crease over the past two years is 
that his department has changed its 
focus. 

"We're a completely different po- 
lice department now," said Wall. 
"We've got different philosophies. 
We're more community-oriented. 
We've got community stations 
open now in three neighborhoods. 
So we'RMsore involved. WeVsgot 
citizen advisoy groups fcM- each one 
of the precincts. So it's just a dif- 
ferent department" 

Sm POUCE, Pag* 6 




The Watergate fire started outside the buikling, and moved 
up to the roof and attic, completely destroying the third 
floor apartments and damaging the other floors. 

"It was very hot" 

Watergate apartment residents relive the fear and loss 
incun-ed after early morning fire destroys 12 units, causes 
$1 million in damage 



By M.J. RICHARDS 
Virpinja Beach Sun ^ff Writer 

There is nothing left in Scott 
Day's old Watergate qwtmoit, ex- 
cept the water-logged, sooL-covGnd 
w^lls, ceiling sid rug. 



Day, 27, lived in one of 12 
apartments on Spring Lake Cres- 
cent in the ^Mutment commimity 
on Birdneck Ro^, that was de- 
saoyed by a fire la« week. 

a Sm WATERQATE, ftig* t 



tmwh'tdmn. m-mm^^mmmmrmmm^m^mmHm 



1. 1 iJiLii wftft 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 9m]iM.m^mmmmmmmmm9mmmmm&&99m9mmua&m9mummm9m9m 



2 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 22. 1992 




Vacation at home 

As many Virginia Beach residents are still recovering from 
tough tinws in tfie economy, the words "summer vacation" 
might be a dirty joke. But they don't have to be. 

A.^umma- vacation doesn't mean you have to take two weeks 
off -work, pack the family into the car and spend loads of 
'inoney you don't have on a place you've never been. 

Instead, it can be a tin% for families to break from the daily 
routine and spend some time together. For those with "paUi 
vacation" from work, it can be a relaxing change. 

Why not take the week off and spend it doing the things you 
always wanted to do, but never had the time for? A trip to the 
zoo or a picnic in the park, with an overnight or day trip to 
Williamsburg or the mountains sandwiched in-between, might 
be a good way to relieve stress without breaking your wallet. 

With vacation also comes a guarantee of sleeping in. For 
those who dream of sleeping through the alarm clock in their 
own bed, wishing they didn't have to go to work that day, a 
vacation spent at home might be the answer. 

Better yet, take the phone off the hook and disappear from 
your daily routine completely. 

You could go fishing or window shopping, depending on 
your preference. 

For those with children, the kids will probably be excited to 
Have mom and dad all to themselves for a few days. 

It might be the kind of break you all need, widiout the extra 
expenses. — M.J.R. 

Vote 

Now that Texas billionaire and undeclared independent can- 
didate Ross Perot has officially dropped out of the presidential 
election can^aign, the field has narrowed to two candidates. 

In November, Virginia Beach residents must make a choice 
between Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton and President George 
Bush. 

Some I^rot supporters say that because he is no longer in the 
race, they have no desire to vote. ITiey say they don't like the 
choices, so they won't vote for anyone. 

But doesn't that defeat the purpose for which his supporters 
woriced? Wasn't part of his point to get Americans back into 
the political process? 

By not voting, U.S. citizens are only saying they don't want 
to imke a difference in the countiy's future. 

Tlie presidential candidate is not the onl^ one to vote for in 
the upcoming election. State representatives will be on the 
ballot as well. 

By not voting at all, people not only make the statement that 
they dislike the political system and its candidates, but that they 
have no intentions of doing ariything about it. ^ M.J.R. 



Renter's insurance 

Being a fire victim can be devastating. Losing everything 
you own and your home is not something people like to think 
about. But you need to, if you rent housing. 

Many Watergate residents whose homes were destroyed by 
fire could have saved themselves additional pain by having in- 
surance. 

It may cost a littie extra, but if your home is ever destroyed 
by fire, you're covered. Most apartments and rental properties 
state on the lease that the building's occupant is not covered by 
catastrophes such as fires, floods, tornados and similar disas- 
ters. 

Imagine what would happen if your home or business was 
destroyed. Would you be covered? An optimistic way to con- 
sider the issue is to think of the future. By getting renter's in- 
surance, you know Uiat items of value can be replaced if they 
are destroyed, and you don't have to start over with nothing. 
— M.J.R. 



Just a Chat nominations 

Each week. The Virginia Beach Sun features a notable 
member of the Virginia Beach community in its "Just a Chat" 
interview. 

If there is scHneone in your neighborhood or workplace who 
has been recognized with an award or an accomplishment that 
you would like to see featured in the chat, send us that person's 
name and telephone number with a brief description of his or 
her notoriety to: the Virginia Be^h Sun, 138 Saith Rosemont 
Road, suite 209, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 

Be sure to include your name and teleph(»ie number. If a 
photo of the person is available, it should also be included. — 
M.J.R. 

A change in the weather 

The weather in Virginia Beach has been a bit strsmge lately. 
First it's so hot you can barely breathe, then it rains and 
storms. 

"Die best way to combat Uie weather is to stay inside when 
it's too hot or wet to go out. 

The weather will be cooperating soon, so putting off an extra 
mowing or two of the lawn might not be such a bad idea. Let 
the extra running around in foul weather wait until it's cooIct or 
drier. 

It might be bener just to sit inside and drink a tall glass of 
your favorite beverage. And wait. — M.J.R. 



AL60REBRiNe6 
ME1HE0NE1MIH$ 

jmqHM&kr 




Making a difference in life often comes in small 
ways like buying doughnuts from a teenager 




My head was pounding from star- 
ing at a computer all day long. All I 
could think 
about as I was 
driving home 
'rom woik was 
getting some- 
thing cool to 
drink and then 
crashing on the 
couch to relax. 
I pulled up 
into my drive- 
way, and a boy 
about 15- 
years-old was 
rihging my 
door bell. In 
his arms he had 
stacked six or 
seven dough- 
nut boxes. 

"Oh no." I 

thought. I was in no mood to deal 

with a salesman. 
The boy came walking toward my 

car. I would be polite, but I knew I 

wouldn't buy anything. 
"Ma'am," he said graciously. "I 

am selling doughnuts for my church 

youth group, and I wondered if you 



SIICB Of 

Life 

By Melanie 
Beroth, a New- 
town area re$i- 
dent and pn^s- 
aional typeeetter. 



would like to buy some." 

My funds were tight, and dough- 
nuts were not something I wanted to 
splurge on. 

"No," I said politely, "but thank 

Then it hit me - this 

boy could be on the 

street selling drugs 

and making hun- 

dreds of dollars. 

Kids all over the city 

were selling them. 

It would have been 

so easy to succomb" 

to that pressure. 

you." 

He smiled sweetly but the light 
from his face was gone. He started to 
walk to the next door. I was sure I 
was only one on a long list of rejec- 
tions. 

Then it hit me - this boy could be on 
the street selling drugs and making 
hundreds of dollars. Kids all over the 



city were selling them. Itwouldhave 
been so easy to succumb to that pres- 
sure. 

All he was asking ftom me was 
several dollars for his church youth 
group. 

"Wait." I called to him. "What 
church do you go to?" 

He told me and explained he had 
been going there all his life. 

"I changed my mind," I said after a 
couple minutes of small talk. "I'd 
like to buy a box." 

His face brightened, but then, with 
all the maturity of a businessman, he 
conducted his sale and went to the 
next door. 

I watched him out the window as 
he continued around our block. 
House itfter house of shaking heads 
and shutting doors. 

He didn't stop though. He was 
making honest money for a good 
cause. 

Later, I started packing my lunch 
for the next day. I smiled as I put a 
doughnut into my bag. 

"Please be with that boy," I prayed 
softly. In just a small way, I felt like 
I had helped make a differoice in our 
world. 



VBS DEADLINES 

News deadline for The Virginia Beach Sun are: 5 p.m. Friday fw the 
upcoming We(biesday's is^ie. 

• Articles must be legible, iHef^ably typed, doubte q»ced on standard 
size paper. 

• Pictures must be sharp, clcai aid accompanied with complete 'mttsmt- 
tkxi. (All persons in picture must be identin^.) 

• News may be brought ot mailed in and stould iiKluik the name ami 
telqAone numbers of the pcaam sutmitting iL 

• The Vi^nia Beach Sun welcomes sid encwiaga letters ftom itt 
readers (M Kqws ttfgowral interes. 

• All leitss mt&l Gary tint mne and address of writer. 

• Utttrs dmiki be »)dre^ to: Editiv, Tte Vi^nia Beach Sun, 138 
RosKnont RojKl. Suite 209, Virginia Bc«;h. Va. 23452. 



Just A Chat 

with Heike Muller 



Heike Muller is in a foreign exchange program from 
East Germany, and will be going back to her country in 
mid-August. 

Midler, who is a live-in nanny for a 3-year-old girl 
and 22-month-old boy, said she has enjoyed her trip to 
America, and likes it very much. 

"Everything is so different," she said. "It's a totally 
d^erent life. The people are different, the food is 
different, Everything is typical American." 

Name: Heike Muller. 

Nickname: No. 

Occupation: Live-in nanny for one year. 

Neighborhood: Great Neck R)int. 

Hometown: Erfurt. East Germany. 

How long have you lived in Virginia Beach: Ex- 
actly one year. 

Last city you lived in befwe moving to Virginia 
Beach: Erfurt 

Age: 20. 

Marital statos: No. 

Children: No. 

What you love about your job: Being with the 
family and see how they live together and I like the 
children. I collect lots of experiences; how to feed them 
and educate thetn. 

What you hate about your job: Nothing. 

If you didn't have your current job, you would be: 
I would go to school. 

Biggest accomplishment in your life: Going to the 
United Slates. It's like a childhood dream. 

Secret to success: Be nk:e and always decide what's 
the best for yourself Evoi if it's not the best, you can say 
you warned U for yourself. 

if you could change me aspect of your life to make 
it better, what would it be: I wouldn't change anything. 
I'm hai^y with my life. 

What most people doo't know about you is: I don't 
like to talk about it. 

Best pereonallty trait: I try u> be nice toevoybody. 
even if I don't like them. 

Worst iMnonaiity trait: I'm very moody. 

Pet peeve: When rm in a hurry , and otho- peo|de are 
slow or makt me late. 

Blg^ qnirk; I bugh at simple things that most 
pe(^le (ton't Iwgh tt, lite old aitomis <x stiq}id jokes. 

If you had your life to live over again, what would 
you do dHferently: Nothing. 

If |oa i»m the tottery, what «wM yon do with the 
mimey: I would buy myself a house and a new car. 
maybe share it with my Umily and friends; go on 
vacttim once a yev. 

Pan evenly: Go out with a couple friends and talk. 

Fan weekend: Spending the whole weekend with 
my boyfrfcnd, like driving lo Nags Head. N.C. « just 
have a nice time U^ether. 

Dram vacattoa: Hawmi. 




Favorite magazine: InGermany. "Brigte," whichis 
a magazine ftx young women. 

I drive a: Volkswagen Jetta. which is still in Ger- 
many. 

Dream car: Porscte. 

Favorite sport: Swimming and bicycling. 

Favorite sports team : German national soccer team. 

Who do you most admire: My parents. Christina 
and Manfred Muller. 

What do you like to do to relax after a hard day's 
work: I like to go out fflid spend time with my friends 

Your favm-ite food and drink: Seafood and tea. 

Food you hate the most: Pudding. 

Favorite restaurant: Rudee's Restaurant at Rwlee 
Inlet 

FavOTite food to cook: A Gcrmai fried potato dish. 

Favorite artkte of clotUng: Mini-skirt 

Favorite televisk)n program: MTV. 

Favorite movie: Top Gun. 

Your favorite type of music: Oldies. 

The happiest time tai your Itfe, so far: The laA ax 
months in the United States. 

If you were to become fami^, what wooM ymi 
want to be famous for: A singer or an actress. 

What k the most fun time you have had In tte past 
week: Spending time with my boyfriend. Patrk:k. 

If you couM pick just two (tf the Mtoiring, whkdi 
would you pick: brains, tooks, a good iMrtonaNty or 
wealth? A good personality and l^ns. 

What do you think is me of the b^gest probleras 
facing the worM: Poc* peq>le; hungry pn^le. 

What do you think is one of the biggeirt problems 
fMng Virginia Beach: Wi^r. 

What do ymi like most about Virghiia Bnch: That 
it's so close to the beach. I tove the ocemi and the climtte 
andthehouMS. 

If you cmM sprad 10 mtaota ahme with the 
President George Bnsh, what would you talk 
about?:I wouldn't talk about politics, I wmild a^ him 
about his faaiUy and his life, and what he likes to do. 




The fieal 
World 

^y B.J. Ses- 
tiona, Virginia 
Beach Sun col- 
umnist 



The Democrats' 
juking, jiving 
is over for now 

Now that all tte juking and jiving 
is over with for the Democrats, and 
the curse of having to watch that 
hypercritical spectacle last week has 
been lifted, we can now look forward 
to some of the same from the Repub- 
licans next month. 

In what can 
only be de- 
scribed asacar- 
nival-like at- 
mosphere, the 
Democrats 
promised ev- 
erybody every- 
thing, knowing 
full well that 80 
percent of their 
[Homises could 
notbefulfdled. 
They prom- 
ised a car for 
every garage 
andachickenin 
every pot They 
even went so frff 
— — ^^^— as to steal the 
wrads of a song that was written by 
the biggest liar of them all, Huey 
King Fish Long, a senate from Loui- 
siiuia, tong dead. In fact he was as- 
sassinated. Old Huey's song pro- 
claimed that he would"share-the- 
wealth" and that "every man would 
be a king" if only the people would 
suiqx)rt him. 

What Old Huey promised in that 
song is pretty close to what Clinton 
and Gore promised that crowd in 
New York last week. Oh! JessieJack- 
son talkedabout the poor and hungry, 
whkh is interesting because Jackson 
has not been poor and hungry in SO 
years. What the hell does he know 
about hungry? He doesn't look un- 
dernourished to me. 

Bill Clinton talked about what a 
wonderful wife he has and how de- 
voted he is to her. Wondff if he was 
thinking about her when he was with 
Jennifer Ftowers? He probably was. 
I never did understand why Al 
Gtwe's kid getting hit by a car quali- 
fies him to be vice president If he 
really was all that impressed, he 
should pick a large poor family and 
purchase some health and accident 
insurance for them. That will never 
h:q)pen. 

Finally, the greatest insult of them 
all, was to have Ted Komedy (the 
hero of Chappaquiddick) as one of 
the speakers. What a sham? 

The tribute to Bobby Kennedy 
played well with the Afro-Ameri- 
cans in spite of the fact that he autho- 
rized J. Edgar Hoovw, former F.B.I. 
director, to bug the late Martin Luthet 
King's bedroom and then pretended 
to be King's friend. Bobby also had a 
strange relationship with Marilyn 
Monroe. Those two are good ex- 
amples for our kids to foltow. kinda 
like Elvis Presley and Magic John- 
son. 

What this all boils down to is that it 
makes no difference who is elected 
inesident The poor will get pooer, 
the rich richer, the sick sicker and the 
lazy will be rewarded; while the 
worker will be taxed to mppcxt the 
lazy. The criminal will be prelected 
while the victim is punished. The 
cities will bum, and the taxpayos 
will rebuild them because someone 
got dq»essed and' had to vent their 
anger. 

Babies will continue to be mur- 
dered by the million and so will inno- 

□ Sa«THE,Pag«10 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

(USPS(>6(^140) 
138 South Rosemont Road 

Suite 209 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 
Telephone: (804) 486-3430 

Publisher 

Hanes Byerly 

Aralstant to the Publisher 

Managing Editor 

Greg Goldfarb 

SUff Writer 

M.J. Richards 

Comp<^tion 
l>oreaa l>c»nax 
Melanie Beroth 

Hie Virginia Be«^ Sun is pub- 
lishwi every Wednesdiy by Byerly 
Publications, Inc., Franklin, Va. Sec- 
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Worried about 
America's future? 



Virginia Beach Sun, Wednesday. July 22. 1992 3 




If you arc worried about the 
nation's drift - and who isn't? - you 
will want to read. The American 
Future: (What Would George and 
Tom Do Now?) 

United States Senator Richard G. 
Lugar suggests, "For the rcadw 
interested in the missicm of 
leadership and the core element of 
vision in 
setting Uie 
American 
agenda. Van 
Wishard 
guides one 
through a 
deeply 
personal 
journey to the 
2 1st century." 
Admittedly, 
Ireadan 
advance copy 
of this book 
with a certain 
bias, as Van is 
an old family 
friend. But I 
too found it 
illuminating. 
It presents a 
i^^-^— — brief but 
meaningful review of our nation's 
history, casts fr^h light on serious 
problems, and gives hope that We 
the People can once again strive 
together to shape our future. 

Like Socrates, Wishard does not 
provide ready-made answers. 
Actually, he doesn't answer any 
questions which might keep the 
reader from thinking. Instead, he 
offers assumptions about Ameri- 
cans and their country, then leaves 
it to the reader to determine if these 
are suitable for America's future. 
In the preface, Jerome F. Qimer, 



"The core of the new 

leadership is vision. 

Virion is seeing be- 

yond the Immediacy 

of the day . . . Vision 

is seeing what life 

could be like, while 

dealing with life as it 

is." 



Lil's 
Quill 



Lillian Youell, 
hoard member, 
Virginia Consor- 
tium far Law-Re- 
lated Education. 



VonWlsfiort 



president of the Congressional 
Institute which published the book 
earlier this month, writes that the 
. death of an adversary does not 
make a victory. "The recent demise 
of the 'evil empire' has not 
rendered universal happiness, 
wealth and prosperity for Ameri- 
cans - and it certainly won't for 
other citizens of the world. In fact, 
rather than simplifying life, the 
dissolution of the Soviet Union 
may have complicated matters: We 
Americans have lost the clearest 
and most long-running good-guy/ 
b^-guy contrast we have ever 
had." 

Wishard agrees. "The end of the 
Cold War only exacerbated 
America's innerconfusion about its 
direction. For 45 years, containing 
the Soviet Union had been the 
centerpiece of American foreign 
policy. Now what?" Now what 
turned out to be a new enemy and 
the Gulf War. 

g Sm WORRIED, Page 7 




Virginia Beach s 

Virginia Beach's most popular feature and asset, for tourists and local alike, is the At- 
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NEA convention - An assembly to remember 




TheVBEA 



More on Oberndorf's bsesil 
trip to l\/liyazalci, Japan 




To recap from where I left off in 
last week's column, I recently was 
invited to visit Virginia Beach's sis- 
ter city of Miyazaki, Japan. The trip 
was imd for by the Miyazaki Friend- 
ship Association, thecityofMiyazaki 
and the 

Hiroshima 
Prcfectural As- 
sembly. 

I gave a ma- 
jor speech in 
Miyazaki to 
government 
officials, civic 
leaders andeity 
employees. I 
talked about 
how I perceive 
the woman's 
role in America 
and what will 
be occurring in 
"Workforce 

2000." By the 

year 2000, our 
woricforce is going to be predomi- 
nfflitly women and mincMities. I em- 
phasized that thoe has to be a bal- 
ance l)etween one's family and one's 
career. Itcan be done if both husband 
and wife and children enter into a 
mutual aid contract My speech was 
well received by the audience. They 
are definitely open in Jai»in to die 
idea of ivogress by women. 

I had the opportunity to examine 
the business community in Japan. 
They are building a complex with a 
major golf course and a water park 
which is covered with a ixx)f that can 
open and close. The water park is a 
$200 million investment The cost 



The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 



I was also impressed 
by the Japanese me- 
dia. When we had a 
news conference, the 
media were all very 
polite. We got excel- 
lent coverage in the 
nenropapers . . . 



for the entire pro^t is $2 billion. I 
asked the J^anese how soon, if ever, 
they expected to get a return on their 
investment. They said they expected 
no return for 100 years. That was 
amazing to me. They were willing to 
build a complex of that magnitude 

D S««M0RE,Pag«7 



Over 1 3,000 attendees returned to 
their hometowns recently following 
the annual NEA coivention, anxious 
to begin implementing the "real" 
woik. For the rest of the summer and 
most of the fall, that work will have a 
decidedly political favor. I'd like to 
share with you 
some of, NEA 
president, Keith 
Geiger's key- 
note address. 

"As the NEA 
gathers here to- 
day, we're five 
blocks from the 
White House 
and nine blocks 
from Congress. 
We are right in 
the middle of 
our nation's 
capital, right in 
themiddleofan 
election year. 

"And yet I 
never feel 
closer to the 
true democratic 
ideals of this country than when I'm 
in a classroom where a child stands 
before the flag leading the Pledge of 
Allegiance. It's not the flags at the 
political fiind-raisers here in Wash- 
ington, not the flags in the motor- 
cades, not the flags politicians love to 
wrap themselves in that move me - 
it's the flags in the classrooms of this 
country. 

"I nevCT feel more hopeful than 
when I hear young voices in a class- 
room or the nearly 10,000 voices in 
this hall reciting in unison the Pledge 
of Allegiance. And that's what I 
want to talk to you about today in this 
100th anniversary year of the Pledge 
- 1 want to talk about our hopes for 



lAaa Guthrie, 
president of the 
Virginia Beach 
Education Aeso- 
ciation. 



this country. 

"Every year, we hold a represen- 
tative assembly. Evoy year you hear 
about the problems facing education 
and children. Every year you hear an 
NEA president get up and talk about 
NEA's plans to help. And I'm sure 
some of you must think, 'But, noth- 
ing changes. We still have children 
who are unprepared for school; we 
still have children who aren't receiv- 
ing medical care they need; we still 
have all of those other problems. It's 
taking too long.' 

"There is reason for hoRe. The 
political experts tell us this election is 
like no other they've ever seen. As 
one of them told me, 'All bets are 
off.' We have a public that is an^, 
frustrated, ready for change. And I 
un here to say to the country, so is the 
NEA! 

"I believe change is possible. And 
it can happen more quickly than we 
might expect If the empire of the 
Soviet Union can fall and the Berlin 
Wall can topple, change is possible. 
If billionaires like Helmsley and 
Milken can end up in jail, change is 
possible. If aii enraged American 
public can so scare membo^ of Con- 
gress that scores of thero decide to 
retire, change is possible. And if 
George Bush can go from 90 percent 
if the polls to 30 percent, change is 
possible! 

"Look at the opinion polls - people 
believe this country is on the wrong 
track. They overwhelmingly believe 
the nation's priorities must be reor- 
dered. Seventy percent dis^)prove 
of the president's handling of budget 
priorities. Eighty-three percent dis- 
approve of Congress' handling. It's 
dawning on people - the Cold War is 
over, but too many of our children are 
still out in the cold. Our convention 



"I believe change is 

possible. And It can 

happen more qulddy 

than we expect.** 



theme is Elections 92: Children, and 
I truly bdieve diat message is begin- 
ning to sink in. And why? B«^use: 
8S percent of the votos^nk our 
political leaders are not doingenough 
to help children. 



"Nine out of 10 Americans say it's 
important that all candidates have a 
children's platform. Two-thirds of 
American voters say they'd be more 
•likely to vote for a candidate who 
supports increased spending on chil- 
dren. 

"The Argentinian writn, Gabriella 
Marcella, says this: 'Many things in 
life can wait But the child cannot. 
Now is the time when hb boms are 
beingformed, his blood is being made. 



□ See NEA. Pag« 10 




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HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



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4 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednestey. July 22. 1992 

Bayside residents may now 
recycle at Cypress shopping center 



By DEBBIE DEVINE 

Special to The VirgMa BMCh Sun 

Bayside residents have an addi- 
tional opportunity to recycle at a 
new drop-ofT recycling <xaier in the 
Cy|»ess Point Shqiping Centa. 

Cypress Point Shopping Center 
is located at the comer of Newtown 
Rood and Westeyan Drive. Because 
of a cocqierative ^ort by die dty of 
Virginia Beach and the Breeden 
Companies, the center is q)«i 24 
hours a day, seven days a wedc 

The materials collected at the 
center will include aluminum bev- 

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erage cans, clear, green and brow., 
bottles and jars and PET (#1) and 
HOPE (#2) plasUcs. All materials 
should be clear. No lids are taken 
but labels are acceptable. Any other 
materials left at the drop-off loca- 
tion will be discarded. 

Virginia B^cli offers 70 newspa- 
per recycling locatiois at all public 
schools. They are open 24 hours 
per day. seven days a wedc. 

A good rule of thumb when 
recycling plastics in this area is to 
look for the recycling synfbol on 
the bottom on die container, either 
a 1 or a 2. and check for a seam and 
a spout. All other numbers, 3 
through 7, cannot be recycled at 
municipal programs, however, a 
few pivate vendors accept them. 

For your convenience and the 
convenience of other recyclers. 
please empty your containers. Liq- 
uids left in the containers attract 
insects and spraying insecticides to 
keep the insects away is not effec- 
tive. 

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Mayfest was held at One Columbus Center. 




Jeff Lawson, of WVEC television, cuts the birthday cake. 



More than 1 ,000 attend 
Mayfest in June Outing 

More than 1,000 people attended the Mayfest in June An- 
nual Outing, held recently at One Columbus Center in Pem- 
broke. 

Sponsored in part by the Hampton Roads Chamber of 
Commerce - Virginia Beach, the event featui^d "exhibits 
from various sectors of the business community," according 
to a chamber spokesperson. Food, beverages, prizes, a 
birthday cake, fashion show and a balloon drop wen also 
part of the fun. This year, Mayfest celebrated its 15th year. 



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One exhibitor was displaying baltoons. 




Sandra Parker, of WVEC televlston, signed autographs during Mayfest. 



> 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday, July 22. 1992 5 




l^ront row: J. Kyle Massey, Matt Kidwell and Cathy Kim. Sitting: Emily Letts: Carolyn Stamm, 
osach/teacher; and Derrldt Hunt. Standing: Kerrie Wudyka, Nick Branlgan, Ashley Lucente, 
Phrls Parker. Leslie Gregory, Kendall Wondergem and Zach Bradley. 

Old Donation students take top 
honors in probiem-soiving contest 



TUs article was submitted by the 
Old Donation Center for the Gifted 
and Talented for piAlication in The 
Virginia Beach Sun. 

Titttc groups of students partici- 
pating in the gifted program of 
Virginia Beach public schools re- 
cently received international recog- 
nition for their contributions to 
community problem-solving. 

Sixth-grade Old Donation Center 
students from Carolyn Stamm's 
classes, the GDC Toy Safety Task 
Force, won first place in the juni« 
division of the 1992 International 
Community Problem Solving 
Competition. 

Sixth-grade Old Donatkm Center 
students from Elizabeth Coyne's 
classes, the P.L.E.D.G.E.D. Team 
(People Loving Earth, Doing Great 
Ecological Deeds), won third place 
in the same international competi- 
tion. Students from Susan Puckett^ 
Special Projects for the Gifted class 
at Kempsville Junior High School 
won second place in the intermedi- 



ate division of the competition. 
Student groups from around the 
world entered this prestigious event. 

The CDC Toy Safety Task 
Force's purpose is to jnomote pub- 
lic awareness about toy safety in 
order to decrease accidents caused by 
unsafe toys. The Toy Safety Task 
Force introduced and successfully 
lobbied the Virginia General As- 
sembly to pass a state law (H.B. 
629 - The Toy Safety Monitoring 
Act), which states that doctors must 
fill out and file a form if a child is 
injured or killed by a toy. 

The task force wrote letters to 
senators and delegates, as well as 
members of the U.S. Congress. 
They wrote editorials and articles 
about toy safety and have appeared 
in several newspapers over the past 
few months. Mayor Meyera Obem- 
dorf proclaimed February, 4, 1992, 
Toy Safety Day in Virginia Beach. 
On that same day, the task force re- 
ceived a resolution from City 
Council supporting H.B. 629. Stu- 



dents were invited to Washington, 
D.C., and testified in front of a 
congressional subccMnmittee about 
a national toy safety bill. 

The P.L.E.D.G.E.D. Team's 
purpose is to increase the demand 
for recycled plastics and glass, so 
less of the materials that citizens 
recycle end up in landfills. The 
team has lobbied the presidents of 
Lego, Fisher Price, IBM, General 
Electric, Tyco, Whiripool and Ap- 
ple. Their purpose is to convince 
manufacturers to use recycled plas- 
tics and glass in their products, 
rather than virgin materials. At the 
invitation of Oberndorf, the 
P.L.E.D.G.E.p. Team presented 
their project during the recent Eanh 
Day Celebration at Mount Trash- 
more. 

At Earth Day and elsewhere 
around the community, students 
collected over 1,000 signatures of 
citizens who su|^rt the use of re- 
cycled materials in manufacturing. 



Front row: Lyndsay Mayer; Meredith Winters; Elizabeth Coyne, coach; and Melissa Wood. 
Middle row: Jennifer Allen, Liz Durham, John Stoneham and Annamarie Bautista. Top row: 
Jimmy Carter. Ricky Pratt, Danny Roberts, Danielle Bisset, Regina Barth, Catherine Imper- 
atore and Glen Sweitzer. 



The community problem ad- 
dressed by the Habitat Housewarm- 
ing project was how to publicize 
South Hampton Roads Habitat for 
Humanity, Inc., a non-profit orga- 
nization that builds houses for the 
economically disadvantaged, and the 
school district's Vocational Techni- 
cal Center that is presently building 
the fu-st Habitat House in Virginia 
Beach. The solution to their prob- 
lem was to hold a Habitat House- 
warming, a seminiff and mini-fair in 
honor of Habitat for Humanity. 

Guest speakers at this event in 
May included Congressman Owen 
Picketti John Wright, president of 
South Hampton Roads Habitat for 
Humanity, Inc., and Mary Watson, 
9 Habitat homesteader. A recogni- 
tion ceremony for the vo-tech stu- 
dents was also held at this time. 
Gifted students netted over $2,000, 
all of which was donated to South 
Hampton Roads Habitat for Hu- 
manity, Int. The seminar saw 500 
peq)le in attendance, the fair over 
1.000. thus assuring these students 
in audience for their public aware- 
ness campaign. 

All three teams recently attended 
the International Future Problem 
DSMOLD.PagtS 




Front row, left to right: T.J. Thomas, Adam Matheson, Jay 
Gutnick and Richard Bohman. Second row: Kris Duesberry, 
Eric Crpss. Matthew Sachs and Nicholas Grice. Back row: 
Rupa Chakrabortty, Ashley Leach, Joseph Duis and Drew 
Wallace. 



They are forwarding these petitions 
to the manufacturers who seem less 
than willing to consider the ideas of 
"a few kids." Stixlents have received 
endorsement from Obemdorf, Gov- 



ernor L. Douglas Wilder and the 
Caretakers of the Environment, In- 
ternational. At this time, IBM and 
Fisher Price are considering imple- 
menting the students' ideas. 




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Older smokers need to quit: No ifs, ands or butts 



Advice on good health is steadily 
mounting to show that it's never 
too late tv smdcers to quit When 



prople quit smoking, even after 
decades, the boieflts to their hearts 
and circulatory systems begin im- 



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Despite the clear health benefits 
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risk factor in eight of the top 16 
causes of death for oldo' Americans. 
Smoking is also the greatest cause 
of premature death and preventable 
disease and disability in the United 
States. 

Smoking poses special risks for 
older adults. In addition to causing 
cancer, heart disease and emphy- 
sema, and interfering with prescrip- 
tion medicines, it compIicafiBS a 
number of health inoblems associ- 
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The health , care costs older 
smokers incur as a result of their 
habit are profound. Experts esti- 
mate that older smokers incurred 
ahnt^t $5.67 billkm in health costs . 
in 1986. Medkare costs alone have 
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billion annually. 

The piobiem with planning quit- 
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research had been conducted that 
provided insights into the minds of 
older smokers. The 1988 "Clear 
Horizons" survey by AARP and the 
Fox Chase Cancer Center was one 
of the first to examine the smoking 
behavior and habits of older adults. 

The survey found older smokers 
tend to be more chronic, heavy, ad- 
dicted smokers than their younger 
counterparts. The older smokers in 
the survey had smoked toi an aver- 
age of 46 years and were smoking 
an average of 22 cigarettes a day. 

According to the survey, 65 per- 
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to quit smoking within a year. 
However, fewer than 40 percent of 
older smokers reported that their 
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The two most commonly cited 
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fear of gaining weight. 

One-fourth of the smokes in the 
survey reported they had tried to 



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Cbesapemke Bay 

In Vifyinia Beicb 

Seivii^ Lttoeh 4 DiaiMr Daib 

11:30 UB. to 10-JO p-m. LocbImmi 

top of tiM Lynnhav^ FImt oa thm 

ChMapeaka B«y, EHimv tMum and 

SUiflah BoMl • 4ai<000S 



quit More than half had tried to 
quit one to three times in their 
lives. The successful quitters had 
tried to quit a number of times be- 
f(Me they succeeded. The most suc- 
cessfiil quitting techniques inducted 
throwing cigarettes away and set- 
ting a quit day. 

Mwe than 90 percent of former 
smokers in the survey reported they 
had quit on their own. Their main 
reasons fw quitting included want- 
ing to stay in good health, follow- 
ing a doctor's advice, regaining 
control of their lives and making a 
k)ved me ht^ipy. 



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mmmmmmm 



< Vinrinia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 2Z 1992 



Watergate apartment's fire was "very hot" 



D ContlniMd From Pag* 1 

The cause of the fire, which 
CMsed $500,000 in stnKtura] dam- 
ag/t and $500,000 in personal ptop- 
eity dama^, is still unda investi- 
gation. 

Day was asleep when his smoke 
, alarm went off in his basement 
qMitment somewhere between 3 
and 3:30 a.m. Tuesctey momii^. 

"I didn't know what it was," he 
said. "I was Mill preuy much asleep 
when I got into the living room . . 
.1 saw flames right outside the 
wmdow." 

Day woke up his girlfriend and 
the two were ttR first ones out of 
the building. 

With help from a neighbor from 
aaoss the street, they tanged on all 
the i^artment doors, working their 
way up to the second and third 
floors of the building, while his 
girlfriend ran to the adjoining 
building to help her neighbors 
evaoiaie. 

Day said he didn't realize how 
serious it was until he reached the 
third floor, where the smckt was 
very thick. 

Day kicked the door to one 
apartment, because no one seemed 
to answer. 

"Which was a mistake," he said. 
It was very hot." 

As he ran back down ihe stairs of 
the burning building, a second floor 
resident jumped out the window. 

District Chief Jim Kellam of the 
Virginia Beach Fire Department 
said thtt the call f(»^ the two-alarm 
fire came in at 3:56 am. 



When the six pumper and two 
ladder companies arrived, along 
with additional support units, die 
fireffl»i made a search of ihe buikl- 
ings. 

Everyone was out, extxpt for 
Day's cat 

"Everything happcm 

for a reawm. Tm Jmt 

wondering wluit rea- 

ton this one was." 



Scott Day. Jin vtetbn 

"We thought the cat was dead, 
but the fireman pulled her out," 
Day said (tf Cleqxitra. "I didnt even 
know she was out here until a 
fnend came over and tc^ me the cat 
was over at a paramedic stttion." 
Day said she was takoi to the vet- 
erinarian, and is doing fine. 

But Cleopatra is one of the few 
bekmgin^ that was saved from die 
wreckage. 

"Everything's pretty much 
trashed from die sncdce." he lakL 

Most of the reildentt 

spent Wednesday and Thursday of 
last week salvaging what little they 
couM from dieir gutted apartments. 
Most of the damage was done to dte 
third floor apartments in Day's 
building, number 531. and the 
adjacent building's third floor 
iqjartmoits. 

"It was a situation with a build- 
ing whoe you've got a combiutibie 
exteriw. and it started outside die 



buiidnig. and spread iqi die outside 
of dw (stricture)." said Kellam. 
"When it got into Uie roctf lining, it 
1^ mto die attic. The sliding ^u 
doors eventually failed, which al- 
lowed the fire to get into die qjort- 
RMnta." 

The fire was brought under con- 
trol about 5 a.m., Kellam sakl. 

A member of Great Atlantic 
Propel^ Mani^emoit, who would 
not give his name, said his staff 
waked widi die lemmts to get diem 
reotablished ni odier qwtments as 
soon as possible. 

He nid die occupants ot eight 
apartments, including Day, were 
given available apartments. Two 
resiitents who were out (tf town at 
tte time (rf the fire woe returning 
10 Virginia Beach at die dme of die 
interview, and one num was still in 
die hospital. 

According to management, res- 
idents were given linens, pMs and 
pans and oUier qrare items, and 
were given fiimiture free for 60 days 
from a leasing company. 

Day said that while he had 
renter's insurance, many of his 
neighbors did not, and diey still 
need items such as furniture, 
ckMhes. shoes and odier itons. 

*lt seems like die whole complex 
got togedier," said Day. Muiy 
items woe donated to the bunwd- 
out fronilies widiin two days of die 
fire. 

Day has set up his new apart- 
moit, but said he found some in- 
teresting items as he went durough 
diewredcage. 
"My girlfrioid's purse was a 




Twelve units of Watergate Apartments on BIrdneck Road were destroyed In a recent fire, 
causing approximately $1 million in structural and personal property damage. 



melted plastic ball," he said. "We 
busted it open, and everydiing's 
pretty much alright - even a $10 
bill." 

His stoeo, however, wasi't as 
lucky. 

"I h«] a real nice stereo and en- 
tntainmoit center," he said. "But 
die stereo (plastk) melted right into 
die enteitainment cotter." 

Late last week, building in- 
spectors met witft management to 
determine die amount of rebuilding 
required, and an estimate is still 
unavailable. 

Great AUantic, however, plans to 
have die building restored and 
occupied within three to four 
months. 

"Everydiing happens for a rea- 
swi," said Day. "Tm just wondoing 
what reason this one was. 




Scott Day, 26. sits with the last of the salvagable items 
from his apartment, which was destroyed in the fire. 




Police Chief Charles Wall defends department's low arrest rate 



With our new Journey 

program, kids are in for some 

serious fiin this M. 

There's never been a better time for your child to experience 
^^^^^^^ the fun of learning than this fall at La Petite. 
JapuJlJJaV Because this year, ournew journey" 
&^^^^^ curriculum promises your child a set of 
P^*"**^" learning experiences that are specially created 
fw his CM- her age and level of development. 

Start your child cm the exciting journey of learning by enroling 
today at La Petite, If you huny, you'll receive a $50 tuition credit 
yA)en yw bring in this coupcm. 

We couldn't be mwe serious about the fiin of learning that is 

look — you can 
see it in our 
smiles. 



D ConUniMd From Pag* 1 

He said he has officers trying to 
"solve the problems in the 
community and not just do tickets 
and leave." As a result, fewer tick- 
ets and arrests are made, widi more 
cases being ckMed. 

Traffic summons are down 23 
potent, and Wall said he found 20 
percent of die total summons deal- 
ing widi radar, traffic lighu and 
stap signs. 

"And diose are the types of 
summonses that require an officer 
to qiend time dedicated at a certain 
location observing diat location and 
not moving from place to place," 
aud W«U. , VWedoa'thave die time 
to do diat. Our calls are up, I've 
got fewer people on die street. 
We're operating short-handed to 
start widi." 

Wall said his officers an spend- 
ing more time handling serious 
calls related to violent crime, but 
diat his staff is 38 people short. 
Including diose out widi injuries, 
disabilities <x illnesses, he is 50 to 
60 peofide short «i die street 

Wali aid felony arrests are up 



seven percent, but diat successful 
closures of all cases are up 17 per- 
cent 

"Even diough we're handling 
more of diem, we're solving mrae 
ofdiem,"hesaid. 

Wall said diat crimes committed 
by juveniles have increased, but 
tmancy abatemoit and odier qiecial 
programs have been implemented at 
die precincts. 

"A lot of our progeny crimes are 
juvenile-related. Our burglaries, 
larcenies, a lot of diat's juvenile re- 
lated," said Wall. "We're handling 
almost a third more juveniles dian 
we did diis same time last year." 

Another area where arrests are 
down by jibout 1420p are for 4ie 
drunk in pubflc charge. Wall said 
diat because die number of arrests 
are down, diis does not mean die 
problem is not addressed. 

"But if you look at diis year, 
we've really started to work widi 
our social services, our detox peo- 
ple. About 1,100 people were di- 
verted from jail to dieir program. 
So diat's of die 1,200 we're down, 
we actually handled almost 1,100 of 
diem," said WalL 



Hiose udcen to detox or diat were 
picked up tf die precincts received 
professional help radier than a 
criminal charge. 

•WcVe trying to work at solving 
dieir problems instead of putting 
diem in a revolving door - in die 
jail, out of die jail, in die jail," said 
Wall. "We're trying to work widi 
dwm. The system's trying to woric 
widi dicm." 

Wall said diat diese cases in 
which people are diverted from die 
jail and court systems are fa- a spe- 
cific reason. 

"You know, it's a problem dut 
dwy're dealing widi. Fm not talk- 
ing about die occasiomd, somebody 
goes out and has a party. Tm talk- 
ing about people who have a drink- 
ing pn^Iem and really need some 
help." said WaU. In addition, drunk 
driving arrests are increasing, and 
ateohd-related accidents are down. 

Wall said diat dK number of of- 
ficers working on more serious 



"We're a completely 
different police de- 
partment now. We've 
got different philoso- 

phiea. We're more 
community-oriented. 
We've got community 
atationa open now in 
three neigttborhooda. 
So we're more in- 



volved.' 



Vliylnla Beach PoUce 
Chi^CharUmWall 



crimes, dierefore, increases when 
they qiend less time issuing tickets 
and making arrests on less serious 
charges. 



Old Donation students win 



Police association members who 
conducted survey still won't respond 




By paymg ike refiiiniiaa fee by AaguM 14ih, 
your name will be eutoniMicilly entered into t (biwotg 

for POUR FREE WEEKS for one chiUf 
Hie drawint win be held u 12 noon on AuiuM 14th. 



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□ ContlniMd From Pag* 5 

Solving Conferoice at die Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin - Madison. TTiey 
presented dieir projects to an inter- 
national audience of over 1.500 
people, and receive their awards. 
Students also participated in a 
separate International Future Prt^ 
Ion Solving competition, and odier 
assorted activities designed to en- 
courage interaction ammg die in- 
tematicmally diverse groiq) of par- 
ticipants. 

The students are to be com- 
mended for dieir effects and dieir 
willingness to commit many hours 
beyond die school day m behalf of 
their community sovke projects. 

Students not included 

in the pictures appearing 
widi diis article are, from die Toy 
Safety Task Force. John Davis. 
Kempsville Elementary; Carissa 
Frasca, Rosemont Forest Elemen- 
tary; Allium LaUmde, I^vidence 
Elementary; Keidi MacDougall. 



We ve been in 
Tidewater Since 

1982. Let our 

experience work 

for you! 



FUEL INJECTION 



Brookwood Elementoy; Michelle 
Matdiews. Pembroke Meadows El- 
ementary; Paul Stettnisch, Birtfaied: 
Elementary; EKzabedi Tracy, Biid- 
neck Elementary; and Stephanie 
VanNostrand, Kingston Elementary 
From die P.L.E.D.G.E.D. Team, 
Kadierine Bill. Linkhom Park Efc- 
mentary; Stella Scott Bosworth. 
Linkhom Park Elementary; Chad 
Chandler, Trantwood Elementary- 
Scott Chapman, King's Grant Ele- 
mentary; John Crandley, LiiUchora 
Park Elementary; Headier Deliz. 
RosemcMit Forest Elementary; Anna 
DelMsantos. North Landing Ele- 
mentary, Ria Hagan, Trantwood 
Elementary; KrisUna Hastings, 
Kingston Elementary; Andiony 
Hickman, Trantwood Elementary; 
Malcolm Hutchins. Cooke 
Elemeniary; Samandia King. White 
Oaks Elementary; Kyle Korte, 
Linkhom Park Elementary; Kelly 
Mitchell. Trantwood Elementary; 
Sarah Reibcr. Rosemont Fbrcst El- 
emeniary; and Jesse Warren, King's 
Grant Elenmitary. 



By MJ. RICHARDS 
Virginia Beach Sun ^ff Writer 

The Policeman's Benevolence 
Associaticm and die Virginia Beach 
Police Sergeant's Associaticm bodi 
recendy conducted surveys among 
officers in die Viiginia Bea;h Po- 
lice Def»rtmenL The surveys ques- 
tion die efficiency and satisfaction 
among dw dqnrtment's (^cers. 

The Sergeant's Association sur- 
vey was distributed to 61 people, 
widi 44 returned, or 72 percent 

The Benevolence Association's 
survey was distributed to 489 non- 
ranking officers, widi 319 or 6S 
peicrat rttumed. 

The results of die survey, which 
were portrayed in a negative light, 
were leaked and published in The 



Virginia Beach Beacon, a tabloid 
insert to The Virginian-Pilot and 
The Ledger-Star. 

Police Chief Charies Wall and 
odier sources widiin die police de- 
partment have stated that not 
everyMie received die surveys. 

Sei^eant Nick Sitarski, president 
of die Sergeants Association, was 
out of town at die time die survey 
r^ls were distributed to die Bea- 
con. Sitarski could not be reached 
for comment on how die surveys 
were made or distributed 

Sergeant D.H. Hughes of the 
Fraternal Order of Police and 
Sergeant Bobby Madieson of die 
Policeman's Benevolence Associa- 
tion would not return a reporter's 
phone calls to discuss the issue. 



Idine Ghoreishian named 

1992 Elam outstanding volunteer 



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Back Bay group 
announce discussion 

The BKk Bay Restoration Fmin- 
dation will hold a qxcial roimdable 
discuKion cm W^biesday, August S 
at 7 p.m. at die Kempsville Li- 
br»y. 

The discussion will center on 
borow pits and dieir im|»ct on lo- 
cal w^ways. w«ct cpiality and die 
oivironmait. 

VarxNis city officials se expeoed 
lottiaid. 

Don Kain. w«er tex^Kt* man- 
ager, State Watn Cmirol Bnurd, 
will be die fettired spiNket. 

For more infomation call 427- 
0685. 



This article was submitled by the 
city of Virginia Beach. Public In- 
formjtion Office. 

Idine Ghoreishian is the 1992 
winn» of die DelHB Lee Elam Out- 
standing YcMith Volunteer Award. 
He volunteos as a litMary aide and 
technicim at the Bayside Branch. 

Ghoreishian was ban in Iran and 
came to this country nine years 
ago. He is a member of the Na- 
tional HcMior Soci«y, die German 
Club, die Key Club imd the Fnen- 
sics Cliri). He is an Eagle Scout skI 
plays die pitar. 

Ghexeishian is an iq^per classmai 
at Cox High School and an out- 
aaiKling volunteer u Bayside Area 
Library. He is a founding memb« 
of the Baysitte Library Youth 
Commission and has volunreer^ 
during our hiring freeze and many 
vacancies. He helped his urnimu- 
nity by assisting aides with solv- 
ing so ditt citizois cotM find die 



book they wanted in the cmrect a- 
der on the shelves. (Public satisfac- 
tion is impcHtant to Ghoreishian). 

Odier la^ GlK^eishian has per- 
fumed are deleting books from die 
library's daiat^se, completing cen- 
sus reports and repairing books. 
Ghoreishim was also a library ad- 
vootte and ^oke eloqucnUy befwe 
state legislators for increased fund- 
ing for public libraries diit>uglK}ut 
Virginia. 

During die first year he volun- 
teered, Iw assist^ widi die Summer 
Reading Club which gave many 
children the opportunity to 
strengthen dieir reading skills dur- 
ing their break from school. 

Ghoreishian is (kpendabie, accu- 
rate, omsideraie, versatile, efliciem. 
IRoductive, persm^k and a great 
a^ tt} our library. Ghweishian is 
a p»d lole model ^ his peers. He 
is iriways avail^le whoi we re<pie« 
hisesstffiice. 



mmmm 



wmmm 



wmmmmmmmmmm 



■■i 



74 Beach residents make the Dean*s List at Virginia Wesleyan College 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 22. 1992 7 



During spring semestn. 74 Vir- 
ginia Beach residents made the 



dean's list at Virginia Westeyan 
College. 



Beach cancer unit is awarded 



By GAILE HUDSON 
Special to The Virginia BoKh Sun 

The Virginia Beach Unit of Ae 
American Cancer Society recently 
received the lop state award in pub- 
lic education to a tobacco education 
prc^ram for eiemoitary school siu- 
dents. 

Betty Busciglio, of Virginia 
Beach, recently accepted the awad 
on behalf of tlu unit at the mnual 
meeting of the American Cancer 
Society; Virginia Division, Inc., 



Richm(Hid. She is first vice piesi- 
^t of the unit and chainnan of the 
unit's "Maldhg Strides" fuiKlraising 
event fot the past two yeius. Over 
250 volunte^s from around the 
state atimded the meeting. 

The unit's public education 
chainnan is Anna Pratt, a nurse 
with die Virginia Beach Health De- 
partment 

Busciglio and Teresa Brown, also 
of Virginia Beach, were elected to 
two-year terms as lay directors on 
die division's board of directors. 



More on Mayor's visit to Japan 



ContlniMdFromNgaS 

and then wait 100 years to getaretum 
on their investment The Japsiese 
have great patieiK« and diey bdieve 
vary stnmgly in loi^-range planning 
and long-range commitroenL 

Another diing that inq>ressed me 
about Japm is their pride in dieir 
histcHy and their ardiitectore. They 
uike such good care of all U ihdr 
buildings - both private and public. 
When I visited die home (tf the mayor 
of Miyazaki I learned tfiat his home 
was over 800 years olfl and yet it 
looked brand new. 

Housing is very costly in Japan. 
When you buy a home you not only 
indebt yourself, yoa indebt fiiture 
generations of your Eunily who live 
th^eandpayforit. 

I vts tho impresaed by the Jqn- 
nese media. When^we had a news 
conference, die media wNe all very 
polite. Wegotexcdlentcoveragein 
the newqMpwB of die siping of the 
Viiginia Beach-Miyazaki sister city 
agreement 

1 toured Mukogawa Women's 
University in Nishinomijw and was 
fascinated by what I law. Ilwyhave 
a boarding school for young gMa, a 
junior and seniw higli idKnl and the 
univers^. They hive a achcol of 
pharmacy and because I had men- 
timed diat my modier was a giadu- 
ate of die Medkal Cdlege of Vir- 



ginia and a roistered phuniacist 
diey couldn't wait to show diat off to 
me. 

I can't begin to tell you how com- 
fortable and how at home I fdt in 
J^MUi. My positive experience has 
caused me to talk about die J^Moese 
in every speech I've made across 
Virginia Beach and everywhere elae 
I'm invited. I was so impressed by 
their couilesy,dieirho8pita!ity,dieir 
woricediic and dieir long range plan- 
ning for the future. 

I UxA forward to a containing ex- 
change widi die peqile of Miytmdd 
- students, teachers and city onpioy- 
ees, as well as business leaders. Asa 
maiterof fact,9omeplansarealrcady ' 
in die worics. A delegation of city 
employees and citizens from 
Miyazaki was in Virginia Beach, 
b^inning on July 16. The group 
toured die Virginia Beach Qty Hall 
complex and met some oi our city 
emptoyees. They ttayed widi Vir- 
guiia Beach employees who hold 
aniilarjdM. This was an opportu- 
nity for a profesatonal exchm^ of 
idns and infonnation between our 
eropkiyees and die employees fifom 
Miyazaki I hope it will be one slqi 
in an <mgoing exchmge widi our 
new sister of Miyazaki. 

This article was compiled 
throi^h the courtesy cf Helen 
Spore, steff writer, PMic lifforma- 
tioH Office, city of Virginia Beach. 



Worried about America's future? 

ContlnuadPremPagaS 



points out diat die Ameriom 
concept of demooacy and free 
markets are being put in place by 
most governments around die 
world. 

With it! section on 
leadersUp. diis book is 

especially timely during die 
presidential campaign season. 
"The new assumption is diat an 
America moving into a new |4iase 
of its experience requires a new 
form of leadership. This new 
leadership is driven by die fact dat 
die informadon/wlsdom gi^ 
between leaders and led has been 
virtually eliminated • thanks to 
instant and universal information.'' 

He continues, "Hie core of die 
new leadership is vision. Vision is 
seeing beyond die immediacy of 

die day Vision is seeing whtt 

life could be like, while dealing 
widi life as it is. ..Vision is 
seeing die potential purpose hidden 
in die chaos of die momoit, yet 
which cold bring tobffth new 
possibilities for a peq^e." 

Only Ametki can provide the 
leadeiship required lor the new 
global oixier. "The new assumption 
is diat Amoican leaderdiip is 
pivotal to die emergence of 
whatever form of worid commu- 
nity ... aid diat futive pn^ress 
wiU recpiire toon dian the unilat- 
eral leadodiip diat, «saitiaOy^ 
Amoican efTectively emplcqred 
during die Coli War period." 

William Van Dusen Wishard is 
presidmt of WorldTrends Re- 
sesch mid, after two decades of 
gov»nn%nt service, is a reci^- 
nized audxxity on tfM changes 
reshqwig diegk^ Umdscape. An 
eariiaboak,A WwldmSe&chcf 
Meaning, summarized globd 
chm^ and was a best seller in 

Ji^MR. 

Tfmw^ioitt die l^Os, he was 
spexM vs&smx to die aecreouy 
and de^ity secretary (tf die UJS. 
Dqanmoit of Comment, is 
ciBTeMly a nmnber (rf die Hudson 
tastitme and a Aasoditt Felkw 

of New YoA'i Omega Gron>. 
The American Future (What 
Would Geor^ and Tom Do 
Now?) nay be ordered at $12 S5 
per atpyfrom The Congns^ma 
Institute. Inc.. 316 Pennsyhmida 
Avenue. SE MOS. Washington, 
D.C. 200(S w telephtme (^> 
547-4600. 



But Wishard does not agree widi 
diose who araert diat America is in 
^line. He gives hcqie for die 
future. Acknowledging die vast 
array of i»oblenis confronting 
Amoica, he cites polls which 
show ditt Amoican; are still 
proud (tf dieir country and willing 
to make sacrifices. Besi(te, he 



To earn itean's list status, a stu- 
dent must take a full-time schedule 
of 12 or sonester hours and earn at 
least a 3.S or betto- gra(te point av- 
Nageona4.00sale. 

Chaminie Mvie Amarasinghe, 
Nancy Lynn Armstrong, Melinda 
Kay Adicrafl. Conney Erin Baker, 
Kelley Anne BaldinelU, Cyndiia 
Nowakowski BatUstella, Mark 
Randall Blanchard. Klrby Ray 
Broyles, Patricia Anne Campbell, 
Nancy Marie Voi^le Carodiers, 
Debra-Lee Chandler. Sharon L. 
Bunn Clohessy. Troy Anne Ito- 
win, Terri L. Daughttid^. Vicki 
Leigh I^vis, Nicholas John De- 
Nunzio, Riu June Dill and Jana 
Marie Dom. 

Andrea Marie Elliott. Linda 
Michelle Failla, Achsa Elizabedi 
Fisher, Amy OoelbelbedcK, Rogw 
Thorpe Gregwy, Sheryl Hagberg, 
L<vi Lynn Hamilton, Kadiy Eileen 
Harrodcs. Wade Alouuider Hellman. 
Leonard L« Hemphill. Cadiy T. 
Hess, Tracy Swoope Hilker, Erie 
Hoyt, Gerald William Hudgins, 
Kimberly Elizabedi Jones. Carrie 
Charirae Jones, Kimborlea Kelle 



34 graduate from 
Radford University 

Thirty-four Virgiriia Beach resi- 
dents recendy graduated from Rad- 
ford Univertity at die end of die 
qxing semester. 

Receivmg bachelor of science de- 
grees were Roderick Zano, social 
science; Stacy L. Fling, psychol- 
ogy, Sean Atexander Lovas, psy- 
chtdQQr; Deshelle M. Peny, crinu- 
nal justice; Patrick D. Riendeau, 
political Kience; Kathleen Eliza- 
bedi Adams, art; Vicfawia Lynn 
Doughty, speech; and Lisa P. Har- 
mon, psychokigy. 

Also, Angela J. Hughes, middle 
education; Misty L. Newtown,' 
criminal justice; Stacy A. Ryan, 
criminal justice; Laurie A. Wible, 
early education; Michael A. In- 
guillo, history; Shannon L. Mur- 
ray, history; Virginia; Virginia M. 
Gallup, psychology; Tara Lee 
Thompson, history; Deborah Lynn 
Creams, reoeation and leisure ser- 
vices; ami Jennifi^ B. Blank, psy- 
chok^. 

Also, Andiiew W. Clemenu, 
psychology; Robert L Drain, 
speech; Kelly Marie Johnson, art; 
Carrie E. Simpson, social work; 
And Alllioa L. Had. English. 

Receiving bachelor of business 
admMstndon defroM were Jacque- 
line A. Drastal, finance; Jonadion 
M. Ettel. finance; Carrie L. Etton, 
management; William E. Dungan, 
finance; Bevin C. Oilteqiie, mar- 
keting; and Paul J. Bissett, mailat- 
ing. 

Receiving bachelor of aits degrees 
were Stephen E. Gibson, eco- 
nomics; Wendy A. Libbey. En- 
glish; Joseph B. Tennis, journal- 
ism; and Kdli M. Virostek, q>eech. 



Jordan. ChristO|Aer Robin Kelley, 
Patricia A. Fillmore Larson, Susan 
A. Wells Ligas, Shari ETlen 
Lindquist, Janice Elaine Ludwig and 
Coia Jean Mason. 

Amber Cawn Cannon Mathis, 
Roberta A. Mo^ser McCarraher, 
Melinda Dawn McCuiston, Susui 
Marie Metdcer, Janet Aiden Misi- 
aszek, Peggy Lynn Moccia, Linda 
Stoy Monroe, Dawn Michelle 
Moore, Katherine Iraie Myers, 
Rose Mary O'Neill, Rodney Gwme 
Obien, Magwet Joanne Paulenich, 
Melissa Dawn Pennell, Alice 
Palmer Polk. Jeny Michael Rabal- 
ais, Headier Lynn Rid^r, Stephen 
Christc^her Roberson, Krystine E. 
Hartz Sipple, Maureen Casey 
Smidi, Tamera Suzanne Smith, 
Anna Lois Burns Souders, Paula 
Jean Sparks, Danny Ray Tcrvol, 
Sandra Denise Thompson, Pamela 
Jean White Thornton, Tina Pilar 
Treptor, Cassandra Jeanne Tron- 
toski, Tasha Maryke Visman, 
Robert Stephen Weaver, Tamey 
marie Williams, Pamela A. Noyes 
Williams, Stephanie Ann Meyett 
Williamson and Rene Woods 
Woodall. 



[ 



PubHc NoHc« 



Tdce m^ce diat on Wednesday, 
July 22, 1992 from 9 a.m. to S 
p.m., Vi^nia Beach hfotor Com- 
pany at 1237 Oceana boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S4, 
will be tidcing bids on die follow- 
ing vehicle: 

1986 Dodge Daytona (NFCU 
Repo). Contact Bob Curling at 
428-2663. 

30.8 
lt7.22VBS 



Public NoHco 



Take notice diat on Wednesday, 
July 22, 1992 from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m., Virginia Beach Kfotor Com- 
pany at 1237 Oceana Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S4, 
will be taking bids on die follow- 
ing vehide: 

1991 Rird Thunderbird (NFCU 
Repo). Contact Bob Curling at 
428-2663. 

30-9 
lt7.22VBS 

PubHc NoHco 

VIRGINIA: In die Qerk's Office 
of die Circuit Court of die City of 
Virginia Beach. «i die I3di day of 
July, 1992. 

In re: A<k)fMion ftfAmber Nicole 
Wildennuth ^ ' - 

By: Bruce Todd Wildnmudi and 
Lisa Ann WUdennudi, Petitimiws 

To: Thomas M. Doak c/o Wild 
Cat Inn uid Tavon, Box T. Jack- 
son, NH 03846 

IN CHANCERY «CA92-13S 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came Brace Todd Wil- 
dermudi and Lisa Ann Wildomudi, 
Petitimers, ami represented dutt die 
object of diis proceeding is to effect 
die adtqition of the above named 
infant. Amber Nicole Doak. by 



CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION 

People's Banic of Virginia Beach 

Consolidated Report of CondUoo of PMpte's Bank of Virginia Beach, Vfrginia Beach, Virginia, at the 
close nX business on June 30, 1992 a state basking institutioB organized aad opcratbig under tiie bankbg 
-tavra of this state and a nemb«r of the Federal Reserve Systcn. PubHshcd in accordance witli a call made 
by the State Banking Authority and by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. 



ASSETS 



Dolar AhmnmiIi In ThauM^ 



1. Cub and Baluicei due from Depository Instilutianf: „ 

Nonintereat-bearing balmcai and cuneiKy and coin > 587 

2. Securities „ „ „ „ 5,213 

3. Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreemems to mell 560 

4. Loans and lease finandng receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned income ~ 8,973 

b. LESS: Altowance for loan and lease losses .^ 265 

c. Net k>ans and leases „ 8,708 

5. Assett hdd in trading accounts 

6. Premues and fixed assets _ 1,171 

7. Other real estate owned „ „. „ ; 

8. CXha Assets ......254 

9.TbtalasseU '.. - ; 16,4«3 

UABnJTIES AND EQUITY CAPITAL 

10 Dq»osits:... „ 15<<00 

a. Noninlerest-bearii^ „ 2,224 

b.Interest-be«ing ^ 13,176 

11. Federal Amds pwdiased and secivities sold under agreements to tqnirchase « 

12. Other UaWUties ..„ „ ..96 

13.TottlUrfjiUtiM 15.496 

14. Common Stock „. „„ .„ _ .'. 2.000 

IS.Siophis.. „ u „ \,961 

16. Undivided Profits and Capital Reserves (2,970) 

17. Total Equity Cental — „ — . .997 

18. Total LiafaiHiies, and E^n^C^Mtal „ „ 16,493 

I, Than» E FkMBiden, m, Eastern and Chief Executive (Xfioer, of die d)oveHianMd bank, do hoeby decUire that Ois 

^iM of Cmidilion h« been pivpeed m cmdooiinoe widi the insinictions tasued fay die B(MBd of Ot>veiBon of the Fednal 

Roovc System and Ihs SiMB Banidi« Atthority nd is.mie to die beat of 1^ knowledge and b^ef. 

TIKM4AS E. FLCKM)ERS, m 

PRESIDENTS CEO 

We, the imdersigned dbvoni, Mest 10 the oMTCCtaaaa ^ tto Rq»rt of Cmditkm Bid decloe diat k has baaa txMnined by 

w and 10 te beat (tf ow knowle(%e and belief baa bam prqioed in eonfamanoe «ddi die iasffue&mi iaraad by fte Bovd 

of Oovemors of the l^ederal Reserve Symm and dM Bureau of f^nmcial hstftutians and is tiae nd oona^ 

iCenn^E.Mdbcm 

KnawthV.Cksoe 

WlUBmF.Hu(^tas,ir. 

Macttn 

State <tf VkgUa Oqt of Vii^ria Beadi as: S wem to and sidwerflMd b^oie ma ^ 30ih day (^ ^^piO, 1992. 

KATHRYNL. ROWLAND 
l^&MtyP^ie 

My CoRunMoe Ei^Ns: i^ril 14, 1994 



Bruce Todd WildomuUi and Lisa 
Am Wildermudi, husband and wife, 
and afMavit having bera made and 
filed that Hiomas M. Doak, a 
nauoal parent of die said chikl, is a 
non-resident of die State of Vir- 
ginia, the last loiown post office 
address being: c/o Wild Cat Inn and 
Tavern, Box T, Jackson, NH 
03846. 

It is therefore Ordered that die 
saki Thomas M. Doak appear before 
tills Court widiin ten (10) days after 
publication of diis Older and indi- 
cate his/her attitude toward die 
proposed adqition, or odierwise do 
what is necessary to protect his/her 
interest in diis matter. 

It is Amber Ordered diat a copy of 
tills Order be published once och 
week for four successive wedcs in 
die Virginia Beach Sun, a newqia- 
|xr of general circulation in- diis 
city. 

A copy teste; 

J. Curtis ftult. Cleric 

By: Rhonda V. Tynes, D.C. 

Bardey F. Tudiill, IV, p.q. 

30-7 

4ti-12VBS 

Puiallc NoHc» 1 

In die Clerk's Omce of die Cir- 
cuit Court of die City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 17tii day of July, 
1992. 

RACHEL M. RIVERA. Plain- 
tiff, against 

HECTOR J. RIVERA, Defen- 
dant 

Docket lfCH92-lS13 
ORDER OF PUBUCATION 

The object of diis suit is for die 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from die said 
defendant, upon die grounds of liv- 
ing separate and apart for six 



nwnthSt having no children and 
having ent«ed into a sepvttion 
apeemniL 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed diat the defoidant is 
not a resident of die State of 
Viq;ima, die last Imown post of^ 
address being 25 Castelv, Rota, 
Spain. It is ordered diat Hector J. 
Rivera (to vppex on or before die 
8di of S^Hember, 1992, and do 
what may be necessary to protect 
his interest in diis suiL 

It is fiodier Ordered diat a copy of 
dus Order be published once e^h 
week for four successive weeks in 
the Vi^ia Beach Sun, a new^- 
per of genial circulation in diis 
city. 

A copy — Teste: 

J. Curtis Fniit, Oerk 

By: Linda D. Jones, D.C. 

William R. Brown, p.q.. 

716 Cumberland Avenue 

Portnnoudi, Virginia 23707 

30*6 
4t-8-12VBS 



Pubile NoHc* 



] 



Auction: 1985 Buick Somerset 
#5798 

Serial Number: #IG4NJ27U8F- 
M424501 

Auction date: August 4, 1992 

Time: 1 1 :00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy.. Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves die Tight to Bid. 

30-1 
It7-22VBS 



PubHc Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH . 

□ Contlnuad On ftg* • 



Pick Up The Virginia Beach Sun 
At Any Of These Locations: 



Dr.VMeo 

Aragona Boulavatd 

Open Houaa Dinar 
106 /^ragona Boulevard 

Super Rash 
Rosamorrt Road 

The Sun BulMIng 

138 South Roaamont Road 

IMarkftplaoa 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Pw^lM Drug Stor* 

Hilltop 

Ravco Drug 

Hilltop 

Vh-glnia Beach 
Qanarai HoapKal 
Rrst Colonial Road 

Hasa's Sub Shop 

Great NackVtIlaga 

Super Fnsh 

Hilltop Plaza 

Holiday Food atora 

General Booth Boulevard 

Thomas Murphy 

1000 Pacific Avenu* 

17th ^sat&irf Shop 

Pacific Avanua 

Box on %aat 
17th Street 

Sir Aflon Inn 

1 9 Ii4editerranean Avanua 

Aquariua Motal 

1909 Atlantic Avenue 

Comfort Inn 

2015Mlantk;Avanu« 

Oosan Holiday 

2Sth nn6 Atlantk; Avsnus 

PostOfflos 

Atlantic Avanua 

Ingram Phamwcy 
2Sth & Oceanf tont 

Prineess Anns MoM 

Kth and Ocsanfront 

Ssshawfc Motal 

^di and Oosanfront 

Ths Bowdwalk inn 

2604 Atlmtk: Avsnus 

Sssgull Motel 
27di and OoswifroM 

VklngM^ICwp. 

2700 Mlwillc Avsnus 

MardtOrMilbM 

28(ffiAd«itle Avsnus 

Oo ss n lrent fcin 
27M and OosanfroM 



Dayakm 

Atlantic Avsnus 

Ssa Vaeatlonsr 
Flight of 34th Strest 

islvsdsrs Rssort Motsi 

36th wid Oosanfront 

OnThtSb'sst 

Atlantio Avsnus 

Waffls's'n Things 
Comer of Padfle Avsnus 
and JLaakin Road 

ParmPrssh 

Virginia Bsach Boulsvard 

Phw-Mor 

Rsgsncy Hilltop 

. Tsxaoe Food Mart 
1912 Uskin Road 

Paopiss Drug Stors 
980 Laakin Road 

TlM isaeli Pub 

1001 Laakin Road 

Shaps's Sakm 
\W& Laakin Road 

Bslo SupsrmarkM 
London Bridge Shopping Ctr. 

Hilltop Inn 
1284 Laakin Road 

MarksiplBos 

1284 Laskin Road 

Farm rrssti 
Laakin Road 

Markstplaos 
Laskin Road 

Pood Uon-OutM Mall 

Vkghiia Bsach Boulsvard 

Arty'aDsllRsirtaurant 

Loshmwina Plaza 

Ctnmbsr of Commsres 

V^inla Bsach Boulevard 

\ArgNa Bsach Boulsvard 

Food Lion 

PsnfAmks Mall 

FarmFrasli 

kidspsndsncs Boulsvard 

Psopiss Drug ^ors 

10^ bidspsoMncs Boutovard 

Bsto 

^torthan^jlon Boulsvard 

CrM^hm 
NoitlMmplon Boulsyani 

Fooo Lion 

NMvtoam Road at Bakar Road 



ThB Virginia Baaeh Sun 

For Hmte Dettmy, News Or Advertising, 



i 



■^^^ 



i«MRiP 



mmmmm 



g VifRinia Be«:h Sun. Wednesday. July 22. 1992 




WEALTH'S ATTORNEY 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Auotney 
Municipil Center 
Virginit Beach, Vbfinia 234S6 

30-3 
4IS.12VBS 



c 



PubNcNoRc* 



Brian Jones 



RarxJy Renard 



Bobby Holland 



Eastern Surfing Association's 
surfing series now underway 



ByGREGHEMMINGS 
Special to The Virginia Beach Sun 

The Eastern Surfing Association 
started this summer off with a bang 
by once again providing local 
surfers with the chance to compete 
in various surfing contests 
throughout the summer, beginning 
with the most recent event at Avon, 
N.C. 

These events are sponsored by the 
Eastern Surfing Association and 
organized by Paul West, the area 
director for ESA. Even though Paul 
is certainly credited for organizing 
these events, if it were not for the 
support of area sponsors such as 
17th Street Surf Shop. Morcy 
Boggie, Wave Riding Vehicles and 
others, these contests would not be 
possible. 

The ESA provides area young 
people a unique chance to irartici- 
pate in an organized ^rt diat pro- 
motes good sportmanship, envi- 
ronmental awareness and excellence 
in education. Parei^ts also con- 
tribute their time to/ the organiza- 
tion by helping with contests re- 
sults or just being in the cheering 
section for their own son or daugh- 
ter. A newsletter containing 
upcoming events is available. 



The recent event at 
Avon saw some real talent begin 
to unfold as each division put forth 
their best effort to rack up as many 
points as possible. There were 48 
heats over a two-day period, with 
many events requiring a semi-final 
and final evm. The waves at Avon 
were, as always, consistent with the 
occasional large set coming in ev- 
ery once in a while. 

There were so many area surfers 
entered in the contest that there are 
too mffliy to name, but here a few: 
In the juiMor longboard competition 
- Fleet Martineue, Ian Israeli, Trux 
Midgett, Charlie Vogt, Jason 
Heilig. Jeff Myers. Chris Todd, 
Barrett Holland and Jimmy Baart 

In the grand master's division - 
George Esgain, Bob White, Mike 
Cannon, Jett Colonna, Dutch Mal- 
oney and Jim Martinette. 

The next event will be held on 
July 25 and 26. Contest entry 
forms are available from area surf 
shops. Anyone wanting to become 
involved with the ESA, please 
ccmtact Paul or any othef member. I 
wish such an organization was 




Fleet Martinette 




Paul West. EEA 
Virginia director 



available when I was a Grpminet 20 
years ago, teaching myself lo surf 
on the beach break at Daytona . . . 
well, that's another stwy. 
Contact a local surf shop for de- 
tails. 



D Continued From Paga 7 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIR- 
GINIA V. 

$720.00 UNITED STATES 
CURRENCY 

DOCKET* CL92-624 

TO: KENNETH D. REID 

2718 LEO STREET 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honorable Court to forfeit to 
the Comtnonwealth of Virginia 
$720.00 United States Currency 
that was seized on February 8, 1992 
from Kenneth D. Reid. 

AN Information was made, 
sifened and filed with the Circuit 
Court Clerk's Office on March 6, 
1992 on the above matter. Said in- 
formation stated the owner of the 
currency and the last known addxess 
of the owner at the time the Infor- 
mation was filed. 

It appearing that the whereabouts 
of Kenneth D. Reid is currently 
unknown, and that a registered letter 
has been mailed to nis last known 
address, it is hereby ORDERED, 
that all parties appear on or before 
August 10, 1992, and do whatever 
is necessary to protect their interest 
in said properties. 

It is further ORDERED that this 
Order of Publication be published 
once a week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia BejK;h Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach. 

ENTER this 8th day of July, 
1992. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk of Circuit 
Court 

By Barbara S. Murden, Deputy 
Clerk 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

KAREN L. LINDEMANN 

DEPUTY COMMON- 

WEALTH'S ATTORNEY 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Attorney 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 
30-2 
4t8-12VBS 

Public Notice j 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIR- 
GINIA v. 

ONE MOTOROLA PAGER 

ONE 1989 HYUNDAI SONATA 

$500.00 use 

DOCKET#CL92-523 

DOCKET* CL92-521 

DOCKET* CL92-487 

TO: BOBBY JOHN TODD 

717 GUY AVENUE #13 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

ESTATE OF LEONARD H. 
ORE 

2838 TEMWATER imiVE 

NORFOLK, VIRGMA 

nunPROFPUBUCATION 
THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Cwnmwiwcalth and moved 
this HoKwabte Coin to forfeit to 
the Commoi»w«iIth of Virginia 
One Motorola Pager, One 1989 
Hyundai Sontta and SSOO.OO Uitfted 
States CurreiKy that was xixsd on 
January 28. 1992 fitwi Bdtkff J<*« 



Todd. 

Informations were made, signed 
and filed with the Circuit Court 
Clerk's Office on February 27. 
1992, March 1 1, 1992 and February 
27, 1992, respectively, on the 
above matters. Said informations 
stated the owners of the properties 
and the last known address of the 
owners at the time the Informations 
was filed. 

It appearing that the whereabouts 
of Bobby John Todd is currently 
unknown, and that a registered letter 
has been mailed to his last known 
address, it is hereby ORDERED, 
that all parties appear on or before 
August 10, 1992, and do whatever 
is necessary to protect their interest 
in said properties. 

It is further ORDERED that this 
Order of Publication be published 
once a week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach. 

ENTER this 8th day of July, 
1992. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk of Circuit 
Court 

By Barbara S. Murden, Deputy 
Clerk 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

KAREN L. LINDEMANN 

DEPUTY COMMON- 

WEALTHS ATTORNEY 

Office of the Commonwealth's ■ 
Attorney 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 

30-4 
4t8-12VBS 



once a week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach. 

ENTER this 8th day of July, 
1992. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Cleric of Circuit 
Court 

By Barbara S. Murden, Deputy 
Cleric 
I ASK FOR THIS: 
KAREN L. LINDEMANN 
DEPUTY COMMON- 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY bF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIR- 
GINIA v. 

$1855.00 UNITED STATES 
CURRENCY 

DOCKET* CL92-1 156 

TO: MICHAEL WILLIAMS 

1605 MARCIANO DRIVE 

PORTSMOUTH. VIRGINIA 
ORDER OP PUB^CATIQN 

THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honoratrie Court to forfeit to 
the Commonwealth of Virginia 
$1855.00 United States Currency 
that was seized (»i March 27, 1992 
from Michael Williams. 

AN Information was made, 
signed and filed with the Circuit 
Court Clerk's Office on April 27, 
1992 on the above matter. Said in- 
formation stated the owner of the 
currency and the last known address 
of the owner at the time the Infor- 
mation was. filed. 

It appearing that the whereabouts 
of Michael Williams is currently 
unknown, and that a registered kaet 
has been mailed to his last known 
address, it is hereby ORDERED, 
that all parties appear on or before 
August 10, 1992, and do whatever 
is necessary to protect their interest 
in said pn^pertiei. 

It is further ORDERED that this 
Order of Publication be published 
once a week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
the City of Viifinia Beach. 

ENTER this 8th day of July. 
1992. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk of Circuit 
Court 

By Barbara S. Murden, Deputy 
Cleric 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

KAREN L. LINDEMANN 

DEPUTY COMMON- 
WEALTH'S ATTORNEY 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Attorney \ 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 
30-5 
4t8-12VBS 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIR- 
GINIA V. 

$87.00 UNITED STATES 
CURRENCY 

$425.00 UNITED STATES 
CURRENCY 
DOCKET* CL92- 16 
DOCKET* CL92-15 
TO: WAYNE A. BARCLAY 
714 20TH STREET *101 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23451 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honorable Court to forfeit to 
the Commonwealth of Virginia 
$87.00 United States Currency and 
$425.00 United States Currency 
that was seized on November 12. 
1991 from Wayne A. Baclay. 

Informations were made, signal 
and filed with the Circuit Court 
Clerk's Office on January 2, 1992 
on the above matters. Said 
informations stated the owno^ of the 
currency and the last known ^dress 
of the owner at the time the Infor- 
mation was filed. 

It ap^icmixg that the whereabouts 
of Wayne A. Barclay is currently 
unknown, and that a registered letter 
has been mailed to his last known 
address, it is hereby ORDERED, 
that all i^uties appear on cm- bef(»-e 
August 10, 1992, and 6o whatever 
is necessary to protect Ihcir interest 
in said properties. 

It is further ORDERED th« this 
OMer of Publication be injblished 



NOTIFICATION TO BIDDERS 

Sealed Bids will be received at the Virginia Oepartnient of 
Transportation, Central Office Auditorium, 1221 E. Broad St.; 
the Plan Rm.. 12 th Floor. Annex Bkjg., 1401 E. Broad St.; and 
the parking lot Security Sta., located between the Highway 
BMg., 1221 E. Broad St., and the newly renovated Highway 
BIdg., 1201 E. Broad St., Richntond, Va., until 10 A.M., EDT, 
Wednesday, July 29. 1992, and will be opened in the Central 
Office Auditorium, 1221 E. Broad St., Richmond, Va., for the 
construction of: 

Job Das. 11 2-92A -Rta. 654 (Barracka Rd.) -Albarmarla Co. -0.269 Mi. 
Grading, Drainage, Asphalt Cone. Pava., Incids. & Signala 

Job. Des. 113-92A -Rte. 604 -Buchanan Co. -0.8 Mi. LS. Qrading, 
Drainage & Asphalt Cone. Pava. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job. Das. 114-92A -Rta. 616 -Buchanan Co. -0.7 Mi. US. Grading, 
Drainage & Asphalt Cone. Pave. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATK}N) 

Job. Das. 1 1 5-92A -Rta. 61 8 -Charlaa City Co. -1 .227 Ml. LS. Grading, 
Drainage & Asphalt S.T. Pava. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Das. 116-92A -Rta. 661 -Dickanson Co. -0.14 Ml. LS. Grading, 
Drainaga & Asphalt Cone. Pava. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Das. 117-92A -Rta. 619 -Dinwiddia Co. -0.945 Mi. LS. Grading, 
Drainage & Asphalt Cone. Pava. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Das..118-92A -Rta. 601 -Fluvanna Co. -0.319 ML Qrading, 
Drainaga, Asphalt Cone. Pava. & Drainaga Str. (MINIMUM 
PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Des. 119-92A -Glansida Dr. -Hanrioo Co. -Turn Unaa, Retaining 
Walls & Signs (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATK)N) 

Job Des. 120-92A -Rta. 600 -Isia of Wight Co. -0.605 Mi. L.S. Grading. 
Drainaga & Asphalt Cone. Pava. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATKJN) 

Job Des. 121-92A -Rtas. 621 & 803 -Laa Co. -2.4 ML LS. Qrading, 
Drainaga & Asphalt S.T. Pava. 

Jobbas. 123-92A -Rta. 687 -Madison Co. -0.423 Mi. Qr^lng, Drain- 
aga, Asphalt Cone. Pava. & Incida. 

Job Das. 124-92A -Rta. 265 -Pittsylvania Co. -Conatr. 8 Bra. 

Job Das. 125-92A -Rtaa. 695 -Smyth Co. -0.044 Mi. L.S. Qrading. 
Drainaga. Asphalt S.T Pava. & 2 Bra. (MINIMUM PREOUALIFKJATKDN) 

Job Das. 126-92A -Commutar Parking Lot -Staflord Co. -Qrading. 
Drainaga. Asphalt Cone. Pava.. IncWa. & Lighting 

Job Das. 1 27-92A -Rta. 613 -Surry Co. -Drainaoa Str. at Bailay Branch 
(MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Das. 128-92A -Rta. 667 -Tazawall Co. -2.2 Ml. L.S. Qrading. 
Drainaga & Asphalt S.T. Pava. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Das. 129-92A -Rta. 1030 -Tazawall Co. -0.915 Mi. LS. Qrading. 
Drainaga & AsphaK Cone. Pava. (MINIMUM PREQUALIFICATION) 

Job Das. 130-92A - Port Republic Rd. -City of Harriaonburg -0.43 Mi. 
Grading. Drainage. Asphalt Cone. Pava., Utilitias, Signala « IneWa. 

Tha Department assures compUanca with TItto VI requirements of 
non-dlscriminatk)n in all aclivities pursuant to ttiia advertiaemant. 

NOTE: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE CONTRACT 
ENGINEER. 



CAl) network J 
I CLASSIFIEDS ^ 

BUNKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published In 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $175. 

(For nfiore tlian 25 words tliere is an additional 
charge of $6.00 per word.) 

Call 547-4571 for Classified Representative 



ALISUM a WOLFF TANNINQ BEDS 
■NtwConynwdal-HonwUnlnFioin 
I1M.00. Lairpi -Lo(lon*-AccMto- 
llH. Monthly Paymanti Low at 
l1t.00.CMTodv FREE NEWColar 
CMIg«. 1-a00-22l-«2«. 

COMPIETELY FINISHED HOMES 
buHt on your M. No monoy down. 
BulMar panldptflon with dMlng 
ooiti. Thirty ptivn to ehooM Irom. 
Ton-yvar H.O.W. Wirranty. Singlo- 
dlgH flnandrfg ram. Cill AMERI- 
CAN FAMILY HOMES. Richmond 
1/I00-4M-731 0. et Fradorickiburg 
1/SOO-4SB-7320. 



CDLroqulrod. 1-80&48M76B. TRI- 
STATE MOTOR TRANSIT CO. 
McQII SfMcial Swvlcai. 

AVIATION MAINTENANCE ■ Train- 
ing, FAA Csflilled -Financial Aid 
Navy Tulllon Atdgt t Vtlarana 
Banaflti Approvad-Placanwnt As- 
•lalanc*. RICE AVIATION -5202 
W. Mlinvy Hwy. Hangar 7 Chaia- 
paaka. VA. 23321 (804)465-2813. 

Ford Trucks -All brand naw92'i call 
lor a factory Invoice prica quota 1- 
800-885-9575 racofdad maaaaga. 
Tann. MotorCo. Johnaon City, Tann. 



Call Thomas Realty, 1-800-846- 
0«45. 

MYRTLE BEACH, 8.C. -Luiury 
ocaanfront/ocaanvlaw Condomini- 
ums. 2 Badroomftiath, priyala bal- 
cony, CCTV/HBO, kKchana, pools. 
Eicallant ralas. OcaantrorK Vaca- 
tion Rentals. Free Brochure. Call 1- 
800-247-5459. 

Own and oparalaaroulaof America's 
leading snack machines. Console 
33 machine route eatabllshad lor 
you. n,98O.0Oinvastmanl raqulrad. 
1-800-344-3251, 



AMERICAN RETIREMENTHOMES WATERFRONT -Lake Gaslon.V A. A PERFECTWEODINQ In SMOKY 
■|1,000». Includes room, board, Large k>I. 1 hr. south ol Rk^imond, MOUNTAIN WEDDING CHAPELS. 
uHmiaa, 24 hr. nurse aaslsled am- Easy accaas from 1-95, 1-85 A US Everything provided. Moal raason- 
bulalory'non-ambulalory care. 58. Near QoM 1 MadkaL Financ- ablaprlcet. Photos, Videos. Music, 
Charlollasvllla, Lexington, Norfolk, Ing. 804-496O320, Flowers, Limo, Cabins. Call us bo- 

VA Beach. CUHon Forga, Emporia. lore deciding. 1 -800-282-5683. 

South HHL Tappahannock, Ports- Truck Orlvars ■ 1 yr.° sup. -up lo 

mouth, Qloucaster, VA., also 28*/ml. to start. Choose van or llal. POSITIONED FOR SUCCESS - 
Panaacola. FL. 1-8aO-99ft-6637. Tultlon-traa training lor those w/no WeVe Got It I Quality Products, Ora- 
a>p.G(aatbanalils.CallPoole Truck malic Sales Strategies, an aatab- 
FRIENOLY HOME PARTIES has Line 1-800-553-9443, Oapt. W-70. Ilshsd, Internationally respacted 
■paiAiga)ordamonstralors.Nocash name.Thatmeanslrsmandouasalas 

lnyaamwM.Nosarvloacharga.Hlgh MAKEAFRIEN0..,FORLIFEIScan- andlnsurancscarsergrowlhloryou 
eonmlaalan and hoslass awards, dinavlan, European, Yugoslavian, as a sales manager trainee. Leads 
TwBcatatooa.ovarSOOHams.Call South American, Japanese High furnished. Openings In all VAcoun- 
1-80O-4S8-487S. School Eichange ties. Send resume' to CICA. 6620 

Stu(iants...ArrhrlngAugusl...HOST W. Broad Street, Rk^mond, Vlr- 
MyitoBaach RESORT VACATION FAMILIES NEEOEDI American ginia 23230, Attn: Al Abbamonte or 
RENTALS -Oceanfront condos, Intarculturai Student Exchange. Call CallB00-4S1-225S. 
houa«kaaplnglncki)M.lndaer/out- lrene(804)746-84l6or1-B00-SIB- 

door pools, whirlpool*, sauna*, LINQ. WEST OF RICHMOND -35 miles. 

lgM*dl*nnl(OOun*,pultlnggr«*ns. Complately remodeled homo with 

ael(0acki4e*av(lliblo. Fiaebro- Drivers -TAKE CHARGE. ..of your large deck, large private yard with 
ohuro: 140O-448-S653. career and your life. Drive for J.B. carport. Quest House, and work- 

Hunt and earn top pay and ben- shop. Photos upon request, $89,900. 
DONATE YOUR CAR. Truck, efHa. We pay for your OTR expert- 804-767-4795. 
Molorhofflo, Boat, Roal Estate anca -up to S0.28 per mile. 1 -800- 

Slarrtia,Colr«,Colectblaa,loFoun- 2JB-HUNT. EOE/Sub|acl lo drug Military Retiree -Champus suppla- 
ddlon Serving the BUndl.R.S. lax screen. mem will pay the 25% allowed, 

daducUbi*. FREE TOWING: NEED plus100% ol all excess charges, 

NOT RUN 1 -•00-326-5922, LOG HOME DEALERS WANTED. For brochures call 1-800-627-2824 

High Commissions. Training Semi- aiL 259. 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR nars, In-houss Financing. No Fran- 
THE SELF-EMPLOYED. Finally - chiseFees.HonestAbeLogHomas. 
AI(0(dat)la.Cas^EII*ctlv• Hospital Route One, Box 84CVD. Moss, 



CAMPBELL COUNTY: RETIRE 
MENT, HUNTING, INVESTMENT. 



Insuranoe*, Self Emplayed/Small Tannassee3S57S.(800)231-3895. 136acr**wJthhouse,alrslrlp,woods, 
Bu*ln**«*a.A00ITONAL140ban- . creaks: t1 19,900. Tracts: 34 acres 

*fllslCALLTOOAYI1-80O42»4672 ATTENTION: ExcellenI Income for $29,900,51 acres $58.000. 72 acres 
('Undarwrltar PFL LIFE) homeasserrblywork. 504-646-1700. $65,900, 81 acres $125,000. Dk;k 

$28.95 fee. required for directory. Somazz* 1 ■800-553-27^2. Freda 
WE BUY MORTGAGES And Trust Dept. P919. Yeatts Real Estate. 

Deed*. Old You Sell Proporty? Re- 

«*lvlngPayinaMs7WhyWWIIFasL Become a Paralegal. Join DRIVERS -Minimum age 23.1 year 
Cat) Nowl Any Size -NatkxiwWe. Amerlca's's fastest growing proles- over the road. Rkjing program. Good 
arMPrio*a.Calll-800-6Se-CASH sk>n. Work wflh altorneys. Lawyer pay and benefits wllh coinnerclal 
(2374). Mortgages Buyers ol InitruOed home study. The finest drivers license. 27c 10 start, 
Aimrloa. paralegal program availabla. Free McClendon Trucking. 1-800-633- 

catak)gue, 1-800-362-7070. Dept, 7233, 
WHITEWATER RAFTING, West LH73a02, 

Virginia-* Now and QauloyRhrera. PIONEER STEEL BUILDINGS - 

July ipeclal*. Can today for free GASTON LAKE -VA/NC 1-800-338- 24x30x10 $3,595.00: 30x40110 - 
brodiuro -1-SO0-833-RAFT. Drirt- 88ie.FresLakeMapmuyersQukJa. $4,650.00; 30x60x12 -$6,695.00; 
A4l.lnc.,P.O.Ba«886,Fayan*vlie, Over 75 waterfront lots, houses, 40x75x12 -$8,895.00; 50x100x14- 
WV28«40. etc. CallAwrlla Tanglewood Really $13,395.0O:80x100i14-$21,9e5.0O. 

(804) 636-2204. Box 116. Bracay, All Six** Eractkm AvaMabi* Mini- 
Oot a campground membonhip or VA 23919. Storage 1-800-637-5414. 

limaaharo? Warn lake It. America's 

msstsuooaaslulresortraaaleclear- "LOG HOME DEALERSHIP" Top CEMETERIES -Greenwood Memo- 
InghovM. Call Resort Sale* Inter- Log Home Manufacturer, seeks rialQardens.Rk:hmond,VA, needs 
maion Ion free hotline 1-800U23- Dealer, Protected territory, high 1 at-naed counselor. Past experl- 
5987. oarnlngpotentlal.fulltrainingt leads ence In pro-need sales a must. For 

provided. Need not Inlerfere with confklenilal Interview, please call 
SIngia drfvars can EARN UP TO praaont amploymenl. Models start- 804-784-5214 MonorTues. 9-4:30, 
33(PERMILE.Ourhighvolumea( Ing at $9690. 1-800-264-LOGS ask for Mr. Allen. 
ov*rdlnian*ional,flalbed,drcp-deck (5647) "BRENTWOOD LOG 

Iralght anabia* you to earn these HOMES, 427 River Rock Blvd.. NEW LOG HOME -Massanullan 
Icpwagos. EXTRA PAY for special Murlraesboro. TN 37129. Village. Four Season Reson. Large 

servlcaamaaiN you make ovan mora deck, spectacular mountain view, 

meneyl AND RECEIVE DAILY NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL Twohugebadrooms,l{replaca,base- 
EARNWQSPROTECTIONIOurnew PROPERTY -St. James Plantation ment, enormous kitchen, 3,000 Sq, 
earnings plan ensures your family offers the beet In coastal living for Ft, $185,000, 703-289-6146. 
wH racaiva a alaady, weekly in- second homa or retirement. Oul- 

eome as long a* your available lor standing amenities include prhrata Quality and Value Beyond Com- 
woril. TRISM SPECIALIZED CAR- ooaanfrontbeachclub, Intracoastai pare. Homes Irom $44,000. No 
RiERS. 1-80O-S68-I8S1. Walemiay Park, Dye Championship money down to qualified land own- 

• golf, swimming and tennis. Golf A ers. Over 10,000 satisfied 

Driver Mama can EARN UP TO water homesites, custom homes, homeowners. Freebuildarconparl- 
44,i( PER MILE. Our high volume townhomes i patk) homes avail- son Information and Cotor Brochure, 
of oomtnercial and govomment able. Properties including Club Write or Call PatwII Homes. Box 
IrdgMenablsaquallfladdrivariaams membership Irom $35,000, Request 1 358, Mk)lothlan,VA231 13 1-800- 
leavnth* boat wages, MINIMUM our -Discovery Packet' by calling 647-8398, 
MILEAGE GUARANTEE AND 1-800-245-3871. 

MUCH MOREI You-NbepaM routed DECK TOP BOATHOUSE w/holst 

mllM lor doaignatad commodities NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, S,S, - on 1/2 acre. Fully rip-rapped shore 
anddrivoonly late-model, satellite- LuxuryCondos4Homes. Oceanfront/ line Ready lor your boat on Smith 
equipped conventlonais lor Oceanvlew. Special amenliles with Mm. $69,900. Walker Devekipmeni 
'America's oUeat and largest muni- ail accomodattons. Summer Spe- 1 -800-377-0470. Owner/ Agent, 
ttone hauler. One year OTR and dais from $75/Day. Free Brochure, 



USEALITTIE 
RESTRAIKTWITH 



YOUR KIDS. 




Sometimes yT)u just gotta put kids in their place. 

And when you're on the road, that place is buckled in their 

own safety belts, and firmly Do mis, and your kids will 

be mone than ready for the long road ahead of them. 

YDUaijUliAiSIAIMRIONADUMm 
n,^_.. HICKLEyDURSARIYBBI .._^ 



mmmmmmm 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmm 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Call Sharon today to place 
your ad in the dasdifleds. 

547-4571 




Sharon 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

1 time 

2 times 
4 times 



20 Wonis 
or leu 

$ 7.50 
$ 13.50 
$ 22.50 



Additionai 
words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your personal Classified Ad four times for only $22.50. You 
can cancel your ad at any time. 

All Classified Ads run In three newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmoutti Times). No additional charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 
























-. 








' 








20 words 



Run my personal ad for . 
Payment is enclosed $ . 



issues. 



Make check payable to Byarly Publications 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Cliesapealte, Va. 23327 

Name • 

Address ^___ 

City 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 



PERSONAL ADS mil b« placw) by pri- 
VIM Individuili. Comrrardtl and butl- 
ntu ralilad adi do not quality lor 2-tlmt 
and 4-tlms panonal ralH. 



COMBINATION RATE : Run thli lama panonal ad In any 
01 h« Byarly Publlcallona natmpaptf lor an addll tonal S3 
on* lima, $6 mo ilmM, 17 lour llmaa. Nampapara In 
Franklin, Emporia. Lawranoavllla, DInwIddIa and Patan- 
t)urg. Can S47-4571 lor dataili. | 




BUILDING/REMODELING 



LAWN MAINTENANCE 



CHELSEA CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Custom finished carpentry, Interior 
trim, decks, fences, cabinets, entar- 
i tainmem centers. 427-9169 Gregg. 



G & T LAWN MAINTENANCE 

The ultimate in lawn care. Licensed 
& insured. 471-9616. 



CARPET SERVICE 



MOVING & HAULINQ - ' 



CARPET CLEANING 

No gimmicks. $17,50 per room Spot 

treatmeni'dooclorizor includca 
H iHiva/s, clost'ls, baihs, 1/2 pnce 

853-7994 

ProfGssional Steam Cleaning Scrvice 



BOYD MOVma COMPANY 

Short notice, pick-up, delivery 
sen^ice. We accept appliances, fur- 
niture and tools toward the cost of 
move. Call David at B55-2792. 

CHESSON TRANSFER 
Home & office movingi Insured. 
Reasonable rates, 545-1793. 



CLEANING 



PAINTING & DECORATING 



MOM'S CLEANING 

Houses, empty houses, office 
cleaning & apartments. Reasonable 
rates. Weekly, bi-weekly & monthly. 
Call 464-2639. Leave msg. 

MAKE YOUR HOUSE SPARKLE 

Kelly's Cleaning Service. Located 
near ODU. 489-2746. 

HUSBANDS ONLYII 
If mom's happy, everyone's happy, 
right? Treat her to a sparkling clean 
home. Reasonable, rates, 
dependable, references. Call 483- 
3534. 

ALMOST NEW, PROFESSIONAL 
PRESSURE WASHING 

Flemove mikJew, dirt & unwanted 
stains. Free estimates. 547-9175. 



COLOR PRIDE PAINTING CO. 

421-7007 

Before you make that final decision, 

let our customers speak to you by 

our reference list. Free estimates. 

Ray's Pahiting 
FfM EstbnatM 

Quality work, interior, exterior, 
resklential & commercial. Call day or 
night 588-6431. 



PLASTERING 



GENERAL REPAIRS 



WIDNER PLASTER 
OR DRYWALL 

Do you want a good, clean, guaran- 
teed job? We can do it. Circle 
ceilings, sprayed ceilings & repair 
anything. 487-8690, Richard. 



F & D SMALL & LARGE JOBS 

Drywalls, finishing, painting, mason- 
ry repairs, roofs. Specialize in 
decks. Remodeling of all types. Call 
464-2639. Ask for Dale. Leave msg 
on machine. 



PLUMBING 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



KITTS FLOOR SERVICE 

Oak ftoors installed, sanding & 
finishing. All types of homo 
improvements. 55 years exp. 488- 
6985. 

THE HOME CENTER-the 
cheapeast guy in town. Siding, 
roofing, painting. 393-6324, 488- 
0969. 



24 HOUR PLUMBING SERVICE. 
SERVING ALL PARTS OF VA. 
BEACH. 7 DAYS A WEEK. Water 
heaters replaced. Leaks repaired. 
Gas lines and drain cleaning. 
Remodeling and new house 
plumbing. Many years of 
experience. Jim Maybee, state 
registered Master Plumber. 340- 
0492 anytimel (Va. Beach only) 



TREE SERVICE 



ACTION TREE SERVICE 

Since 1965. Complete service. 
Lk:ensed, insured. Free estimates. 
Firewood. Tim Taylor. 399-6S8&. 



Call Sharon today at 

547-4571 

to place your 

classified ad. 

Deadline: 5 p.m. Monday 



ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES 



HELP WANTED 



10,000 so. Ft. FURNITURE- 
GUSS-CLOQKS-DOLLS-MUCH 
MUCH MORE. OPEN 7 DAYS, 10- 
5. 1804 GRANBY ST. 622-0905. 



T 

BUS. OPPORTUNITIES 



SERVPRO Cleaning^A Restoratton 
Franchise. 34 K Completel Join the 
best loam. Call 800-826-9586. 

$1S>,000^ i^QE 

Executive needed t^ administer es- 
tablished marketing program. In- 
vestment of $32,0ob is required. 
Everything is provWed. This is not a 
franchise. For a confidential inter- 
view call "11 
800-248^1224 

$150,000+ Range 

Executive needed to/ administer es- 
tablished marketing program. In- 
vestment of $32,000 is required. 
Everything is provided. This is not a 
franchise. For a q^idential inter- 
view call 

800-245-«24 

PRINT SHOP-For sain. Established 
16 years. Heart of l^folk financial 
distrh:!. Call 622-73$3. Principles 
only. 

ASSOCIATE WAN'KD: Unusual 
maintenance oo. serving customers 
In densely populated area of NJ 
wishes to open office in rural VA. 
Grossing $500,000+.. |^i repeat, very 
profitable. Ownership oppt'y 
available. $14,500. feq'd. Baron, 
201-736-8523. ' 



BUS. PROP/SALE 



COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS in 
downtown Portsmouth and 
Churchland. Call 399'€390, 484- 
1275 or 399-3298. Owner/Agent. 



CHILD CARE 



CHILD CARE/NANIES-Famlly 
homes. Exp'd. Own car. Salary 
$5.00 to $6.00/hr. NO FEE. Call 
467-1644. . 

KEMPSVILLE-Responsible mom. 
USDA. Non-smoker. Full-time, $60 
week. Part-time, hourly. 474-2485. 

WORKING PARENT 
Academk: programs ft^ll ages 2 1/ 
2 to school age. Ciriculum-Primary 
through school ages uses ABEKA. 
The hours are: 6 a.m. r 6 p.m. 545- 
8163.- 

CHESAPEAKE 
BABYSIT-NON-SMO^MG CHRIS- 
TIAN HOME. Fullyipai^-^me. Drop- 
ins wekxjme. Fenced 'in yard with 
swingset. Snacks provided. 
Reasonable rates. 545-3800. 

CHILD CARE-KNELl'S RIDGE. 
Planned activities, meals, 
reasonable rates. 5 years ex- 
perience wfth refereflces. Flexible 
hours. 436-6664. JH' 

CHILD CARE IN MY HOME 
anytime. Negotiable 'rates, military 
wife. 5 years expit#ience, two 
children of my own. Birdneck 
kx;atk»i. Call Sherri 422-4416. 

.: . : 'O-": ■ 



CLOTHING 



WEDDING GOWf?-White, full- 
length, short sleeyes, satin w/ 
beaded sequins. $300 or best offer. 
Call 471-3610. 



HELP WANTED 



MARKETING/OPINION 
R^EARCH firm seeks paitk;ipants 
for short discussion groups to share 
likes and dislikes about various 
products and services. Such 
research helps business and 
government leadens respond to the 
public's needs. If Interested, Call 
Han-let. iNFOCUS Group Sen/k:es, 
490-1351. 



AUTO SALES PEOPLE 
THERE IS ANOTHER UFE! 

You can have more freedom, much 
higher commission & real growth 
opportunity. All this & more selling a 
product that is easier to sell at less 
than 1/2 the price of a car. I know, I 
sold cars too. Call Bob Foreman 
490-2422. 

SALES REPRESENTATIVE 

An authorized AT&T security sys- 
tems dealer, k>caled in Hampton, 
seeks professional, ambitious, 
career-minded individuals Im- 
mediately to work southside 
territory. Opportunity to advance into 
management and grow with young 
firm. Contact Ray Bakw 625-0371 . 

AIRLINE CREW 
TO $10 HOUR 

Will train. 461 -1 148. Jobs Plus. Job 
listing service. Only $40 fee. 

SALES REP 

National co. seeks sales REP to 
call on accounts in your area. $40 K 
to $80 K First year Comm. Potential. 
4(»-728-9998. 

TELEPHONE SALES 

Working from our Chesapeake 
office, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Mon.-Fri. 
Excellent opportunity for housewife 
or senior citizen. Call 547-4571. 

PART-tlME-Exp. in phone sales 
helpful. Work at home. Great in- 
come opportunity. Up to $50 per 
hour possible. 428-5720. 

PART-TIME-Sell Petra Lingerie with 
home party plan. All lingerie under 
$35. Free kit, excellent income. Car 
req'd. 1-800-484-1031. Code 9802. 

HOME WORKERS NEEDED at 
once. Full/^art-timsi. No experience/ 
capital needed. Applicatbns njshed. 
Send stamped envelope ■ Mllhoun, 
9627 1st Bay St.. SuKe C, D^. K, 
Norfolk. VA 2361 8. 

GREAT BRIDGE: PROFESSK>NAL 
couple seeks loving, dependable 
fenMle to care for one-year-old chlkj 
in our home. 25-30 hours/wk. 
guaranteed. (Days, no weekends). 
Should be non-smoker and have 
own transportation. CPR certifk;a- 
tion desirable. Pay commensurate 
with experience. References 
required. Mrs. Bondy • 482-6941. 

MAKE MONEY FROM HOME 

Telephona calling for charitable 
joian^5^on»|>mwl|i(f!'5MfJ pay. 
'CaS ^6-e2el,*1gir«. ■'<;ffrt. only. 

PRACTICE MANAGER 

Established Portsmouth Surgk»l 
Practee seeking experienced medi- 
cal & practKM manager to handle ft 
supervise overall operattons of the 
practice. Responsibilities will 
include; Supen/ision & coordination 
of all office personnel functions, in- 
cluding expertise in financial 
reporting, insurance computer & in- 
terfacing with outsMe contractors, 
requires excellent organiztfkin and 
communicatbn skills ft 3 to 5 years 
previous medical management 
experience. Salary commensurate 
with experience. Send resume In- 
cluding salary history to: PRACTICE 
MANAGER, cA> The Chesape^e 
Post, P.O. Box 1327, Chesapeake, 
VA 23327. 

KUWAIT/SAUDI JOBS: Skilled ft 
unskilled mean & women needed. 
$35 -f per hour. Pakf Transp. Info. 
504-646-1800 DEPT. KS1081. 

PHOTO TRIMMERS 

EARN TO $125 PER DAY. NO 

EXPERIENCE NEEDED 

1-800-262-4389 

CRUISE SHIP JOBS 

Hiring-$2,000+/mo. Summer/year 
round. Bartenders/casino workers/ 
gift shop sales/tour guides/etc. Free 
travel. Hawaii, Caribbean, 
Bahamas, Europe. No exp. 
necessary. 1-206-736-7000 ext. 
9368N6. 



HOMES FOR SALE 



T 



Ta places your ad in 

the classifieds, call 

Sharon today! 

547-^71 



■?♦- 



CONSTRUCTION 

NEEDED 

IMMEDIATELY 

^All skills up to 

$70,000. Tax free, 

paid expenses. 

1-800-435-9744 



PUNGO-3 yr. old house on U 
acres, pool + many extrasi 
$138,900.721-7865. 

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, VA-3 
bedroom ranch, 1 1/2 bath, 
enck)sed porch, full cellar, central 
air. washer & drysr, 2 1/2 acres, 
workshop, 2 car garage, 2 out- 
buiMings, above ground swimming 
pool, small orchard ft garden. TaxM 
about $300. $98,500. 804-736- 
8012. 

FAIRFIELD-Condo. $64,500. Great 
buy. 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 
firntece. Call 496-1104 weakdayt. 

49fe772 weekends. 

M you have Mmething you want to 
sell, let the dassHieds do K fw you. 
Call 547-4571 today. 



Best Fare 



NORF<XK 
TO 

Round Trip TOKYO 

JAPAN TRAVEL SERVICE, INa 

1-800-822-3336 



I.IVE PSYCHIC COUNSiUNQ 

Tarot ridings • Astrology * Look Into Your Futurt 

1-900-454-1444 $1.79 per mlnuta 

1-800-^5-5580 InfoJC.C. 
WharhMlnc. Lakemod,CO I8-¥ 



HOMES FOR SALE 



INVEST IN YOUR FUTURE NOWl 
FHA/HUD/VA government homes 
■II areas. Low down. Great interest 
rates. Special incentives. Call Al 
Neely, ^Mcialist. 456-9500. Realty 
Executives. 



INSTRUCTION 



BARTENDINQ 

A NEW CAREER 

Intemattonal bartending Institute 

Call 497-6700 lor more info. 



LIVESTOCK 



HORSE-2 yr. old Palomit\o paint 
stud. Started under saddle, very 
gentle. $600 negotiable. 482-8280. 



MISC. FOR SALE 



HAPPY JACK FLEA GARD; All met- 
al patented device controls fleas in 
the home without PESTICIDES or 
EXTERMINATORS. Results 
overnight. INDUSTRIAL HDWE & 
SPLY 543-2232. 

KILLS FLEAS! 

Buy ENFORCER Flea Killers for 
pets, home & yard. Guaranteed 
effectivel Buy ENFORCE at Rob- 
bies Home Center, 3410 High St., 
Portsmouth, VA. 

BRITISH ISLES RECIPES-Comish 
Pasties, Devonshire Splits. 1 8 more, 
send ^.50 to Susan Pratt, P.O. box 
15356, Chesapeake, VA 23328- 
5356. 



MOBILE HOMES 



FLEETWOOD-'87 14 x 70. Have 
10% down to refinanca? 3 bedroom, 
2 bath, like new, many extras. WUI 
negotiate moving home. $12,500. 
CaH 934-8474. 



MUSICAL 



PIANO-Baby Grand. 'Chk^^ering,' 
refinished, nice ivory keys, excellent 
tone. Delivered. $1,895. Call 744- 
4761. 



PERSONALS 



ASTROLOGICAL/NUMERICAL 
ANALYSIS. Your horoscope caksu- 
lated by a professonal astrologer. 
Call 498-2471 orwrite to James. 
P.O. Box 1101, Virginia Beach, VA 
2341. 

ADOPTION 
We can give your baby a loving 
home, and can helpl Let's discuss 
"tDpen, Caring Adoptnn* . . . Tom/ 
Loffaine (301 ) 897-9528 Collect. 

PEN FRIENDS IN VIRGINIA 
& ACROSS THE NATION 
For friendship & possibly more, 
send $1 & a self-addresses, 
stamped envetope for more infor- 
matbn & application to Club One, 
9555 River Road, Petersburg. VA 
23803. 

YOUNG "31- HAPPILY MARRIED 
couple, unable to have a baby 
desires to share their tow with a 
white infant. Will provide warmth & 
seojrity in a beautiful home. Can 
help with legal and medical 
expenses. Please call collect even- 
ings or weekends at (703) 444- 
4943. 

ADOPTION-YOUNG CHILDLESS 
COUPLE wishes to give a baby a 
happy and secure future. Lots of 
love from a full-time mom and 
devoted dad. Legal/medk»l paM. 
Call collect Cheryl and Chris 703- 
817-9884. 

ADOPTION 
Loving co(4>le wishes to adopt batiy. 
Legal and medkal expenses pak). 
Please can Ginny and BIN collect at 
703-241-8166. 



IHSTUrTCASH paid for anUquei. 
AU ktnds. vntt come to you. 



VENDING/LOCAL 

$2 - $5,000 per month 

possible. Buy now and 

grow rich. 

1-800-723-7800 



SljHutments & TmimAmtses 

7itntss CtnUr. 

^tar nmndSpa &S(uma, 

Tmm Courts 

& Tuttmg Qrun 

Open 'Daify 9-6; 3m 11-6 

(X«ProvtdnoeRaed2Mi. 



W.ofMiUtvyH^way 

424-7867, 



ifli 



PERSONALS 



A LOVING CHILDLESS COUPLE 
wishes to give your baby a happy, 
opportunity-filled future. Can pay 
legal and medical expenses. Please 
call Molly and Peter collect. (703) 
256^492. 

ADOPTION-Happy, dependable 
couple, bves chlMren and wants to 
a<topt a caucaskin baby. We are a 
family doctor and spouse, capable 
of provkling a secure, toving home. 
Willing to pay legal & medical 
expenses. Call Harriet ft David toll- 
free at home 1-800-484-7622 
•Security Code 4428.'' 

ADOPTION-WANTED A BABY-A 
dream come true for us. Warm, 
fuzzy, childless couple longs to 
share loving home with the child 
they can't have themselves. Can 
help with l«gal/medk:al expenses. 
Please, let's tdk. Call collect. Len & 
Susan (703) 768-HUGS. 



PETS 



AQUARIUM SET UPS-2 complete. 
55 gaL $200; 30 gal. $90. Diatom 
filter, needs few small parts $30. 
340-1301. 

AKn"A PUPPIES 
Gorgeous cotoring & show quality. 
1st shots, vet checked. Starting at 
$750. Must see to appreciate. If no 
answer, please leave message, 
473-8364. 

COCK-A-TOO - White 2 1/2 yr. oW 
male. Caga/perch. Needs lots of 
attentton. Call 1-874-7540. 

WOLF HYBRID CUBS-8 weeks, 
black, female, hi %. Not of local 
breeding. Other $425 up. Suffolk. 1- 
986-3529. 



REAL ESTATE 



CHOWAN RIVER-NC. Restaurant 
with oyster bar, (2,880 sq. ft.), 2 
story, 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath 
resklential, 1.800 sq. ft. A 13 slip 
boat house, 30 space campground, 
beach & gas pier situated on 7 1/2 
acres. $420,000. 919-358-3901. 

FOR $48,500 YOU CAN OWN A 2 
BR, 1 BA in Freen Run w/brand new 
carpet. 3 patns and all appliances. 
471-7704. 

RESTAURANT-Seats 35, eleah, 
equipped. In operation. Reasonable 
offers. Contact Jo 545-3915, 7 a.m. 
to 2 p.m., Mon. through Fri. 



RENTALS 



SUFFOLK-COLLEGE PARK. 1/2 
duplex. 1 1/2 bath, 2 bedroom, 
dining room, living room, private 
driveway. $445 per month. 490- 
7027. 

VILLA HEIGHTS-Newly remodeled, 
new carpet, appliances, painted in- 
side & out. Two bedroom, 1 bath, 
water & sawage included. $375 & 
security. 466-1706. 



YARD SALES 



HICKORY RURITAN CLUB-2752 
Battlefield Blvd. South. Community 
yard sale to benefit Michelle 
Abrames. July 25th, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



USED & REBUILT 
PIANOS 



Area Tidewater Dealer 

Must Liquidate $50,000 

Worth Of inventory By 

Aug.25, 1992. Some 

New - Some Used - 

Floor Model - Bankmpt 

Stock. Merchandise Can 

Be Seen Locally. 

Call Credit Manager For 

More Information. 

1-800-346-1355 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



MAKE 
MONEY 



$ 
$ 
$ 

$ 
$ 

$ 
• 



FAST! 

This exciting oppor- 
^ tunity may be Ju^ for ^ 
$ you. $ 

^ Your organization f 
g can ram extra money $ 
fast and easy soliciting g 
subscriptions to your § 
g local community news- g 
$ paper. $ 

g For more informa- g 
g ti<Hi, can S47-4571 and g 
g ask to speak to»miewie g 
g about CAMPAIGN SO. g 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



■^^^^^w^^p^p^l^i^^il 



mmm. 



mmmmmmmmmimmmmm 



10 Virginia Beach Sun. Wedn^day, July 22. 1992 



NEA was an 
assembly to 
remember 

Contlnuad From Pag* 3 

and his mind is being shaped. His 
name is not KHiMxrow. It is today.' 
Ladies and gentteman, it is today we 
must fnake children a {mority. 

"And so in this election year of 
1992, in this 100th year of (he Fledge 
of Allegiance, I want to read to you a 
new Pledge to Children. W(»ildn't it 
be wonderful if this nation and its 
politioi] leaders made a vow to chii- 
(ben,ralherthanji]Sti»omises? Ii^ 
all of us - especially our political 
leaders - to make this pledge. 

"Fledge to Children: I pledge al- 
legiance to theChilcben of the United 
Stat^ of America and to their future, 
for which I stand, and resolve that 
this nation, caring and just, shall reach 
the potential in every child, with firee- 
dom and opportunity for all. 

"Fellow delegates, this is our 
pledge to children. And, we must 
make it America's pledge." 



The Democrats* 
juking, jiving 
is over for now 

□ Contlnuad Rom Pagt 2 

cent citizens. AIDS will spread, and 
nothing will be done to control it 
Congress will continue to be the same 
self-serving arrogant body diat it has 
always been. Condoms will continue 
to be given out at schools to little 
children, while i^ayer is forbidden. It 
will soon beacriflMtomaition God's 
name in public, and you could be 
arrested for it Can a country survive 
under those conditions? Not likely. 
Welcome to die real world. 



CBDA to host 
U.S.'s Laura Ward 

The Central Business District 
Association, and Hunton and 
Williams, will present Laura A. 
Ward, assistant U.S. attorney for 
the Eastern District of New Ywk, 
on Thursday, August 6 at the Holi- 
day Inn Executive Center on 
Greenwich Road. The i»ogram be- 
gins at 11:30 a.m. 

Cost is $15 for CBDA members; 
and $17.50 for noirniembers. 
, Reservations and fayment must 
be made by Monday, August 3. 

For further information call 490- 
78120. 



Kempsville AARP 
to hold its meeting 

The American Association of 
Retired Fersons (AARF), 
Kempsville Chapter #4212, will 
hold its monthly meeting on 
Wednesday, August 12, from 10 
a.m. to noon at the Kempsville 
Community and Recreation Center, 
800 Monmonth Drive. 

The program will be a presenta- 
tion of AARFs draft propcml for 
health care reform called, "Health 
Care America." Gordon Morton. 
AARF state directCff for Virginia, 
will make the presentation. 

The public is invited. 



Secretaries will 
hold dinner meeting 

The Tidewater Chapter, Frofes- 
sional Secreiaies Intonational, will 
hold its monthly dinner mating on 
Tuesday, July 28 at the Holiday Inn 
Executive Center on Greenwich 
Road tt Newtown Road. 

Networking begins at 5:30 and 
dinner at 6 p.m. Cost is $11.50. 
There will be a prc^ram on com- 
puter. 

Contact CharlMte Scott at 628- 
7023 for relations. 



PWP announce 
b^chf^t dances 

Parents WitlwM tan^ of Vir- 
gittia Beach, Qavm 21^ will hoU 
BetK;hfest celelndn dances on 
Friihy. July 31 i^ StOvday. Au- 
gmt 1 at the Dva Nedc OfTic^s 
Club. 
CMi bw only. Coat to $Vk 
R» more infoiMttiM aU 498- 
■2666. 






STOREWIDE 
SAVINGS!! 

TVS, STEftEOS, VCRS, CAMCORDERS, 
MICROWAVES, SMALL APPLIANCES, 
PHONES, CLOTHING FOR THE ENTIRE 
FAMILY, HOUSEWARES, DOMESTICS, 
HOME FURNISHINGS, WATCHES & 
JEWELRY, TOYS, SPORTING GOODS, 
HARDWARE, GARDEN & PATIO 
SUPPLIES, AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES 
& LOTS MORE! 



BRAND NAME 
MERCHANDISE!! 

MAGNAVOX, GE, SAMSUNG,RCA, 
GOLDSTAR, EMERSON, JENSEN, 
WEST BEND, MR. COFFEE, BLACK & 
DECKER, HANES, LEE, SOUTHERN 
CLASSICS, DUNDEE, 
RUBBERMAID, NINTENDO, GAME 
BOY. MURRAY & SUNBEAM TO 
NAMEJUSTAFEWI 
MANUFACTURER'S WARRANTIES , 
VALID ON ALL APPLICABLE ITEMS! 



EVERY PRICE 
CUT 30% 

Ewary Nmii In Mode wNI Iw itecoimM 30% 
atth«i«(|^tM«,*MnthoM«lraMiy marked down! 
QinnlMiM hnltBd to atock on hand. 
No ratuma, axchwigM, rainchacks, mfr. coiqxma, , 
Sr. CWzan iNacounta or FkMM Sato Prtca 
Guarantaa. Sorry, no paraonal checka. 

ALL SALES FINAL! 

Tha Shoa tJepartment is NOT going out of 
buslnaaa iHit IS partlclpaUng in ttils sala. 



SHOP REGULAR STORE HOURS... HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION! 



ONLY AT THESE SELECTED STORES 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

Arrowhead Plaza Shopping Center 
5612 Princes Anne Road 



mSHM 

\ 



f:::^^ 




onlyl 



IT'S BUSINESS-AS-USUAL AT OTHER ROSES DISCOUNT STORES 



SALE CONDUCTED BY NASSI-BERNSTEIN COMPANY INC. AS AGENT 



What's biting 


^^^v 


Historic 


B 


at the beach ^^ 


ftffi^^Li 


marlcer 


^1 


See oafie 5 ^ ^ ^^g^ . ^ 


"^ClJHh^ 


See 


H 



l\/lilitary 
News 

See page 6 



Vlrgini 



each Sun 



. ^^^^ ^fet^^i^A'^^ !__ 

"The newspaper's not going to run the city" 

"It's almost a sham," said Councilman Bob Clyburn, who doesn't take fcrcm things, as can surveys, when i „,« «^ -rut^m/oo. ^ «v.«,^ ™ 

... , . „., ^, ... , r\xL. •! I- J.X I ccalainquesuons are phrased to ehcit WIlAT TtlE I RJD SAYIilG 

Virginian-Pilots articles seriously; Other council members attack cemin answers. 

o.'i..4r.. ^u^^i.» .M.M D^i:^.» /^u:^< r^u^^i.^A iA/»ii. r^u.. ».»»»M.»,. »..»»M^:w» 'Tm disappointed in the way the .„.._,_........,_,, . ^_. . .. 



By MJ. RICHARDS 

Vii^inia Beach Sun Staff Wrilsr 

Nearly one month after The Vir- 
ginia Beach Beacon, a tabloid insert 
to The Virginian-Pilot and The Led- 
ger-Star, called for the resignation of 
Virginia Beach Police Chief Charles 
Wall, Virginia Bea;h City Council 
members and City Manager James 
Spore are still 
undecided on 
his future. 

Some council 
members say 
that a negative 
presentation of 
surveys con- 
ducted by the 
Virginia Beach 
Policeman's 
Benevolence Association and the 
Virginia Beach Sergeant's Associa- 
tion that were published in the Pilot 
should not be taken seriously. 

Several newspaper articles have 
continuously stated that many of 
Wall's officers are unhappy about 
morale, promotions and assignments, 
and that the results of the surveys 




Wall 



suggest Wall is not doing his job 
effectively. Otho' articles question 
the decline in the number of tickets 
issued and arrests made. 

Many Virginia Beach City Coun- 
cil memb^s say that Spore is in chaige 
of all personnel matters, and they will 
not interfere unless he requests ac- 
tion from City Council. 

"I think the chief is trying to ad- 
dress the problems in an open and 
positive way, and I applaud him for 
that," said Spore. "I think if these 
individuals who exposed these con- 
cerns are willing to try and address 
the situations they're concerned 
about, 1 think the chief is more than 
desirous of working on the solutions. 
I think that's positive." 

Spore said that he has asked Wall 
to {»epare a report comparing survey 
results from last year and this year, 
and that conclusions drawn from the 
surveys and from analysis of the de- 
cline in summons and arrests will be 
presented to City Council this week. 

Many Virginia Beach City Coun- 
cil members said that they will re- 
serve judgement on Wall until Spore 
addresses the problems, but com- 



Norfolk Police Chief 
says Wall's respected 

Seven-year chief 
says Wall should 
stick to his guns 




Henson 



By M.J. RICHARDS 
Virginia Beach Sun Staff Writer 

Norfolk Police Chief Henry P. 
Henson has been following recent 
newspaper coverage of Virginia 
Beach Police Chief Charles Wall, 
particularly the reported "problems" 
of low morale in his department 

Therepoited 
problems have 
led to Mayor 
MeyeraObon- 
dorf calling for 
an investiga- 
tion, which is 
now being 
looked into by 
City Manager 
James Spore. 

Henson, who 
has been chief 
for seven years and has 687 sworn 
officers in his department, said that 
his expoience as a police chief has 
been multifaceted, which presents a 
challenge. 

"Trying to do so many things, you 
need to be in a numbo* of different 
places at the same time, it seems," 
said Henson. "There's a lot of office 
work that needs to be kept up and yet 
you have to be out at meetings with 
the citi/^ns and with your people." 
Henson said that because police 
operations arc 24-hours and many 
things happen at once, it is very diffi- 
cult to be in so many different places 
at the same time. 

When Henson lodes at "nmrale" in 
his own dei^rtment, he said it a diffi- 
cult concept to pinpoint. 

"When you say 'morale,' it's very 
subjective," said Henwn. "It de- 
pends on who's talking and what 
tlKy have in mind and it could mean 
anything." 

Henson said that when ttere is an 
alleged "morale problem" within a 
department, the specific |voblem and 
issues need to be addre^ed in (a6a 
to come up with a specific solutim, 
but the word "morale" is too vague to 
describe any problon, if it is to be 
corrected. 

Henson said (hat when problems 
arise, pec^le are often caught in tte 
middte, and they can only (k) what 
they think is right 

"TTie police chief is, just as all the 
officers are, they remain in the 
middle," said Henstm. Tha goes 
for Chief Wall w smy rttar police 

OffiCCTS." 

HensM) sakl there are diffoent 
ways to solve pn4)lems, aid used a 



typical service call as an example. 

"If the person did OQt get anestcd, 
the person violating the law may be 
pleased, but the victim may not be," 
he said. "If the p^son did get ar- 
rested, die victimof the crime may be 
pleased, but the person violating the 
law may not be." 

Henson said either situation puts 
the officer in the middle. 

"When you say 'mo- 
rale,' it's very subjec- 
tive. It depends on 
who's talking and 
what they have in 
mind. 

Norfolk Police Chi^ , 
Henry P. Benton 

"If you don'ttake action, you're in 
the middle, and if you do take action, 
you're still in the middle," said 
Henson. "The only way you deal 
with these things is to do what you 
think is right" 

Henson said that in the same yray. 
Wall needs to solve the probllsms in 
his department by identifying them 
and doing his best 

"I think he's pretty well reqjectwl," 
said Henson of Wall, who meets 
monthly with Henson and other area 
polia chiefs. 

What would Henson suggest Wall 
do to combat critici$hv by poli(X of- 
fkers and the media? 

"Continue doing whkt you think is 
right," said H»ison. "\^ich is whsit 
most people would do^" 

Children's rights 
council to gather 

ByJOHNAVAUGHAN.JR. 
Special to Ihe Virginia Baach Siin ' 

Attention fathers, mothers, 
grandparents, guardians, profes- 
sionals and otfter individuals 'who 
advocate change ui the "systrni" to 
betio^ handle the issues of c)kild 
custody, access (visiution). 
finncid and emoiMaal chiM.nip- 
{XMt, and other pMlttomriShi^g 
diiidren of dKvoroe anl sqwMkn. 

This advocacy ooafition and «q>- 
poit poup me^ on the fim^uM 
thsd MrauJays <d each month, with 
tlw next niMtlng scheduled fn' 
Monday. Augua 3 at 7 p.m. in 
meeting room 1 1 at Thalia Lynn 
Baptist Church. 4392 Virginia 
Beach Baulevad. 

For fiBihtf infonnaiMn call CRC 
hotline. 463-ICIDS (5437); Michaei 
Ewing. 543-5993: Jdm Vaughm, 
498-1823; or Rwd Fowler. 874- 
9556. 



mented on individual issues. 

Councilman Paul Lanteigne. a po- 
lice office, said that nationwide, 
morale is a problem for all law en- 
forcement agencies. 

"In our situation, I think the mo- 
rale problem is plagued by the Nor- 
folk newspaper constantly writing 
incorrect and negative news stories, 
which compound die iHoblem." said 
Lanteigne. 

"We're all concerned about mo- 
raleproblems," said Councihnan John 
Baum. "It's not the chiefs fault 
Widi the problems in Virginia Beach 
in the economy, everybody's getting 
edgy and has morale problems." 

Councilman Bob Clybura said that 
he does not take the Pilot's articles 
about low morale and discontentment 
in die Virginia Beach Police Depart- 
mentseriously , and questions the fair- 
ness of the articles. 

"There's no doubt in my mind diat 
die surveys and polls have been slaned 
boUi by die Norfolk newsi»pas and 
the Benevolence Association," said 
Clybum. "It's almost a sham." 

Clyburn also said that statistics 
can be arranged to portray many dif- 



ferent things, as can surveys, when 
cetlzm questions are phrased to elicit 
certain answers. 

I'm disappointed in Uie way die 
Benevolence Association's or police 
associations have done this," said 
Clybum. "I don't think they're being 
fair to Chief Wall or ihe police de- 
partment they are supposed to be 
serving. I don't think they're doing a 
service to die Beach at all, die way 
it's been handled." 

Since the results of die surveys 
were published by die Pilot, how- 
ever, council members said diey have 
not received any phone calls firom 
citizens about die surveys or Wall. 

"Not a one," said Councilman John 
Moss. He said that if people had a 
problem, he is sure they would call, 
but he has talked to a few people in 
passing. 

"I diink people are very proud of 
die Virginia Beach Police Depart- 
ment" said Moss. "They do a won- 
derful job, and 1 hear firom people diat 
die Virginia Beach Police Dq)art- 
ment is doing a wonderful job." 

Lanteigne, Clybum, Baum. Vice 
Mayor William Sessoms and Coun- 
cilman Robert Dean also said they 
have not received any phone calls 
from citizens about Wall or the nega- 
tive publicity he has received, al- 
diough some have mentioned die is- 



"/ think the chief Is trying to address the problems in an 
open and positive way, and I af^laud him for that. " 
City Manager James Spore 

"/ think the morale problem is plagued by the Norfolk 
newspaper constantly writing incorrect and negative news 
stories.' 
Councilman Paul Lanteigne, a Virginia Beach 
police officer 

'If there was anything really wrong, I think I wouki have 
heard from people about it. I think the Norfolk newspaper has 
tost all of their credibility and I don't think the general publk: 
believes anything they read. " 
Councilman Robert Clybum 



sue in person. 

"Most of the conversations I've 
had with people about the police de- 
partment are very positive." said 
Lanteigne. "Most have been very 
complimentary." 

Sessoms said dial he thinks public 
support for Wall should not go unno- 
ticed, but it should not be what die 
city manager's decisions should be 
based on. Sessomssaid dial die /'(7(7<'5 
opinions on Wall, and its call for his 
resignation are clear, but he looks to 



Plans on hold 




Rockefeller's restaurant wants to expand. 



Marlin Club must wait for toxic soil test 
results before pursuing $300,000 project 



By M.J. RICHARDS 
Vfirgi'^ Baach Siin Staff Writer 

Preliminary investigations 
have uncovered some soil toxins, 
which may be harmless, at Rudee 
Lake's north sh(Me. 

The Virginia Beach Marlin 
Club, which plans to relocate six 
boat slips and make oUier im- 
provements to the 100-foot by 
50-foot parcel of land behind 
Rockafeller's Restaurant on 
Mediterranean Avenue, recendy 
conducted some preliminary soil 
Rsts as part of a permit process 
wiUi Uie Wetlands B(»rd. Plans 
for a 298-foot bulkhead seawall 
are inducted in the club's request 
. Although lead and chromium 
levels were found in the soil, an 
Environmental Protection 
Agency-approved company must . 
complete and evaluitte a soil test 
to determine whedicr the levels of 
lead and cliromium are in fact 
toxip. ., , 

"TTierc are levels of lead and 
chromium in your backyard. 
Natural levels," said Cason 
Barco, vice president of the Vir- 
ginia Beach Marlin Gub, which 
owns the land. 

The area was once used as a fill 
fcfr 3r«lging equipment by die 
Erosion Commission. 
' Barco sud th^ die qwstion is 
whedier die levels se ^e, and if 
the so-called contaminants are 
"leactat^," or can detoiorate to a 
toxic level diat is dangerous to 
humans, vegetation or marine 
life. 

"It was a preliminsy lest and 
the engineer representing us got 
excited about it bef(M% anyone 
analyzed (the samples,}" said 
Barco. He desoibed it as "just a 
scare." 

Ite has not yet det»miiwd die 



PROJECT PLAINS 



Tfie Virginia Beach Mar- 
lin Club, wfiich owns a par- 
cel of land by Rod<afeller's 
Restaurant on Mediterra- 
nean Avenue at Rudee In- 
let, is planning to make 
some improvements. 

The $300,000 project, 
which must be approved by 
the Virginia Beach Wet- 
lands Board, includes a 
298-foot bulkhead seawall, 
a 36-space parking lot and 
the relocation of six boat 
sl^s. 

A declston on the perrrM 
has been deferred to the 
August 17 meeting of the 
wetlands board, until soil 
testing is complete. 



cost of new soil tests, which will 
be completed some time before 
August 17. 

The tests, which are necessary 
to <*tain a permit from die Wet- 
lands Board to build a bulkhead, 
are routine. The WeUands Board 
deferred a decisim on the permit 
until its Monday, Aug. 17 meet- 
ing, so diat EPA-aRWoved tests 
caibeoNiduaed. 

Tte $300,000 projwt, which 
includes tndkhe^. lighting and 
boat slip changes also includes a 
plan to backfill less than two- 
tenths of an acre of land, and to 
pave a parking lot behind the 
re^urmit, creating 36 ct 37 new 
spaces. 

Barco said diat die additional 
poking spaces should make a 
difference in a (wking problem 
on nighu and weeteiKls. where 



customers must park blocks away 
or on neighboring streets and 
lawns. 

For now, Barco plans to "wait 
and see" what happens with the 
soil testing and permit applica- 
tion, before taking any other 
steps. 

"TTie facts are, diat diere arc no 
facts yet," said Barco. 

But Richard Scarper, Virginia 
Beach city planner and an advisor 
to die Virginia Beach Wetlands 
Board said his recommendations 
to die board lean toward not 
granting die permit 

Part of the WeUands Act a 
state policy, is "to preserve the 
weUands and to prevent their (te- 
spoliation and destruction and to 
accommodate necessary economic 
development in a manner consis- 
tent widi wetlands preservation." 

In Scarper's recommendation to 
the WeUands Board, he said the 
permit should be denied, but die 
preliminary soil tests were not 
die itfimary reason. 

"It is die opinion of die plan- 
ning department Uiat die project 
is contrary to this policy, inas- 
much as the project does not 
constitute necessary economic 
development and no attempts 
have bem ma^ to minimize fur- 
th^ degradation to wetland and 
subaqueous resounds in the Lake 
Rwlee area," said Scarper. 

He said that a parking lot has 
"no inherent requirement" for 
water access, and diat as ctevel- 
opmenl in die Rudee Inlet area 
expands, so will jmking needs. 

In his ro^ommcndation, how- 
eva. Sca-per did offer die advice 
of the planning department in 
finding other altermtives. 

Pleaae mc editorial, pafe 3 



Spore to make those decisions. 

"I'll tell you straight up." he said. 
"The newspaper's not going to ran 
die city of Virginia Beach; die city 
manager will. wiUi die help of City 
Council. I feel strongly about diat" 

Clybum said diat just because 
something is printed in die Pilot does 
not mean people believe it. 

"If there was anything rieally 
wrong. I think I would have heard 

D See NEWSPAPER'S, Page 5 

Great Bridge man 
took out warrant 
for Loxley's arrest 

Virginia B«ach Sun Staff Report 

Rich^d Tymtell is the man who 
took out a warrant for the arrest of 
Dr. Sidney S. Loxley, accusing die 
surgeon of contributing to the 
delinquency of a minor, said 
Chesapeake Deputy Common- 
wealth's Attorney Larry Willis, 
who is handling Tyndell's case. 

Loxley has two medic^ offices. 
One is in Virginia Beach on Inde- 
pendence Boulevard near Haygood. 
The other is in Chesapeake near 
Great Bridge. 

It is unclear what the relationship 
is, if any, between Tyndell and die 
minor or why die warrant was ob- 
tained. 

A woman answering the phone at 
Tyndell's address said, "We are not 
making any comments on this 
matter." The woman hung up be- 
fore she could be identified. 

Marvin Tyndell of Briarfield 
Drive in Great Bridge, who identi- 
fied himself as Richard Tyndell's 
fadier, said he does not krtow why 
Richard Tyndell filed die complaint 
against Loxley, who lives off Butts 
Station Road on Argyll Drive. 
Richard Tyndell could not be 
Kached for comment 

"1 don't know what diis is about, 
because 1 haven't spoken to my son 
in 14 or 15 years," Marvin Tyndell 
said. 

Marvin Tyndell said Richard 
Tyndell lives on Washington Drive 
in Great Bridge. He said he diinks 
Richard Tyndell has a daughter of 
high school age, but that Richard 
Tyndell's wife, Debra Tyndell and 
Richard have "avoided" him since 
diey married. He said he does not 
know what Richard Tyndell's occu- 
pation is. 

Loxley, who is married, was ar- 
rested on June 25, released on a 
perscxial recognizance bond and later 
asked to put up a $10,000 surely 
bond, which he paid, according w 
Willis. He is scheduled to appear in 
Chesapeake Juvenile Court on 
Tuesday, Aug. 4, Willis said, to 
answer die charge of coniribuiing to 
die delinquency of a minor. 

Loxley. about 55 years of age, 
could not be reached fOT comment 
on his arrest 

Acc<»ding to a Chesapeate mag- 
istrate, contributing to the delin- 
qiKncy of a minw could mean a 
variety of things, including having 
sex with someone under the age of 
18, or offering them illegal drugs w 
akohol. 

If convicted, Loxley faces a max- 
imum penalty of one year in jail 
and a $2300 fii», or both, but die 
penalty depends on the sevoity of 

Sm LOXLEVS. PigM^ - 



■MM 



2 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 29. 1992 






Editorials 



Get the facts straight 

In an article published on Tuesday, July 21 in The Virginian- 
Pilot and The Ledger-Star entitled "Toxic Waste found in soil 
along Lake Rudee shore," several facts were misrepresent^l, or 
just plain false. 

The article, as the headline implies, discusses "the surprise 
discovery of a toxic waste site," because levels of lead and 
chromium were found in the soil where the Virginia Beach 
Marlin Club's plans to fill in an area behind Rudee Inlet, pave a 
parking lot, relocate boat slips and build a seawall. 

For starters, lead and chromium, which can be found in the 
soil, can be natural soil components without being toxic. Ex- 
tremely high levels can be toxic when ingested, or absorbed 
through direct contact with the skin. 

Until testing done by an Environmental Protection Agency- 
approved firm is done, the true levels of alleged toxicity cannot 
be determined. 

In the story, the reporter states that -the Virginia Beach Marlin 
Club plans to build 19 boat slips. According to Cason Barco, 
the club's vice president, those figures arc incorrect. The club 
plans to relocate six slips. 

The article also reported plans to backfill 2.3 acres behind 
Rockafeller's Restaurant on Mediterranean Avenue. Barco said 
the area is less than two-tenths of an acre. 

Barco also explained that the area in question for the pro- 
posed parking lot is 100- by 50-feet, which could accommodate 
36 to 37 parking spaces. Barco said that any addition of park- 
ing spaces will help the congested parking area behind the 
restaurant, contrary to die Pilot's story. 

As long as facts afe misconstrued or blatantiy distorted, 
readers cannot be intelligently informed. It is a reporter's duty 
to be sure that correct information is given to his or her readers. 
Let's get the facts straight. — M.J.R. 



Sl€m 






NITU OUR DfLUXE 
SERVICE, ME NASH 
AND HKH YOUR CAR, 
VACUUM TUB INTERIOR, 
AND REMOVE ANY 

ROSS PEROT BUMPER 
STICKERS... 







High school class reunion shows both myself and 
my classmates have changed in only five years 



Community projects 

After a long, hard day at work, it's often nice to come home 
and relax. Sometimes people like to get out and expand their 
cultural horizons. 

Virginia Beach residents have many activities to choose fiwm, 
right in their backyard. Rather than staying home, there are 
many ways to get involved in the community. 

There are several concerts planned for the remaining summer 
nights and sunny afternoons. Grabbing a friend or family 
member and heading to the 24th Street stage at the Oceanfront, 
or a local church for entertainment can be both fun and inex- 
pensive. 

The local libraries and museums have several projects 
planned that include fun ways to spend your free time. 

Woman's clubs have some classes available tQ help hone 
artistic and aafty skills. 

Taking the time to get involved in some community activities 
is a great way to get to know yourself and fellow Virginia 
Beach residents a littie better while relaxing and learning new 
' things. — M.J.R. 

Foreign exchange 

In August, a group of international foreign exchange students 
will come to visit America as part of the Youth for Under- 
standing (YFU) exchange program. 

Teenagers from 27 countiies will come to visit, with hosting 
families to learn about our country's culture and teach a little bit 
about their own. 

Virginia Beach host families are still needed for some stu- 
dents fi"om other countiies. 

To sponsor a teenager call Donna Schnaars at 467-3919 or 
Judy Henderson at 1-800-872-0200. 

It could be a valuable learning experience for you, your fam- 
ily and your visitor. — M.J.R. 



HELLO". .'. HAi^TOi'iiiiiiiiiii! 




Hey, Bush! 

What's going on? 

We're in recession and our green's almost gonel 

Hey, Bush! 

Where's the Plan? 

You Better be careful or you woni be the man! 

Hey, Bush! 

Where's our cash? 

People are sleeping around the trash! 

Hey. Bush! 



Nesius 



Where are you? 

Stop this fall and help get us through! 

Hey, Bush! 

Do it now! » 

Time's running out, so help us somehow! 

Hey. Bush! 

Doni you sit! 

The election is near and you might just split! 

This poem written by 1992 First Colonial High School graduate 
Thad Nesuis. son ofKneeland and Carolyn Nesius ofKing'c Grant. He 
wrote it. and others, for his government class. Thad plans to be a liberal 
arts major this fall at Old Dominion University. 



VBS DEADLINES 

News deadlines for The Virginia Beach Sun arc: 5 p.m. Friday fw the 
upcoming Wednesday's issue. 

• Articles must be legible, preferably typed, double qnced on standard 
size paper. 

• lectures must be sharp, clear and accompanied with comptete infOTma- 
tion. (All persons in pk:hire must be identined.) 

• News may be brought or maile<l in and sfmuld include the tame and 
telephone numbers of the pers)ns submitting it 

• The Virginta Beach Sun welcomes and encourages letters from its 
readers on topics of general intovsL 

• All letters must carry the name and address of writo-. 

• Leuers shcxild be addres%d w: Editw. The Virginia BemAi Sun. 138 
Roscmont Road. Suite 209. Virginia Beach. Va. 23452. 




This past weekend, I headed over 
the West Virginia hills and back to 
my hometown 
of Mansfield, 
Ohio, for my 
fifth-year high 
school class re- 
I union. , 

I still can't 
believe it has 
been five whole 
, years since the 
Mansfield 
Christian 
"Qass of '87" 
went their own 
ways. It seems 
like just yester- 
day the high- 
lights of my life 
were weekend 
basketball 
games, prom, 
slumber parties 
—————— and class trips. 

Now, here I am, a college graduate 
pursuing a career in journalism , when 
I still feel like I should be writing for 
my yearbook and studying for math 
(something I don't miss!). 

After a good hour of primping at 
my house, I joined other early arriv- 



Slice of 
Life 

By Melanie 
Beroth, a New- 
town area resi- 
dent and profes- 
sional typesetter. 



als to watch my old classmates walk 
up the long driveway, generally two- 
by-two. I couldn't believe the num- 
ber of them who were eith^ married 
or engaged. 

There is so much to 

learn in the world, 

and while education 

is important, there 

is nothing like 
hands-on experience. 

At the age of 22. 1 often 

feel caught in the middle of being a 
teenager and being an adult. I don't 
have the responsibilities of having a 
family yet, but I also don't have time 
to be a frivolous 16-year-old again. 

Often, high school and college 
graduatesggo through a time of de- 
pression as they go out into the "real 
world." No longer are they consid- 
ered "youth" - they must work to live 
like everyone else. It is a shock to 
leave beUnd the high school/college 
fun and work hard. 40 hours a week. 

As I altered the woikforce. I was 



surprised^ discover that while I was 
considered "old" by my peers and 
family, interviewers didn't have the 
same outlook. Experience is what is 
important in today's society. 

As a result. I have decided to use 
this time in my life to gain both i^o- 
fessional and practical experience. I 
have convinced myself to be content 
in "whatsoever state I am in" and am 
detennined to keep that attitude. 

There is so much to learn in the 
world, and while education is impor- 
tant, there is nothing like hands-on 
experience. Whether it's balancing a 
checkbook or keeping a house in or- 
der, everyone needs practical experi- 
ence in how to live, and there is no 
better way to leatn than being on your 
own. 

In five more years, I will be facing 
mylOth-yearclassreunion. Because 
I live so far away. "Mansfield time" 
seem^ to stop in my mind. 

I know I will have changed again 
by 1997, but I will expect everyone 
else to be the same. According to 
reliable, more mature sources. I have 
a feeling I am going to be in for an 
even greater shock the next time 
around . 



Just A Chat 

with James E O'Brien 



James P. O'Brien, PhD., professor of psychology at 
Tidewater Community College's Virginia Beach cam- 
pus has been elected president-elect of the Virginia 
Academy of Science. The VAS was found in 1921 to 
promote scientific research and science education in 
the Commonwealth and includes more than 1300 Vir- 
ginia scientists, engineers, mathematicians and educa- 
tors in its membership. 
Name: James P. O'Brien. 
Nickname: Jim. 
Occupation: College professor. 
Neighborhood: Norfolk. 
Hometown: Richmond. 

How k>ng have you lived in Norfolk: 16 years. 
Last city you lived In before moving to Norfolk: 
Virginia Be^h. 
Age: 48. 

Marital status: Married to Mary Louise for 19 years. 
ChiMren: Christopher, 14. and Andrew, 10. 
What you love about your Job: The students. They 
are a diverse group with a committment to their educa- 
tion. 
What you hate about your job: Not enot^ lime. 
If you didn 't have your current job, you would be: 
A research and engineering psychologist, os o^ono- 
mist. 

Biggest accomplishnient in your Ufe: Raising my 
family. 
Secret to success: Commitment and dedication. 
If you could change one aspect of ytrar Ufe t* make 
it better, what would it be: I'd travel more w^th my 
family. 

What ik(^ people don't know about you to: How ' 
much I admire David LeOerman. 
Best personality trait: Family commitment. 
Worst personality trait: Procrastinating. 
Pet peeve: People who (ton't care, dwi't make a stand 
or think things through. 
Biggest quirk: I'm a [Mick rat 
If you had your life to live over agaia, n^at wouM 
you do differently: ftx*ably would have kept playing 
football in high school. 

If you won the ktttery, what wiHild you do iHtb tfac 
money; Give a chunk of it away, trav^ pay (^my Wlls, 
set up the education of my childrai and pandchifatoi. 
and sui^rt worthy causes, includuig tlw Virginia 
Academy of Science and the Virginia Jisuor Academy 
of Science. 

Fun evening: Playing volleyteill w going to Dumar's 
with my family for ice cr^m. 
Fun weekend: Paris. 

Dream vacation: Two months in Ireland, two 
months in Paris, two months in Italy, two months in the 
western part of the United Stales aid two months to rest 
iq) in Virginia. 
Favmlte mi^zJne: Sciemt^c American. 
I drive a: Mazda m.p.v. 
Dream car : A DeLMemi tlM runs on ^Mhk fuds w 



solar enCTgy. 

Favorite Sport: Volleyball. 

Favorite sports team: Washington Redskins. 

Who do you most admire: My parents. Bob and 
Polly O'Brien, buckminsier Fuller and Jesus Christ 

What do you like to do to relax after a hard day's 
work: Meet my wife at Uncle Louie's in Ward's Cwner 
wO'SulIivan's Wharf on Colley Avenue. 

Your favorite food and drink: Lobster and 
Guinness. 

Food you hate the most: Cauliflower. 

Favorite restaurant: TTie Blue Crab on Shore Drive. 

Favorite food to cook: Pizza. 

Favorite article of clothing: Fisherman's knit wool 
sweater I picked up in Canada, and a pair of wheat jeans 
from about 20 years ago. 

Favorite televishm pri^am: David Letterman 

FavcMite movie: Anything by Steve Martin. 

Your favorite type t^muiric: Country rock-folk. 

The happiest time in your life, so far: Right now. 

If you were to become famous, what would you 
ynnt to be famous for: Doing something that saves 
people's lives. 

What to the most fun time you have had in the past 
ynA: Listening to my kids teU j(*es. They have an 
(Nitragrous senx of humor. 

If you couM pick just two of the foltowing, which 
would you pick: brauu, looks, a good personality or 
wealth? Brains and a good personality. 

What do you think to one of the b^est probkimi 
facing the worki: Intoloance. 

What do you think to one of the biggest problems 
fadng Virginia Baich: The population growth. 

What do you like mi»t abmit Virgmia BoKh: 
Being nwr the ocean, the chang^ility that to always full 
of aupises and the people. 

If jm could spend 10 mteutes aiwic with the 
PmideBt George Bush, what would you talk 
about?: Spending more research m AIDS, the eco- 
nomic situation and leveling with the American peqjle 
about tte deficit and the iwed fw a social agoida for the 

country , which inclu(te the q^xsttmity fw people to be 
iMxe tolerant of our difference. 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. Ses- 
sions, Virginia 
Beach Sun col- 
umnist. 



House full 
of dogs, cats 
gets Sessions' 
attention! 



I had convinced myself that I was 
through writing about seagulls and 
cats. 

As a result of my articles, I have 
succeeded in turning the bleeding 
heart animal rights' activists against 
me. Several people that I thought 
were my 

friends have 
made it very 
clear that I am 
no longer 
personagrataas 
far as they are 
concerned. 

Recently, 
some nut 
threatened to 
attack me when 
my wife and I 
entered a res- 
taurant. In ad- 
dition, I didn't 
think my white 
house would 
look good if 
^~"^~^~~~"~ some kook de- 
cided to throw red paint on it. 

Then I read a story in the July 23 
edition of The Virginian-Pilot that 
proclaimed in bold type that "A full 
animal house is raided in Ghent." 

According to die story, a family of 
kind, animal-loving people had been 
arrested and charged with keeping an 
"unhealthy messy menagerie of 1 12 
rabbits, 88 cats (four dead) and 16 
dogs at a house in Ghent." 

In addition to the above, two mem- 
bers of the family have been charged 
with interfering with police. That 
evening on TV I watched the raid as 
it took place and it looked as if some 
desperate killer had barricaded him- 
self in the house and was shooting it 
out with the police. I expected the 
SWAT team and helicopter to arrive 
at any moment. They didn't bring 
any police dogs. I guess they felt that 
the 16 inside the house was enough. 

It was just inconceivable to me 
that such a stink would be made over 
this situation when everyday we hear 
pleas to be kind to animals. We are 
asked to help get them off the streets 
and tq give them homes. ^^^ ^^ 

That's exactly what tKis i'amily 
was doing. Sure they went too f^ to 
care for so many in such little space, 
but the intent was right. Many of 
those cats and dogs were strays, so 
the family took them in. 

It is obvious, at least to me, that 
from the interviews with this family, 
that they are compassionate, love 
animals and should be given the help 
that they so desperately need. One of 
the members of the family, Shirley 
Ferro, said "We just want our pets 
back so we can leave." 

They want to take theirpets to their 
32-acre farm in Maryland so that 
they can take batter care of them. 

If the animal rights' activists really 
mean what they say. and I have no 
reason to believe otherwise, then 
they should show the same interest in 
tliese good and decent people as they 
do the tumble bug and dirt dobbw. 

Every effort should be made to 
help the family get their pets back a) 
that they can return to their farm in 
Maryland. They deserve no less. 

Welcome to the real world. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

(USPS660-140) 
138 South Rosemont Road 

Suite 209 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 
Telephone: (804) 486-3430 

Publisher 
Hanes Byerly 

Assistant to the Publisher 

Managing Editor 

Greg Goldfwb 

Staff Writer 

M.J. Richaids 

Compos! tIcNi 

LoreUa Lomax 
Melanie Beroth 

The Virginia Beach Sun is pub- 
lished evwy Wednesday by Byerly 
PuUications, Inc., Franklin, Va. Sec- 
ond Class postage is paid at 
Lynnhiven Station. Virginia Beach, 
Va. Postmaster Send address changes 
to TTie Virginia Beach Sun, 138 South 
Rosemont Road. Suite 209, Virginia. 
Beach. Va. 23452. Subscription Rates: 
By mail addresses within 40 miles of 
Virginia Beach. Va..<meyear. $14.95, 
two years. $24.50. Virginia and North 
Cuolina, one year, $16.85, two years, 
$29.50. All other states one year, 
$22.00, two years. $34.50. Payable in 
advance. 

Other Bya-ly Publications news- 
papers: The Chesape'ake Post. The 
PorUmouth Times. The Tidewater 
News, Brunswick Timo-Gazette, In- 
dependent Messenger, Dinwiddie 
Monitor, The Petersburg Monitw. 



mmmmmmmmmmmm 




Virginia Beach Sun, Wednesday. July 29. 1992 3 




The Tidewater Regional Technical Rescue Team, and Virginia 
Beach's team, have been recognized nationally. 

Fire Department's 
search and rescue 
team in the top 25 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 



In 1985, after a series of inci- 
dents involving rescues of an 
extremely technical and dangerous 
nature, the Virginia Beach Fire 
Department set out to fill a gap in 
service delivery within the city of 
Virginia 
Beach. The 
formation of 
the depart- 
ment's 
Technical 
Rescue Team 
addressed the 
ability to 
provide 
trained 
firefighter/ 
technicians 
and equip- 
ment at the 
scene of any 
of the 
following 

types of 

incidents: 

• High-angle rope rescues. 

• Trench and underground 
collapse rescue. 

• Confined space entry and 
rescue. 

• Structural collapse search and 
rescue. 

• Tactical helicopter operations. 

• Large scale transportation 
exuications. 

Coupled with the local initiative 
came the formation of the Tidewa- 
ter Regional Technical Rescue 
Team, which involves the cities of 
Norfolk, Chesape^e, Portsmouth 
and Franklin, and Little Creek Fire 
and the Norfolk Naval Base Fire 
Department. Tliis team, coordi- 
nated by the Virginia Beach Fire 
Department, and the Tidewater 
Emergency Medical Services 
Council, has provided a multi- 
jurisdiclional response to technical 
rescues since 1985. 

As a result of the Virginia Beach 
Fire Department's involvement in 
the field of technical rescue over 
the last eight years, this department 
and city has become recognized 
nationally as one of the leados in 



Uiban search and 

rescue is a rapidly 

developing, yet still 

fledgling science 
which the Viiglnia 
Beach Fire Depart- 



ment began practic- 
ing eight years ago. 

training and response to technical 
rescue operations. In the aftermath 
of hurricane Hugo and the Loma 
Prieta earthquake, the federal 
government initiated an "Urban 
Search and Rescue System" 
designed to place trained teams and 
personnel anywhere in the United 
States to handle the search and 
rescue operations in collapsed 
buildings, especially concrete 
reinfOTced structures such as we 
witness in California at the 
Nimitz Freeway colliq)se. 

Because of the Virginia Beach 
Fire Dqwrtment's extensive 
backgrcHind in the areas of techni- 
cal rescue, which includes urban 
search and rescue, the department 
was asked to participate in the 
planning process and also asked to 
submit an a{)plication to be 
considered as one of the naticmal 
teams. After two years of planning 
by the federal government, an 
an)lication and selection criteria 
process was developed. As a result 
of this process the Virginia Beach 
Fire Department was asked to 
provide one of only 25 national 
urban search and rescue teams for 
response to catastrophic disasto^ 
within the United States, and 
possibly internationally. The 
Virginia Beach Fire Department 
will incorporate the Tidewater 
Regional Team into its rcspcmse 
team to continue the outstanding 
multicity cooperation we have 
experienced in the past 

D Sm search, Pag* 10 



First 25 Task Forces to 
Receive Grant Funding 



Arizona Phoenix Fire Department 

California City of Los Angeles Fire Department 

Los Angeles Country Fire Department 
Menio Park Fire Department 
Oakland Fire Department 
Orange County Fire Department 
RiversWe Fire Department 
Sacramento Fire Department 
San Diego Fire Department 
Cotorado State of Cotorado 

Ftorida Dade County/St. Petersburg 

Georgia State of Georgia 

Illinois Chteago Fire DepartmerM 

Indiana Marion County Fire Department 

MarylarKJ Montgomery County Fire Departnwnt 

Nebraska City of Lincoln 

Nevada C\aik County 

New Mexk» State of New Mexteo 

New Yorit New York City Polce, Fire and Rescue 

Pennsylvania Commonwealtti of Pennsylvania 
Tennessee Memphis/Shelby County Emergency 

Management Agency 
Utah State of Utah 

Virginia FaMax County Fire and Rescue Department 

Virginia Beach Fire Mpaitment 
Washington Pierce/King Counties 



You and education can turn things around 



Search and rescue teams are used in many emergency 
situations, including building collapses. 



We hear a great deal today about 
the shortcomings of our major insti- 
tutions - legislative, judicial, educa- 
tional. Many of the criticisms are 
unr«is)nable and unjust, and the crit- 
ics often seem to want to return to 
some mythical golden age that they 
should realize, 
ittlwy took time 
to reflect, has 
never existed. 
In frustration 
ovdik social 
change and eco- 
nomic inflation, 
those who criti- 
cize often as- 
sume that an 
acceptance of 
certain pat 
phrases and 
comforting fw- 
mulas and a 
crash program 
of educational 
reform can 
solve all our 
social problems 
____^__ overnight. 
They also assume that such drastic 
changes can be accomplished with- 
out cost. 

There is no question that many 
conditions in our lives today need 
changing. Indeed, they should be 
turned completely around. But there 
is nothing new in this. Classroom 




teachers have been in the business of 
turning things around ever since pub- 
lic education was first introduced in 
the United States. In our own cen- 
tury, the schools have been major 
forces in bringing about change in 
the an&s of social justice, conserva- 
tion, lie consuiictive use of tech- 
nologies, and the preparation of our 
young people to deal with the poten- 
tial problems of the future. 



Let's look at the 
changes that have been forged in 
the classroom over the past quarter 
century alcMie. Twenty-five years 
ago, throughout much of our nation, 
children and young people, as well as 
adults, were segregated by race. Al- 
though there was talk of separate- 
but-equal education, in fact two sepa- 
rate systems existed - one composed 
of wMte-skinned people suid the other 



The VBEA 
Report 

Lisa Guthrie, 
president of the 
Virginia Beach 
Education Asso- 
ciation. 



When critics attack our schools for neglect- 
ing basic edttcation. they forget that b asic 
education for today is entirely different from 
the simple reading, writing and 'rithme tic of 
a century ago. 



No matter where injustices and 
other difficulties have occurred in 
our society, the schools have been 
ready to meet the challenge by pre- 
paring students to cope with the often 
terrifying elements of change. 

When we hear criticism of our 
schools and universities, we should 
take a few minutes to consider that 
the very social and economic prob- 
lems that prompt the outrage of some 
critics are those the schools have been 
helping to solve every day. That is 
the best response we can give to the 
critics, and it is a response that is 
virtually unanswerable. 



On Perot, and promises 



President Bush 
has also betrayed 
the country's trust 

Along with millions of Ameri- 
cans, I was excited about the Perot 
grass-roots movement I signed the 
petition to put his name on the 
Virginia ballot because I believed 
he would add a new dimension to 
the same old political routine. His 
suaight talk was refreshing and 
seemed sincere. I trusted the man 
to keep his 
word, 

I had heard 
the Larry King 
Show that 
night in 
February 
when H. Ross 
Perot made a 
promise to run 
a world clSs ' 
campaign if 
that was what 
We the People 
wanted. To 
prove our 
sincerity, we 
were to put his 
name on the 
ballots of all 
SO states. 
That effort 
—^—^—— was proceed- 
ing well and surprising everyone. 

We the People were still 
working hard to accomplish this 
task when Perot suddenly, without 
warning, announced he was 
precipitously quitting the race. We 
were stunn«], disappointed. 




disillusioned and deeply hurt. He 
did not keep his promise. Now, we 
don't know whether to laugh or 
cry! 

Mr. Perot is a brilliant man and 
assured us many times that, as an 

Alas, our leaders are 

not gods, but fallible" 

men and women who 

sometimes forget us - 

We The People. 

engineer, he weighs all the options 
before su-iking a "deal." He could 
not have failed to consider early in 
the campaign that a three-way race 
might leave no candidate with a 
majority in the Electoral College, 
thus sending it to the House of 

Sm on, Pag* 7 



Lii's 
Quill 



Lillian Youell, 
board member, 
Virginia Consor- 
tium for Law-Re- 
lated Education. 



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composed of people of other races. 

It was in the classroom that this 
injustice was first att^ked success- 
fully on a large scale - and finally 
.abolished. And although we must 
recognize that many inequities still 
exist, we also must acknowledge that 
the unjust separation of peoples on 
the artificial basis of skin color has 
been made not only unlawful, but 
also unconscionable to the niajority 
of our citizens. 

In recent years also, young people 
whose primary language is not En- 
glish have been encouraged to active 
participation in our society through 
programs in bilingual-multicultural 
education made available to them in 
the schools. Special concerns for the 
children of the urban poor, of migrant 
workei^, of refugees from Southeast 
Asia - all of whom, without educa- 
tion, could be certain of only the 
dimmest possibility of success - have 
enabled the schools to offer promise 
and hope to those whose future was 
almost nonexistent because of the 
accidents of birth and economic cir- 
cumstances. Indeed, the schools have 
reversed the course of the future for 
many such young people. 



Every day the schools enable us to 
bring the generaticms closer logethn 
through parent participation programs 
and senior volunteer projects. In the 
classroom, too, boys and girls be- 
come concerned for the need 10 re- 
ward equal work with equal pay, to 
assure ihe achievement of women's 
goals in our society by learning to 
recognize ihe seriousness of women's 
objectives. Theyleammoreandmore 
of the contributions of women and 
minorities, as well as (he importantof 
rejecting useless and demeaning ste- 
reotypes. 

Through our schools, a long-ne- 
glected minority - the handicapped - 
are being offered enuy into the main- 
stream of our economy and society, 
so that they can have oppcHtunities to 
become productive members of the 
community, to hold jote, to have 
careers, to understand the nature of 
mainstream life, and to be under- 
stood as fully involved citizens. 

In the critical areas of 

preservation and conservation, the 
schools have responded to the need 
for improving our environment 
through study jM-bjects and commu- 
nity campaigns to restore polluted 
areas, preserve scenic beauty, and 
draw attention to threats to our sur- 
roundings. In the same way, they are 
pioneering the conservation of en- 
ergy and other natural resources by 
teaching our children what the cur- 
ren t problems arc and what our future 
concerns must be. In fact, teachers, 
building on the interests of young 
peq)le in such popular entertainments 
as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars," are 
turning the attention of students to- 
ward the solution of future problems 
that are posed by the expansion of 
technology and the shrinking of our 
universe. 

When critics attack our schools for 
neglecting basic education, they for- 

So* YOU, Pag* 7 



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4 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 29. 1992 

Krause, 
Old wed 

Mary-Eva Heller Krause and 

Christopher Charlton Old were 

married on Saturday, June 27 in the 

Langley Chapel, Langley Air Fotcc 

Base, Hampton. 
The double-ring ceremony was 

celebrated by Rev. Russell 0. Siler 

and Rev. Hany Vaiderfotd. 
The bride was given in marriage 

by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben 

Allen Krause of Virginia Beach. 

She is the granddaughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. Edgar Roitsch of La Grange, 

Tex. and the late Mrs. Meta Krause 

of Austin, Texas, and the late Mr.. 

Herman Krause of New Braunfels, 
Texas. 

The bridegroom is the son of 
Mrs. Siuidra Old of Chesapeake and 
Mr. Larry Old of Norfolk. The 
groom is the grandson of Mrs. 
Dorothy Harris and Mr. Wilton 
Harris, and Mr. and Nfrs. L.A. Old, 
Sr., all of Chesapeake. 

The bride carried a bouquet of 
champagne and mauve roses, 
creamy carnations, fireesia and hy- 




Erica Krause of Bryan, Texas, 
sister of the bride, was the maid of 
honor. The bridesmaids were Miss 
Beth Laster and Miss Nicole Borte 
of Virginia Beach and Miss Melanie 
Old of Chesapeake, sister of the 
groom. Each wore a mauve tea- 
length gown of polished cotton and 
carried arm bouquets of mauve 
roses, freezia and baby's breath, 
with cascaies of candlelight ribbon. 

Shelly Sykes of Virginia Beach 



Mr. and Mrs. Old 

served as flower giri. She wwe an 
ankle-length gown of candlelight 
cotton. 

Brian Lancaster served as best 
man. Robert Scott II and Chris 
Williams of Chesapeake served as 
groomsmen. The ring bearer was 
Joshua Krause, brother of the bride. 

An elegant reception was held at 
the Langley Officers Club. About 
150 guests enjoyed a buffet and 
danced to tunes played by the Katz 
'n Jammers Band of Virginia Beach. 
Table centerpieces were pinewood 
carousel horses surrounded by silk 
flowers and tulle. The three-tiered 
wedding cake repeated the carousel 
theme, with porcelain horees, hand- 
foimed flowers and ribbon. 

Krause is a 1992 honor graduate 
of First Colonial High School. Old 
is a psychology major at Old Do- 
minion University. After their 
honeymoon, the couple will reside 
in Norfcrfk. 




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4-H announces 
new group for kids 

The Virginia Be^h 4-H office is 
starting a new group called Court- 
house Cloverlmds. 

It is designed for children ages 
five to eight and meetings will be 
held at 7 p.Ri. every second and 
fourth Monday at the Courthouse 
United Methodist Church, 2708 
Mncess Anne Road. 

For more inf(»rmation call Bemie 
Hoirocks, leadCT. at 427-2220. 



Coin club to meet 

The Tidewater Coin Club will 
meet on Wednesday, August 12 at 
7:13 p.m. in meeting room 3 at the 
Lake Wright Motel, 6280 
Northampton Boulevard. 

The program will be a numis- 
matic quiz. Visitors are welcome. 

For further information call 499- 
8872. 



Single parents meet 

Single I^urents of Virginia Beach, 
Parents Without Partners Interna- 
tional, will meet every Monday in 
August at 7:30 p.m. at Saint An- 
drew's Methodist Church. 

Call 498-2666 for more informa- 
tion. 



Loxley's arrest 

Continuwi From Pag* 1 

the crime, as determined by a juve- 
nile court judge. 

"The magistrate found that there 
was enough evi<^ce to charge him 
(Loxley) with the offense and I'm 
not going to second guess the 
magistrate," Willis said. 

The Chesapeake police officer 
who Willis said arrested Loxley did 
not return a reporter's i^one call. 

Loxley has a medical office in 
Chesapeake on North Battlefield 
Boulevard and in Virginia Beach on 
bidepemlaice Boulevard. 



Mr. and Mrs. James 

Arredondo, 
James marry 

Miss Patricia Arredondo and 
Russell C. James exchanged vows 
on Saturday, June 13, at the Great 
Neck Park Gazebo, overlooking a 
scenic water view. 

Christine Richards was the maid 
of honor. Stacey Harper and 
Heather Delmore, nieces of the 
bride, were the M(tesmaids. 

Best man was Greg Taylor. 
Rene Arredondo, brother of the 
bride, and Christopher Kear, 
nephew of bride, were Uie ushers. 

The bride was given away by her 
parents, Raul and Rosa Arredondo 
ofFindlay, Ohio. 

TTie bridegroom, who is in the 
U.S. Army, is the son of Ronald 
and Peggy James of Virginia Beach. 

The couple will be stationed in 
Gemiany. 



"Tool Talk" set 

The Francis Land House will 
present "Tool Talk" on Saturday, 
August 8 firom 1 to 4 p.m. 

The program focuses on work 
tools used in early America, and is 
free and open to the public. 

The house is located at 3131 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

Call 340-1732 for more informa- 
tion. 





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THE ORIGINAL PAINTLESS DENT REMOVAL PROCESS 



Tricentenniai Committee 
unveils historic marl(er 

The Princess Anne Country Tricentenniai Committee 
recently concluded the celebration of the 300th 
anniversary of the creation of the county with a luncheon 
at the Francis Land House and a ceremonial unveiling of a 
historic marker near the municipal courthouse in Virginia 
Beach. Mayor Meyera E. Oberndorf and committee 
member Barbara M. Henley unveiled the marker, which 
recognizes the formation of Princess Anne County and its 
eventual merger with the city of Virginia Beach. The City 
Council-appointed committee also presented a $500 check 
to J. Curtis Fruit, clerk of the Circuit Court, for the 
preservation of a court minute book. In addition, the 
committee presented copies of their minutes, 
correspondence and celebration-related materials to 
Martha J. Sims, director of public libraries, for reposit 
in the archival collection. (Photo by Drerdre D. Stokes) 



ROWS luncheon on August 13 



The Retired Officers' Wives So- 
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The program will be, "Dancers 
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For reservations call 481-2357 or 
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Monday, August 10. The cost will 
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Virginia Beach Sun, Wednesday. July 29. 1992 5 




Virginia Beach fishing piers are usually busy, inset: Fred Feller, left; and Donald Coghill. 

Tight lines, fair sides 

"It's been a pretty good sununer so far, nothing special," 
said Fred Feller, captain of the Bobbie Lee, who runs daily 
deep sea fishing trips out of Rudee Inlet. 

Feller, 57, of Croatan, said people just love to fish, and 
they've been catching mostly sea bass and flounder using 
squid, provided as bait, on the boating expeditions. 

"A lot of people don't know much about fishing," he said. 
"We have mates on the boat that show them what they're 
doing." 

The cost is $18 per person, and boats leave daily from 
Rudee Inlet at 8 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. The fishing trip usually 
runs about four-and-a-half hours, and fishing is done be- 
tween 10 and 30 miles dff the coast 

The Virginia Beach Fishing Pier, located at 14th Street at 
the Oceanfront, has been turning up 2- to 3-pound bluefish, 
with many spot, mackerel and other fish. 

"You've got a lot of people who've never been to the 
ocean before, and they've just got to go fishing," said Don- 
ald Coghill, 55, an Oceanfront resident who has been a 
booth attendant at the pier fw 10 years. 

The pier is open 24-hours, and costs $4 plus tax per per- 
son. Coghill said that bait used varies, and so does the fre- 
quency of schools of fish. 

James Lynch of the Lynnhaven Inlet Fishing Pier off 
Shore Drive on Starfish Road said fishing has kept people 
busy, but there is quite a variety in what they arc catching. 

"Mostly spot, some roundhead, some people call them 
mullet, some flounder and small blues," said Lynch. 

He said most people use bloodworms as bait when fishing 
on the pier, which is open 24-hours a day until November 
and costs $4 plus tax per person. — M J.R. 




Mike Midnight, right, of Williamsburg helped John Fleet, 
left, of Chesapeake haul in his catch in a recent deep sea 
fishing trip out of Rudee Inlet. 



Newspaper's not 
going to run the 
city -Clyburn 



D Continued FromPag* 1 

from people about it," said Clyburn. 
"I think the Norfolk newsp^r has 
lost all of their credibility and I don't 
think the general public believes any - 
tfiing they read." 

Clyburn said that while there may 
not be a conspiracy between the Piloi 
and police officers to see Wall resign, 
the newspaper has been "irrespon- 
sible." 

"I feel like they haven't been fair 
or even professional in the way this 
has been handled." 

Clyburn said that the Pilot has been 
unfair to the city. 

"It seems to me they're printing 
everything they want to print and 
they're damning the city of Virginia 
Beach and the police force," said 
Clyburn. 

Baum said he heard one radio sta- 
tion announcer say "the paper's out 
to get Chief Wall." 

But Baum said that he thinks it is 
inappropriate for any council mem- 
ber to make decisions about "person- 
nel matters," and said he will leave 
the fmal personnel decision-making 
up to the city manager. 

Moss agreed, saying the city man- 
ager should handle the issue, then 
make any recommendations to City 
Council. 

"I commend theCity Council mem- 
bers for being responsible and not 
getting into the Gray," said Moss. "Just 
stay with the policy issues and wait 
until the issues are (brought in by 
Spore)." 

Councilman Louis Jones said he 
doesn't have all the facts on the issue 



of Wall, and said he also prefers to 
hear what Spore decides, then if nec- 
essary, the City Council "as a sitting 
body could take a position." But 
right now, Jones said he needs to fmd 
out the facts before he can make any 
decisions or form opinions. 

"I don't know what is fact and 
what isn't," Jones explained. "It's 
difficult to make a decision." 

Jones and several other council 
members, however, did say that they 
do not think that there is a conspiracy 
between the Pilot and the police 
association to have Wall step down, 
and Mayor Meyera Obemdorf has 
called for an investigation concern- 
ing the decrease in the arrest rate and 
traffic summons. 

Bob Mathcson, president of the 
Policeman's Benevolence Associa- 
tion, said that the associations have 
never "publicly" called for Wall's 
resignation and "never will," but has 
had talks with Spore. Malheson 
would not elaborate on what was 
said. 

Sergeant Nick Sitarski of the Vir- 
ginia Beach Sergeants Association, 
who was reportedly out of town at the 
time the survey results were leaked to 
ihePiht, wouldnotietumarepoiter's 
phonecalls. 

Wall has said that the atuicks on 
him and his department are "per- 
sonal," but declined to elaborate. 

Court records indicate, however, 
that a teenage son of a well known 
Pilot editor was convicted of drunk 
driving in Virginia Beach, within a 
year befwe a series of articles on 
"police brutality" in Virginia Beach 
began. 



Stamp club to meet at library 



The Virginia Beach Stamp Club 
will meet on Tuesday, August 1 1 at 
7:30 p.m. at Saint Gregory's 
Catholic Church's school library, 
located at 5345 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. 



The evening's program will be a 
talk by club president Joseph 
Coulboume on "hot items." Visi- 
U»3 are welcome. 

For further information call 499- 
8872. 




Sensational 




Older Americans* mental healthi: Mind over matters 



Research has shown that mental 
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on older people's physical health. 
For tliis and other reasons, more 
emphasis needs to be placed on the 
mental needs of older Americans. 
Unfortunately, many barriers exist 
that can prevent older peq)le from 
sedcing help. 



Aging and 
Mental Health 

One reason that may explain 
some of the lack of attention given 
to older people's mental health 
needs is the stereotype that depres- 
sion, fwgetfulness and other mental 
health problems are a normal part 



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of aging. This is not the case. 
These mental health conditions are 
not a part of normal aging. Mental 
illnesses are no different from any 
other disease, and ar0 generally 
treatable. Neither the illness, nor 
the act of seeking treatment means 
older people have personal weak- 
nesses or flaws. 

Like people of all ages, some 
older people develop serious mental 
health conditions, such as dementia, 
delirium, schizophrenia, chronic 
depression and anxiety. Many more 
face problems that are less severe - • 



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low morale, grief, loneliness, de- 
pression and low self-esteem. 

Causes of Problems 

Research suggests that mental 
health problems may be more 
common among older people in 
part due to stresses associated with: 

• Living with chronic health 
conditions and the constraints they 
place on independent and active 
lifestyles. 

• The loss of a spouse, friends, 
family memt>ers and other social 



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networks. 

• Isolation 

• Inadequate income. 

Mental health problems, which 
can take many forms, can be diffi- 
cult to recognize among older 
American^. They may be masked 
by physical complaints, hidden 
from family and friends, or misin- 
terpreted as a normal part of aging. 
Memory loss, for example, could 
be caused by depression, disease, 
overmedication or £amily trouble. 

Barriers to Care 

Access to mental health services 
can be very difficult for older 
Amoicans. These services may be 
hard to fmd and afford. The prob- 
lem is compounded by the fact that 



many mental health providers offer 
no services specifically for older 
adults. 

Most public and private health 
insurance programs - including 
Medicare and Medicaid - offer very 
little coverage for mental health 
care. Medicare's Part B, for exam- 
ple, covers only $250 worth of 
outpatient psychiatric services a 
year - the same amount it covered 
when Medicare was established 
nearly 25 years ago. 

Among the most common rea- 
sons older adults give for not seek- 
ing mental health services are lack 
of transportatiOT, lack of mobility, 
lack of energy, po<» health, lack of 
money, social stigma and embar- 
rassment and religious beliefs. 



Common sense about 
some common senses 



Everycme experiences changes in 
their five senses as their bodies 
grow older. For example, most 
everyone experiences some degree 
of vision or hearing loss in later 
years. Often, the changes can be so 
gradual you may not notice diem. 

Answer the following questions 
to determine if your visitxi and/or 



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hearing may have chan^: 

• Do you have trouble seeing 
things that are nearby? 

• Is %eing at night more diffi- 
cult that it used to be? 

• Have you noticed that you see 
more "floatCTs" (little b\3ck spots) 
when you look at the ^y or other 
light-colored background? 

• Do your eyes seem to make 
too many or too few tears? 

• Do you find people's words 
diffKTuIt to undentibKl? 

• Are you unable to notke soft 
sounds, such as a dripping faucet? 

• Do you hear a continual ring- 
ing iK)ise in the background? 

• Do sounds and other peopiels 
voices sound muffled? 

If you answered "yes" to any of 
these questions, see your docto^. 
And have your vision and hearing 
checked regularly - at least once h 
year. ' 



TOD AY 'S THE DAY 



STOPSMOKINd 



I ,. 



6 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 29. 1992 



II nLmv-^mmmmmmmmmK^^mmimmmmmmmmmmmm^^m^mmrmmmmmmf^^'fiiifffimwmmmmmm^m 



NEWS FROM THE 



• • 



I L I T A R 



• • • 



Capt. Nichols disestablishes CHSCW ONE, retires after 26 years 



Captain Loring B. "Nick- 
Nichols, USN, commander. Heli- 
copter Sea Control Wing ONE 
(HSCW-1), hauled down his pen- 
nant, first flown at the commis- 
sioning of the command in 1973, 
for the last time in a dual decom- 
missioning/retirement ceremony 
held recently at Naval Air Station, 
Norfolk, marking the end of his 26 
years of Naval SCTvice. 

As part of the Navy's downsizing 
efforts, Capt. Nichols, the ninth 
and final wing commander, for- 
mally disestablished HSCW-1 fol- 
lowing 19 years of LAMPS MK I 
operations. While the disestablish- 
ment of this headquarters closes one 
chapter in LAMPS history, the 
challenges facing LAMPS today in 
supporting the missions of 
combatant ships at sea have never 
been greater. LAMPS MK I 
squadrons will now join the newer 
LAMPS MK III squadrons under 
the leadership of commander, Heli- 



coptCT Anti-Submarine Light Wing 
ONE, in Mayport, Fla., thus con- 
solidating all east coast LAMPS 
squadrons. 

Captain Nichols was 

born May 31, 1944 in Boston, 
Mass. He graduated from Marquette 
University in June 1966 with a 
B.A. in English. Following 
graduation he entered flight training 
and was designated a naval aviator 
in August 1967. Later he earned an 
M.A. in Human Resources Man- 
agement from Pepperdine Univer- 
sity. 

Captain Nichols first operation 
assignment was split between two 
squadrons, HS-5 and HS-7, at 
Quonset Point, R.I. He reported to 
HS-S in January 1968 and trans- 
ferred to HS-7 prior to its recom- 
missioning in April 1970. While 
assigned to HS-1 in February 1971, 
Capt. Nichols served as a flight in- 
structor. In October 1973, he was 



Lutton named officer of the quarter 




Capt. Lutton 



Air Force Captain Russell T. 
Lutton has been named officer of 
the quarter at McClellan Air 
Force Base, Sacramento, Calif. 

Selection was based on the 
individual's exemplary duty 
performance, job knowledge, 
leadership qualities, significant 
self-improvement and other ac- 
complishments. 

Lutton, an operation chief, is 
the son of Russell S. and Lisa- 
betty F. Lutton of 110 Bob 
White Stteet, Portsmouth. 

His wife, Margaret, is the 
daughter of Charies T. and Mable 
W. Nolan of Cedar Crest, N.M. 

The captain is a 1970 graduate 
of Woodrow Wilson High 
School, and a 1974 graduate of 
Old Dominion University, Nor- 
folk. 

He received a master's degree in 
1991 from the Air Force Institute 
of Technology, Wright-Patterson 
Air Force Base, Ohio. 




Capt. Nichols 



Navy Family Services to host career 
transition worlcshop on August 12 



FOR HOMEBUYERS ONLY 

I will find what you want at the best price and do all 

of your legwork while keeping your best 

interests in mind. 

Take the hassle out of buying 

Call: Larry Anderson 

(Buyer's Broker) 
487-3980 or 484-1717 
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BUDGET rEES FOR ALL ROUWiE LEGAL SERVICES 

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CHESAPEAKE 
NORFOLK 



547-8080 



VA BEACH 
PORTSMOUTH 



1 34 BATTLEFIELD BLVD. S ( j MILE FROM COURT COMPLEX) CHESAPEAKE 



By KAREN CADMAN 
Spedat Report 

Retiring? Leaving the military 
service? 

Colonel Doug Carter, USAF, 
retired, will present a two-hour ca- 
reer transition briefing on 
"Marketing Yourself For A Second 
Career." The brief will be given at 
the Theater, Building U-40, at 
Naval Air Station Norfolk, on 
Wednesday, August 12 at 8 a.m. 
This is a free i»«sentation. 

Colonel Carter inuoduces the 
audience to tiie realities of the 
civilian job market, rejection 
shock, resume writing, networicing, 
job interview strategy, salary nego- 
tiation and more. He doesn't 
promise an individual instant job 
search success. However, he does 
guarantee that each person who at- 
tends his lecture will profit from 
the knowledge gained and be ready 
to move in the right direction to- 
ward Iheir second career. 

This briefing is open to all, but 
is of special interest to officers, 
chiefs and senior petty ofHcers who 
are within two years of leaving ac- 
tive duty. Spouses are also invited 
to attend. Each person who attends 
the briefing will have an opportu- 
nity to ask questions and will re- 
ceive a copy of the publication, 
"Marketing Yourself For A Second 
Career." 

Colonel Carter is the director of 



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the Officer Placement Service for 
the Retired Officer Association and 
travels nationwide addressing mili- 
tary audiences composed of people 
who are nearing retirement or ppt- 
ing to leave military service. 
Praised by base commanders for his 
depth of knowledge and dynamic 
delivery, Colonel Carter pointedly. 
discusses all the pros and cons re- 
garding retirement and the civilian 
job market. One attendee remarked, 
"It was the best re-enlistment pitch 
I heard." But for those who have 
made up their mind to leave the 
service; there is a wealth of helpful 
information. 

Whether or not you have previ- 
ously attended or plan to attend 
other transition programs, such as 
the Transition Assistance Program 
(TAP), the benefit of an additional 
point of view cannot be overem- 
phasized. Receipt of the publication 
alone is worth the effort to attend, 
and coupled with Colonel Carter's 
expert, candid presentation, makes 
the morning of August 12 a valu- 
able opportunity that should not be 
overlooked. 

No reservations are necessary. If 
you have questions, please call the 
Navy Family Services Center, 
Norfolk, at 444-2102. Don't let this 
information pass you by. 

Anger workshop set 

If you are active duty militiuy and 
experiencing w(»k-related anger and 
frustration, take advantage of this 
workshop offered by NFSC Nwfolk. 

"Buikling Effective Anger Man- 
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stop whkh b^ins August S £nmi 3 
to 5 pjn., and runs through Septem- 
ber 10. 

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selected for the Personnel Exchange 
Program with the United Kingdom. 
As a member of the 820 Naval Air 
Squadron he flew the Sea King 
HAS MK I aircraft from the deck of 
HMS Blake on three extencted de- 
ployments. 

Upon return to the United States, 
Captain Nichols served a two-year 
tour as an anti-submarine warfare 
instructor at the Fleet ASW Train- 
ing Center in Nwfolk, before re- 
porting to HSL-30 for training in 
the SH-2F helicopto-. In June 1978 
he report^ to HSL-32 and served as 
maintenance officer, operations of- 
ficer, and officer-in-cliarge of De- 
tachment SIX onboard USS Miller 
(FF-1091) which was deployed to 
the Persian Gulf during the Iranian 
hostage crisis. 

In January 1981, Captain 
Nichols returned to HSL-30 to 
save as the executive officer until 
May 1982. In September he re- 
ported to HELTRARON EIGHT to 



save as the Executive Officer and 
in January 1984, he assumed com- 
mand. At the completion of his 
tour as CO, Captain Nichols re- 
ported to USS Inchon (LPH-12) 
where he served as operations offi- 
cer until August 1987. He then was 
assigned to the staff' of Commander 
Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic 
Fleet as the Force ASW training 
and readiness officer. Captain 
Nichols reported to commander. 
Helicopter Sea Control Wing ONE 
as the ninth and final Wing com- 
mander in July 1989 and served un- 
til its decommissioning. ' 

Captain Nichols is married to the 
former Janice Irene McGrath of 
Buffalo, New York. They have two 
children, a daughter, Joy, who is a 
recent graduate of Cornell Univer- ' 
sity and a son, Scott, a junior at 
Saint Bonaventure University. 

THs article was submitted cour- 
tesy of the U.S. Navy. 



Virginia Beach native Pvt. 2 Bettis is 
tops in training in Freidberg, Germany 




Bettis 



Pvt. 2 Jeffrey N. Bettis, a Virginia 
Beach native stationed in Germany, 
has the distinction of being assigned 
to the only U.S. Amy Europe tank 
company ever to 
have four of its 
14 tank crews 
get perfect 
scores at gun- 
nery. 

A perfect 
score is 1,000. 
The company's 
other 10 crews 
all scored above 
900 during a re- 
cent trip to the 
range. 

Bettis, a 1990 graduate of Salem 
High School, is a member of one of 
the top tank crews. Twice a year, his 
company - Company D, 4th Battal- 
ic«i, 67th Armor Regiment, 1st Ar- 
mored Division - travels from their 
kaseme, north of Frankfurt, to one of 
the U.S. Army Europe's Major train- 
ing areas in Vavaria. At the 
Grafenwoehr Training Area, they take 
their Ml-Al Abrams tanks to the 
ranges, where they test their skills at 
fuing their guns and maneuvering. 
"A score of 1 ,000 means our crew 's 
hard work really [md off," said Bettis, 
who drives an M-1 tank. 

A tank crew consists of a gunner, 
an ammunition loader, a driver and a 
tank commander. Before heading to 
the range to fue live ammunition. 



tank crews train on a tank simulators 
called UCOFTs - or Unit Conduct of 
Fire Trainers. The UCOFT improves 
hand-to-eye coordination and accu- 
rately simulates what tankers see from 
the inside of a real tank. 

After working with the UCOFT, 
the tankers move outside to a small 
training area near Friedberg. Finally, 
they had to Grafenwoehr, where they 
fire live ammunition and maneuver 
their tanks over larger distances. Af- 
ter two trips toGrafenwoehr and more 
complicated training with computer 
simulators, they head to the U.S. 
Army's Combat Maneuver Training 
Center at Hohenfels, where they take 
their tanks into battle against a U.S. 
Army unit highly-trained in potential 
enemy tactics. 

"Our perfect score at tank gunnery 
proves that hard training pays off," 
said Bettis, who s been in the Army 
nine months. "It also shows me I've 
PQme a long way in a short time. It 
tells me I should keep exceeding my 
daily goals as well as my goals set for 
life. It tells me I can do things." 

Bettis U-ansferred to Germany six 
months ago and will ret;um to the 
United States in September 1994. 

"I don'tknow where the Army will 
send me," Bettis said, "but I know 
that one day, I'll return home to Vir- 
ginia Beach. 

Tlus article was submitted cour- 
tesy of the U.S. Army. 



Consaul relieves Lipscomb as CO at 
Submarine Training Facility, Norfolk 



By JOSEPH MOSHER 
Special Report 

C!q)tain Warren N. Lipscomb, Jr. 
was recently relieved by Capt. H. 
Parker Consaul, III as the com- 
manding officer of Submarine 
Training Facility in Norfolk. 

The ceremony was held at Sub- 
marine Training Facility. The guest 
spaker for the event was the chief 
of naval technical training. Rear 
Admiral Roger L. Rich. Jr. 

Lipscomb, who became SUB- 
TRAFAC, NORVA's Cwnmanding 
Officer on July 3, 1991 has been 
assigned as the deputy commander 
and chief of staff at the Operational 



Test and Evaluation Force Atlantic. 

Under the leadership of Lip- 
scomb. SUBTRAFAC NORVA 
concentrated on customer service. 
The qtiality seviicc provi^ to the 
submarine fleet is measured by fleet 
readiness. 

Consaul comes to SUB- 
TRAFAC, NORVA after a 
successful tour as commanding of- 
ficer of the USS Michigan (SSBN 
727) (BLUE): the Michigan is a 
Trident class ballistic missile sub- 
marine. Consaul is looking forward 
to the mission and challenges of 
commanding Submarine Training 
Facility in Ntvfolk. 



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Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 29. 1992 7 



Cancer unit to hold auction 



By BARBARA KOEPPEN 
Special to The Virginia Beach Sun 

The Virginia Beach Unit of the 
American Cancer Society is spon- 
soring its first annual art auction on 
Friday, July 31 at Marina Shores 
Marina, 2100 Marina Shores Drive. 

Guests shall survey the art work 
in the Yacht Club, with its veranda 
and relaxing view of the Chesa- 
peake Bay. Beer, wine and heavy 
hors d'oeuvres will be served. 

Cocktail hour begins at 6:30 
p.m., and the art auction follows at 
7:30 p.m. Cost is $15 pa- person. 

Tickets may be purchased in ad- 
vance either from Ship's Store at 
Marina Shores or by contacting the 
American Cancer Society; tickets 
will also be available at the door. 

With artwork donated by local 
and regional artists, the auction will 
benefit the Virginia Beach Unit of 
the American Cancer Society. The 
money will be used for research, 
education and patient sovices in the 
community. 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



For more information about the 
art auction, contact Colleen Lucas 



with the American Cancer Society 
at 853-6638. 



On Perot, and promises 



$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



MAKE 

MONEY 



$ 
$ 

$ 
$ 

$ 
$ 
$ 



a Continued From Pago 3 

Representatives. So I can not 
accq)t this reason for withdrawing. 

Americans want to trust their 
leaders. Perhaps the one thing we 
still demand of them is honesty. 
We will not tolerate a person who 
lies to us, deceives us, or makes 
promises he can't keep. President 
Nixon was, in many respects, a 
great president But when he lied 
to us, he, no longer held our oust 
and he had to go. 

President Bush has also betrayed 
our trust. Read the full text of his 
pledge of no new taxes. Even 
before he said those damaging 
words, "^read my lips," he asserted 
that under no circumstttice, and he 
even qieiled out possible scenarios, 
would he raise taxes. He did and 
lost our trust. It was a kind of 
betrayal. We will know in Novem- 
ber whether he has been forgiven. 

The Democratic Party seems to 
have been revitalized and the 
standard bearers appear lo be two 
intelligent and attractive young 
men. Will they keep their prom- 
ises? Can we trust them? We the 
People are sick and tired of putting 
our &ith in teaders who let us 



down. Many now feel so alienated 
and embittered, Ifaey may not vote 
at all. 

Years ago, I became a &n of Lin 
Yutang, the Chinese poet, political 
philosopher, and essayist. In his 
book. Between Tears cmd Laugh- 
ter, i^vrnM: "I tun troubled by 
the question of ruthl^s honesty 
and whether it is worthwhile. The 
question not whether it is worth- 
while to myself but to the public. I 
have decided it is wcvthwhile." 

With those comments, he 
inomised to be honest with his 
readers as he shared his insights. 
"Sometimes, i»ovided the mind 
has sufficient moral and intellec- 
tual strength, it turns futile rage 
and sccmh into a comedy of 
sparkling teas and laughter . . . 
Sometimes there is more laughter 
than tears, and sometimes you feel 
so ch(dced you can neither weep 
nor laugh." 

Alas, our leaders are not gods, 
but fallible men and women who 
sometimes fwget us - We the 
People, especially the dreamers. 
Sadly, the fonder we become of 
our ideals, the greater our heart 
breaks when our leaders fail to live 
up to our expectations. 



FAST! 

This exciting' oppor 
$ tunity may be just for $ 
$ you. $ 

$ Your organization $ You and education can turn things around 

$ can earn extra money 5 
$ fast and easy soliciting 5 
$ subscriptions to your $ 
j; local community news- $ 
$ paper. $ 

$ For more informa- $ 
$ tion, call 547-4571 and $ 
$ ask to speak to someone $ 
$ about CAMPAIGN 50. $ 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



D ContlnuMl From Pago 3 

get that basic education for today is 
entirely different from the simple 
reading, writing and 'rithmetic df a 
ceatary ago. Hiey ignore the fact that 
teaches have been dealing with the 
explosion of knowledge that must be 
transmitted to students. Here, as in so 
many other areas, the schi. "^h have 
begun to make use of the nev.' tech- 
notogies - television, film, comput- 
ers, and hand-held calculators, to 



Consolidated Report of Condition 

Princess Anne Commercial Bank 

of Virginia Beach, V A 

And Foreign and Domestic SubiidlariM, • member of the Federal Keiervc Syitam, at ike 
close ofbusines on June 30, 1992, pubUsiied hi accordance Willi • call made by tkcFedcral 
Reserve Bank of this district pursuant l« the provialons of Oe Federal Scmtv* AcL 

ASSETS 

1 . Cash and balancei due from deposittny ini titutiani : ThoUMnds of dotaf* 

a. Noninterett-bearing balanocf and currency and coin (1,2) 5,027 

b. Interest-bearing balances (3) 

2. Securities (from Schedule RC-B) 13,213 

3. Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agiecments to reidl: 

a. Federal funds sold (4) 4370 

b. Securities purchased under ag r ee men ts to resell (S) „ 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned income 
(from Schedule RC-C) 39,915 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 776 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve 

d. Loans and Leases, iwt of uneanied income, 
allowance, and reserve (item 4.a minus 4.b and 4.c) „ 39,139 

5. Assets held in trading accounts 

6. Premises and fixed assets (including cafHtalized leases) 668 

7. Other real esute owned 272 

8. Investments in unconsolidated subiidiaiies and usodated companies 

; 

9. Customers' liability to this banlc on acceptance outstanding « 

10. Intangible assets (from Schedule RC-M) 

U. Other assets (from Schedule RC-F) 641 

12. a. Total asseu (sum of items 1 through 11) 63,400 

b. Losses deferred punuant to 12 U.S.C. 18230) (f^*^ Sdiedule RC-M) 

c Total asseu and losses deferred punuant to 12 U.S.C. 1 8230 

(sum of items 12.a and 12.b) 63,400 

LIABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices (sum of totals 

of columns A and C from Sdiedule RC-E) 60,046 

(l)Noninteresl-beaiing(l) 17,793 

(2) Interest-bearing 42,253 

b. In fixeign offlces, Edge and Agreonem subsidiaries, and IBFs 

(1) Noninteresl-bearing 

(2) Interest-bearing 

14. Federal funds purchased and wcuritiea sold under agreemett to reporchase: 

a. Federal funds purchased P) 

b. Securities sold under agtecmenu to repurchase (3) 

15. Demand notes issued tothe U.S. Treasuiy 

16. Other boirowed money 

17. Mortage indditedness and obligatians unda capitalized leases 

18. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstmdmg 

19. Subordinated notes aid debentures ~0 

20. Other liabiliues (from Schedule RC-G) 195 

21. Toul liahlitiei (sum of items 13 ihrou^ 20) 60,241 

22. Limited Ufe preferred stock and iclated surplus .0 

EQUTFY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual prefeited stodc and idaied surplus 

24. ComuMn stodc 1.457 

25. Swplus (exclude all surplus rdated to {wrfetred stock) 1,677 

26. a. Undivided proliu and capital reserves 25 

b. LESS: Net unrealized loss on maiketable equity seomiies 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustments 

28. a. Toul equ^ capital (sum of items 23 through 27) 3,1M 

b. Losws deferred pursuant to 12 VS.C 1823(i) 

( from Schedule RC-M) 

c Total equity capital and losses d^en«d pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823<i) 
(sum of lions 28.a and 28.b) - 3,159 

29. Total liabilities, limited-life prkerred stodt, equity capital, nd k>ss«s5 
defoied pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j) (sun of items 21, 22. and 2l.c) 

„63,400 



I, Clara Mae Hudgins, Assistant vice-presidenl^shier of the aboveHumed huk do hereby 
declare that this Report of Condition has been pn^red in Mmfonnance with the insnucaons 
usued by the Boanl of Governors of the Federal Reserve System tad the State Banking 
Authority and is tnie to the best cf my knowtedge nd belief. 

Oara Mk Hudgins 
We, the undersigned diredon, tttest to the <»rrecuiess of this Report of CooditfoB and declare 
that it has been examined by us and to tlw bat of our knowUalge and belief hat been piepaiwJ 
in (xinrormarK:e with the inslructioBS issued by the Board of Govemon of the Federal Retove 
System and the State Banking Authority and is tnie «id correct 

J. MMgan Davis 
Thomas J. Decker, Jr. 
J(dm P. Hnrit 
State of Virgmia. County of Virginia Beach at: Sworn » and «*scifl»d bafcie me *it 22wl 

day of My, 1992 

Mary J. Andenta 
Notary PttWc 



name but a few - to bring this vast 
complex of knowledge to today's 
young people. 

Yes, our schools can turn things 
around, and they do - every day of our 
lives. But they can do so much more 
effectively aiid noticeably if we as 
parents and citizens help them. 

What can we do? 

Many things, actually. Here are 
but a few of them: 

• Support local school bond is- 
sues to help maintain valuable school 
programs. 

• Make sure that teachers are given 
a fair chance to teach our children by 
doing ^1 we can to help reduce class 
size. 

• Try to make sure that standard- 
ized tests are not used for discrimina- 
tory purposes for our children or any 
otIwrcMldren. 

• Try to counter unfair public 
criticism as intelligently and patiently 
as we can by pointing out to critics 
the positive aspects of our schools' 
programs. 

• Be sure that we understand what 
the purposes of the school'sprograms 
are and what the school's expecta- 
tions of our children are. 

• Work with teachers to help our 
children's learning by attending par- 
ent-teacher conferences, being as 
helpful as we cmi be in communicat- 
ing with teachersaboutourchildren's 
problems, and helping to see that 
homework and other school-related 
activities are carried out as expedi- 
tiously as possible. 

These are but a few of the many 
things we can do to help education 
solve our problems and right the 
wrongs that still exist around us. Only 
when we are fully involved can we 
truly help education turn things 
around. 

I PubUc Nolte» I 

OFFICE OF THE COMMIS- 
SIONER OF ACCOUNTS 

CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, 
VIRGINIA 

JULY 22, 1992 

DUNCAN R. DEVEREUX, 
DECEASED 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64.1-171, as 
ammded. Code of Virginia, that the 
undersigned Commissioner of Ac- 
counts, having been requested by 
Anne B. Shumadine and Townsend 
W. Devercux, Co-Executors and 
Co-Trustees of the Estate of Dun- 
cim R. Devemix, deceased, has ^- 
pointed the 19th day of August. 
1992, at 3:00 P.M., at 129 South 
Great Neck Road, Virginia Be«^, 
Virginia, 23454. as the time and 
place for receiving proof of (tebts 
and demands against the decedent or 
his estate. 

Stanley A. Phillips, Commis- 
sions of Accounts 

31-9 
It7-29VBS 



Pubic NoNc* 



NOnCEOF 
PUBUC HEARING 

Virginia: The r^ultf mating of 
the City Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held in the 
CoiBicil Chambos of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, 
Princess Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on Tuesday, 
August 11, 1992 at 2:00 p.m.. at 
which time the following 
app^caikms will be iManL- 

CHANGE OF ZONING 

DISTRICT CLASSIFirATfON: 



PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH 

1. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Joseph Preziotti, Jr., 
Design Graphics, Inc., for a 

Conditional Change of Zoning 
Pistrici Classification from R-SD 
Residential Duplex District to 0-1 
Office Disffict on the West side of 
N. Landstown Road, 4(X) feet more 
or less south of Monet Drive. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change is for office land use. TTie 
Comprehensive Plan designates this 
site for businessAesearch use. Said 
parcel is located at 18S7 N. 
Landstown Road and contains 2.3 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH 

2. An Ordinance upon 
Application of Christopher 
Ulman/East-West Foreign Car 
Service, Inc., for a Conditional Use 
Permit for an automobile service 
and repair establishment on Lots S, 
6. 7, 8 and Lots 17 through 20, 
Block 6, Virginia Beach Annex #2. 
Said parcel is located at 849 
Virginia Beach Boulevard and 
contains 28,314 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

3. An Ordinance upon 
Application of The Church of St. 
Gregory The Great for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
church expansion on certain 
property located at 5345 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 16.3 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

KEMPS VILLE BOROUGH 

4. An Ordinace upon 
Application of Indian River 
Golforama, Inc., for a Conditional 
Use Permit for a recreational 
facility of an outdoor nature (mini- 
golf) on the east side of S. Military 
Highway, 930 feet more or less 
south of Indian River Road. Said 
parcel is located at 920 South 
Military Highway and contains 
18.5 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGR 

STREET CLOSURE: 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH 

5. Application of Herman, Inc., 
for the discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a 20 foot unnamed 
lane located between 2nd Street and 
3rd Street beginning at the eastern 
boundary of Pacific Avenue and 
running an easterly direction a 
distance of 119.42 feet. Said parcel 
contains 2365.5 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

If you are physically disabled, 
hearing or visually impaired and 
need assistance at this meeting, 
please call DONNA JOHNSTON at 
427-4283 VOICE or TDD by 
August 7, 1992. 

31-10 
2t8-5VBS 



Public Notice 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Wednesday, August 12, 
1992 at 12:00 Noon in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall Build- 
ing, Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. A brief- 
ing session will be held at 9:00 
a.m. in the City Manager's Confer- 
ence Room, City Hall Building. 
PLANNING COMMISSION AC- 
TION IS NOT A HNAL DETER- 
MINATION OF THE APPLICA- 
TION. BUT ONLY A RECOM- 
MENDATION TO THE CITY 
COUNCIL AS THE VIEWPOINT 
OF THE PLANNING COMMIS- 
SION. FINAL DETERMINA- 
TION OF THE APPLICATION IS 
TO BE MADE BY CITY COUN- 
CIL AT A LATER DATE. AFTER 
PUBLIC NOTICE IN A NEWS- 
PAPER HAVING GENERAL 
CIRCULATION WITHIN THE 
CITY. 

THOSE MEMBERS OF THE 
PUBLIC INTERESTED IN AT- 
TENDING THE PUBLIC HEAR- 
ING SHOULD BE ADVISED 
THAT. FOR REASONS THE 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
DEEMS APPROPRIATE. CER- 
TAIN ITEMS ON THE AGENDA 
MAY BE HE^D OUT OF OR- 
DER AND THAT IT SHOULD 
NOT BE ASSUMED THAT THE 
ORDER LISTED BELOW WILL 
BE EXACTLY FOLLOWED 
DURING THE PUBLIC HEAR- 
ING. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of the items on this agenda suggest 
that certain conditions be attached 
to approval by City Council. 
However, it shcHild not be assumed 
that those conditions constitute all 
the conditions that will ultimately 
be aiiached to the project. Staff 
agencies may impose further condi- 
tions and requirements during ad- 
ministration of applicable city 
ordinance 

REGULAR AGafPA: 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
1. Ai^ieal fftm Decisions of 
Adminiwattve (Mcen m rq^ lo 



certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Charles 
C. Hickman. Properly is located 
on the east side of General Booth 
Boulevard north of Ferrell Paricway. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

2. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Peggy 
& Samuel Taggart. Property is lo- 
cated on the east side of Woodstock 
Road. 375 feet south of Oak Terrace 
Drive. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT : 

3. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Firsthealth Care 
Corporation (Medicenter - Virginia 
Beach) for a Conditional Use 
Permit for a convalescent/nursing 
home at the northeast intersection 
of First Colonial Road and Camelot 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
1148 First Colonial Road and 
contains 2.65 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Edna D. Gibbs for a Condi- 
tional Use Permit for automobile 
sales & repairs on the north side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, west of 
King Richard Drive. Said parcel is 
located at 3330 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and contains 1.46 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Applcia- 
tion of Princess Anne Country 
Club for a Conditional Use Permit 
for a recreational facility of an 
outdoor nature (golf course) at the 
southeast intersection of Shore 
Drive and First Court Road. Said 
parcel is located at 4137 First Court 
Road and contains 254.65 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

STREET CLOSURE: 

6. Ai^lications of Lawyers Title 
Insurance Corporation for the dis- 
continuance, closure and abandon- 
ment of a portion of Jade Street be- 
ginning at the nortiiem boundary of 
Page Avenue and running in a 
northerly direction a distance of 595 
feet. Said parcel is 60 feet in width 

and contains 35,700 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

RECONSIDERATION O F 
CONDITIONS: 

7. Applications of Sentara Life 
Care Corporation for the 
reconsidmition of conditions placed 
on the application for a conditional 
use permit for a 120-bed nursing 
home and an 80-bed home for the 
aged on November 13, 1990. 
noperty is located on die west side 
of Spruce Su^et, 300 feet more or 
less north of South Boulevard. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENTS : 

8. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach to amend and reordain 
Chapter 23 of the Code of the City 
of Virginia Beach, Virginia by 
adding a Section 23-61 movie ar- 
cades. 

9. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia to amend and 
reordain Section 1 1 1 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
definition of an adult bock store. 

10. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia to amend and 
reordain Section 901 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to use 
regulations for adult book stores in 
the Business Districts. 

11. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia to amend and 
reordain Section 1511 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to use 
regulations for adult book stores in 
the RT-2 Resort Tourist District. 

12. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia to amend and 
reordain Section 1521 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to use 
regulations for adult book stores in 
the RT-3 Resort Tourist Disttict. 

13. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia to amend and 
reordain Section 901 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to use 
regulations for eating and drinking 
establishments in the Business 
Districts. 

14. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Vir^nia to amend and 
reordain Section 1001 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to use 
regulations for eating and drinking 
establishments in the Industrial 
Districts. 

15. Motiffli of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia to amend and 
reordain Section 1511 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to use 
regulations for eating and drinking 
establishments in the RT-2 Resort 
Tourist District. 

16. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia to amend and 
reordain Section 1520 of the City 
Zoning Odinance p«taining to use 
regulations ((x eating and drinking 
establishments in the RT-3 Rescxt 
Tourist District. 

DEFERRED BY PIANNINC. 
COMMISSION ON 7/JW? 

17. An Ordinsice upon Af^Iica- 
Uon of WIUAMCO Develqwicni 
CorpCTaUon fw a Conditimml Use 
Permit for filling a borrow pit on 
the cast side of Barrs R«k1, 98.90 
fwt north of Evelyn Aveni^. Said 
parcel is locked at 1256 Barrs R(»d 
and contains 3.44 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROWH. 



18. Motion of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach to amend the Chesa- 
peake Bay Preservation Area Ordi- 
nance pertaining lo, but not limited 
to, Resource Management Area 
Designation, the mmtidal wetlands 
definition, erosion and sediment 
conU'ol for nonconforming struc- 
tures and uses, swimming pool ex- 
emptions, the definition of redevel- 
opment, water dependent facilities, 
the default load for stormwater 
management, intensely developed 
areas and a definition of public 
roads. More detailed information is 
available in the Planning Depart- 
ment. 

All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 

Planning Director 

31-8 
2t8-5VBS 

I Public NoWce I 

Take notice that on Wednesday, 
July 29, 1992 from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m., Virginia Beach Motor Com- 
pany at 1237 Oceana Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23454. 
will be taking bids on the follow- 
ing vehicle: 

1989 Honda Civic, 2 door 
(NFCU Repo). Contact Bob Curl- 
ing at 428-2663. 

31-7 

^ U7-29VBS 

Public Notice I 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 17lh day of 
July. 1992. 

In re: Adoption of MANDY 
MARIE SILBERNAGLE 

By; ERRON WADE 
WOODARD and LEIGH AN 
WOODARD, Petitioners 

To: Mr. Jeff Straughter. General 
Delivery, Jacksonville. Florida 
32244 

IN CHANCERY 

#CA92-164 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came ERRON WADE 
WOODARD and LEIGH ANN 
WOODARD. Petitioners, and rep- 
resented that the object of this pro- 
ceeding is to effect the adoption of 
the above named infant, MANDY 
MARIE SILBERNAGLE by ER- 
RON WADE WOODARD. and 
LEIGH ANN WOODARD, hus- 
band and wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that JEFF 
STRAUGHTER, a natural parent of 
said child, is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: General 
Delivery, Jacksonville, Florida. 
32244. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said JEFF STRAUGHTER appear 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Order 
and indicate his/her attitude {award 
the proposed adoption, or otherwise 
do what is necessary to protect 
his/her interest in this matter. 

It is fiirther Ordered that a copy of 
this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Cleric 

By: Rhonda V. Tynes, D.C. 

Enon Wade Woodard, p.q. 

Leigh Ann Woodard 

1605 Walsh Court. Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23454 

31-2 
4t8-19VBS 

I Public Notice I 

Auction: 1988 Yugo GL #5718 

Serial Number: #VX1BA1212- 
JK411733 
Auction date: August 11. 1992 
Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Compmiy, 70(X) N. Military 
Hwy.. Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right to Bid. 

31-1 
lt7.29VBS 



Public Notice 



Take notice that on 7-31-92, at 
10:00 AM. at the premises of 4747 
Shore Drive, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, the undersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash, reserving 
unto itself. Uie right to bid, the 
following mouv vehicle. 
1984 Lincoln Continental 
Swial #1MRBP97FOEY703185 
BAYSIDE MOTORS 

31-3 
lt7.29VBS 



PubHc Notice 



J 



Take notice that on 7-31-92. at 
10:00 AM, at the premises of 4747 
Shore Drive, Virginia Beach. Vir- 
ginia, the undersigned will ^11 at 
public auction, (or cash, reserving 
unto itself, the right to bid. the 
following motor vehicle. 
1980 Tkxi Fairmont 
Serial #OK94B 129415 
BAYSIDE MOTORS 

31-4 
It7-29VBS 



I 



[ 



Pubic Notice 



J 



Take notice that <m 7-31-92, at 
10:00 AM, at the jaemiKs <rf 4747 
Shew Drive. Virginia Beach, Vir- 

D ConthiiMd On ft^ • 



g Vgginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 29. 1992 

Q ContlnMd From ftg* 7 

ginia, the undersigned will sell at 

[Hiblic auction, for cash, reserving 

unto itself, the right to bid, the 

following motor vehicle. 

1980 Chrysler Fifth Avenue 

Swial #1C3BF66P9GX559213 

BAYSIDE MOTORS 

31-5 
It7-29VBS 



[ 



PubHcNotic* 



Take notice , that on August 3, 
1992. at 10:00 o'clock A.M., at the 
premises of 47S3 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Viipnia Beach, Virginia 
23462, the undersiped will sell at 
public auction, f<x cash only, re- 
serving the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicle: 
1982 BUICK CENTURY 
Serial «1G14AL19ESCD474132 
31-6 
lt7.29VBS 



[ 



PubHc Nolice 



J 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 13th day of 
July. 1992. 

In re: Adoption of Amber Nicole 
Wildermuth 

By: Bruce Todd Wildermudi and 
Lisa Ann Wildermuth, Petitioners 

To: Thomas M. Doak c/o Wild 
Cat Inn and Tavern, Box T, Jack- 
son. NH 03846 

IN CHANCERY #CA92-155 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
This day came Bruce Todd Wil- 
dermuth and Lisa Ann Wildermuth. 
Petitioners, and represented that the 
object of this proceeding is to effect 
the adoption of the above named 
infant. Amber Nicole Doak, by 
Bruce Todd Wildermuth and Lisa 
Ann Wildermuth, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been made and 
filed that Thomas M. Doak. a 
natural parent of the said child, is a 
non-resident of the State of Vir- 
ginia, the last known post office 
acklress being: c/o Wild Cat Inn «id 
Tavern, Box T, Jackson, NH 
03846. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said Thomas M. Doak appear before 
this Court within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order and indi- 
cate his/her attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect his/her 
interest in this matter. 

It is further Ordned that a copy of 
this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun. a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 
A copy teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit; Cleft 
By: Rhonda V. Tynes, D.C. 
Bartley F. Tuthill, IV, p.q. 

30-7 
4t8-12VBS 



Pubac Notice 



In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 17th day of July, 
1992. 

RACHEL M. RIVERA, Plain- 
tiff, against 

HECTOR J. RIVERA. Defen- 
dant 

Docket #CH92-1513 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds of liv- 
ing separate and apart for six 
months, having no children and 
having entered into a separation 
agreement 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defendant is 
not a resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post office 
address being 25 Castelar, Rota, 
Spain. It is ordered that Hector J. 
Rivera do appear on or before the 
8th of September, 1992, and do 
what may be necessary to protect 
his interest in this suit 

It is ftuiherOrdoed diata copy of 
this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy— Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Linda D. Jones. D.C. 

William R. Brown, p.q.. 

716 Cumboland Avenue 

Portsmmith, Virginia 23707 

30-6 
4t-g-12VBS 



Public NoNce 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIR- 
GINIA V. 

$720.00 UNITED STATES 
CURRENCY 
DOCKET#CL92-624 
TO: KENNETH D. REID 
2718 LEO STREET 
M)RPOLK, VIRGINIA 
ORDER OF P UBLICATION 
TTOS DAY CAME tlwAtttmiey 
fOT the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honorable Court to forfeit to 
the Commonwealth of Virginia 
$720.00 United States Currency 
Aat was seized cm February 8, 1992 
from Koui^ D. Reid. 
AN Information was made. 



signed and flied with the Circuit 
Court Clerk's Office on March 6, 
1992 on the above matter. Said in- 
formation stated the owner of the 
currency and the last known address 
of the owner at the time the Infor- 
mation was filed. 

It iqjpearing that the whereabouts 
of Kenneth D. Reid is currently 
unknown, and that a registered letter 
has been mailed to his last known 
address, it is hereby ORDERED, 
that all parties appear on or before 
August 10, 1992. and do whatever 
is necessary to protect their interest 
in said properties. 

It is further ORDERED that this 
Order of Publication be published 
once a week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach. 

ENTER this 8th day of July. 
1992. 

J. Curtis Fruit. Clerk of Circuit 
Court 

By Barbara S. Murden, Deputy 
Clerk 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

KAREN L. LINDEMANN 

DEPUTY COMMON- 
WEALTHS ATTORNEY 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Attorney 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S6 

30-2 
4t8-12VBS 

Public NoWce 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
•COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIR- 
GINIA v. 

$87.00 UNITED STATES 
CURRENCY 

$425.00 UNITED STATES 
CURRENCY 

DOCKET* CL92-16 

DOCKET* CL92-15 

TO: WAYNE A. BARCLAY 

714 20TH STREET #101 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23451 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honorable Court to forfeit to 
the Commonwealth of Virginia 
$87.00 United States Currency and 
$425.00 United States Currency 
that was seized on November 12, 
1991 from Wayne A. Barclay. 

Informations were made, signed 
and filed with the Circuit Court 
Clerk's Office on January 2, 1992 
on the above matters. Said 
informations stated the owner of the' 
currency and the last known address 
-of the owner at the time4he Infor- 
mation was filed. 

It appearing that die whoeabouts 
of Wayne A. Barclay is currently 
unknown, and that a registered letter 
has been mailed to his last known 
address, it is hereby ORDERED, 
that all parties appear on or before 
August 10, 1992, and do whatever 
is necessary to protect their interest 
in said properties. 

It is further ORDERED that this 
Order of Publication be published 
once a week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach. 

ENTER this 8th day of July, 
1992. 

J. Curtis Fruit. Clerk of Circuit 
Court 

By Barbara S. Murden, Deputy 
Clerk 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

KAREN L. LINDEMANN 

DEPUTY COMMON- 
WEALTHS ATTORNEY 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Attraney 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 

30-3 
4t8-12VBS 

I Pubflc NoHce 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIR- 
GINIA v. 

ONE MOTOROLA PAGER 

ONE 1989 HYUNDAI SONATA 

$500.00 use 

DOCKET* CL92-523 

DOCKET* CL92-521 

DOCKET* CL92-487 

TO: BOBBY JOHN TODD 

717 GUY AVENUE *13 

NORTOLK. VIRGINIA 

ESTATE OF LEONARD H. 
ORE 

2838 TIDEWATER DRIVE 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

ORDER OF PUBLICATinN 

THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honc»mble Court to fCHfeit to 
the Commonwealth of Virginia 
One Motorola Piget, One 1989 
Hyumki Sonata aid $500.00 United 
Stales Currency that was seized m 
Januffly 28, 1992 fn»n hakby Jcim 
Todl 

Informati(ms were m»fe, signed 
and filed with the Circuit Court 
Clerk's Office on February 27, 
1992, March 1 1, 1992 and F^^ua^ 
27, 1992, respectively, on the 
aboye matters. Said informaticms 
stated the owners of the propettka 
tnd the la^ bwwn address c€ tlw 



ownera at the time the Infoonations 
was filed. 

It iqjpearing that the whereabouts 
of Bobby John Todd is currently 
unknown, and that a registered tetter 
has been mailed to his last known 
address, it is hereby ORDERED, 
that all parties ^pear on or before 
August 10, 1992, and do whatever 
is necessary to protect their interest 
in said properties. 

It is further ORDERED that this 
Order of Publication be published 
once a week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach. 

ENTER this 8th day of July, 
1992. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk of Circuit 
Court 

By Barbara S. Murden, Deputy 
Clerk 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

KAREN L. LINDEMANN 

DEPUTY COMMON- 

WEALTHS ATTORNEY 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Attorney 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 

30-4 
4t8-12VBS 



Public Notic* 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIR- 
GINIA V. 

$1855.00 UNITED STATES 
CURRENCY 
DOCKET* CL92- 11 56 
TO: MICHAEL WILLIAMS 
1605 MARCIANO DRIVE 
PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA 
ORPEROFPi;gLICATON 



THIS DAY CAME the Attorney 
for the Commonwealth and moved 
this Honorable Court to forfeit to 
the Commonwealth of Virginia 
$1855.00 United States Currency 
that was seized on March 27, 1992 
from Michael Williams. 

AN Information was made, 
signed and filed with the Circuit 
Court Clerk's Office on April 27, 
1992 on the above matter. Said in- 
formation stated the owner of the 
currency and die last known address 
of the owner at die time die Infor- 
mation was fded. 

It appearing that die whereabouts 
of Michael Williams is currently 
unknown, and diat a registered letter 
has been mailed to his last known 
address, it is hereby ORDERED, 
that all parties appear on or before 
August 10, 1992. and do whatever 
is necessary to protect dieir interest 
in said propoties. 

It is further ORDERED tfiat this 
Order of Publication be published 
once a week for four successive 
weeks in die Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
die City of Virginia Beach. 

ENTER diis 8Ui day of July, 
1992. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk of Circuit 
Court 

By Barbara S. Murden, Deputy 
Clerk 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

KAREN L. LINDEMANN 

DEPUTY COMMON- 
WEALTHS ATTORNEY 

Office of the Commonwealth's 
Attorney 

Municipal Center 

Virginia Beach. Virginia 23456 

30-5 
4t8-12VBS 



Pick Up The Virginia Beach Sun 
At Any Of These Locations: 



Dr. Video 

Aragona Boulevard 

Open House Diner 

106 Aragona Boulevard 

Super Fresh 
Rosemont Road 



Days bin 

Atlantic Avenue 

Sea Vacationer 

Right of 34th Street 

Belvedere Resort iVbtei 

36th and Oceanfront 



The Sun Building 

138 South Rosemont Road 


On The Street 

Atlantic Avenue 


Marketplace 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

AKiplasItniirStore 

HiiiB^^ ^-: "•■ 

RevcoDrug 

Hilltop 

VIrgbila Beach 
General Hospital 

First Colonial Road 


Waffle'a 'n Things 
Comer of Pacific Avenue 
and Laskin Road 

Fariri Fresh 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Phar-Mor 
Regency Hilhop 

Texaco Food Mart 

1912 Laskin Ro«J 


Hess's Sub Shop 
Great Neck Village 


Peoples Drug Store 
980 Laskin Road 


Super Fresh 

Hilltop Plaza I • > a 


The Beach Pub 
1001 Laskin Road 


Holiday Food Store 
General Booth Boulevard 


Shape'a Salon 

1065 Laskin Road 


Thomae Murphy 

1000 Pacific Avenue 


Belo Supermarket 

London Bridge Shopping Ctr. 


17th Street Surf Shop 

Pacific Avenue 


Hilltop inn 

1284 Laskin Road . 


Box on Street 

17th Street 


Marketplaoe 
1284 Laskin Road 


Sir Aflon inn 

19 Mediterranean Avenue 


Farm Fresh 
Uskin Road 


Aquarius Motel 

1909 Atlantic Avenue 


Marketplace 
Laskin Road 


Comfort Inn 

2015 Atlantic Avenue 


Food Lkm- Outlet Mall 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 


Ocean Holiday 

25th and Atlantic Avenue 


Art/a Dell Restaurant 
Loehmanns Plaza 


Post Office 

Atiantk: Avenue 


Chamber of Commerce 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 


Ingram Pharmacy 
25th & Oceanfront 


Annabelle's 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 


Princess Anne Motei 
25th and Oceanfront 


FoodUon 

Pembroke Mall 



Seahawk Motei 

26th and Oceanfront 

The Boardwalk Inn 

2604 Atiantk: Avenue 

Seagull Motei 

27th and Oceanfront 

Viking Motel Cwp. 
2700 Atiantk: Avenue 

MardlGras Motel 
2802 Atlante Avenue 

OMsnfront Inn 
27th and Oceanfront 



Farm Fresh 

Independence Boulevard 

Peoplea Drug Sore 

^(Q3 Indepencence Boulevard 

Beio 

Northampton Boutovard 

CrkAetInn 

Northamf^n Boulevard 

FoodUen 

Newtown Road « Bidter ftoad 



The Vli^la Beach Sun 

For Home DeHvery, News Or Advertising, 
Caa 486-3430 



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'NawCofnnwclal -HonM UnIK From 
(190.00. Ump( -Lollont- AccaMO- 
rlM. Monthly Paynwnli Low u 
$ta.OO.CMTadwFREENEWColor 
Catalog. 1-800-228-6292. 

AMERICAN RETIREMENTHOMES 
-S1,000«. Inchidn room, board, 
vtHltiM, 24 hf. nura* auiilad am- 
bulalory/non-ambulalofy cara. 
CharloRaavllla, Lnlnglon, Noftolk. 
VA Baach, CIHton Forga, Enporia, 
South Hill, Tappahannock, Porta- 
mouth, Qloucaatar, VA., alao 
Panaacola, FL. 1-800-889-8837. 

FRIENDLY HOME PARTES hat 
<ip«nlngtlo<damon«lralori.Naca>h 
Invaatmant. Noaarvicachargo. High 
commlwlon and hotlaaa awardt. 
Two catalog!, ovar 600 Itama. Call 
1-800-488-4875. 

MyrtiaBaach RESORT VACATION 
RENTALS -Ocaanfront condoi. 
houaakaaplng Includad. Indoor/out- 
door pool!, whirlpoott, taunaa, 
UgMadlannlacouna, putting graana. 
QoN pacKagat avallabla. Fraa bro- 
chura: 1-800-448-S6S3. 

DONATE YOUR CAR, TrucH, 
Motorhoma, Boat. Raal Ettala 
Slampa,Colni,Collacll>laa.toFoun- 
dallon Saning tha Blind I.R.S. ta> 
daductlbia, FREE TOWINQ: NEED 
NOT RUN 1-800-995-8889. 

WE BUY MORTGAGES And Trutt 
Oaadt. Did You Sail Proparty? Ra- 
caivlng PaymanK? Why WaitI Faat. 
Caah Nowl Any SIza -Nalionwida. 
Qraat Pricaa. Call 1 -eOO-659-CASH 
(2274). Mortgagaa Buyara ol 
Amarlca. 

WHITEWATER RAFTING, Watt 
Virginia'! Now and Qaulay RIvart. 
July tpaclajt. Call today lor Iraa 
brochura -1-800-633-RAFT. DrUt- 
A-Bi, Inc., P.O. Box 885, Fayaltavllla, 
WV 25840. 

AVIATION MAINTENANCE - Train- 
ing. FAA Cartlflad -Financial Aid 
Navy Tuition Aaalat ( Vatarant 
Banadti Approvad-P.lacamanI At- 
tiatanca. RiCE AVIATION -S202 
W. Military Hwy. Hangar 7 Chata- 
paaka, VA. 2332 1 (804) 465-28 1 3. 



Studantt...Arrh«lngAugual...HOST 
FAMILIES NEEDEDI Amarlcan 
Inlarcullural Studant Eichanga. Call 
Irana(804)746-S416or1-800-Sia- 
LING. 

LOG HOME DEALERS WANTED. 
High Committiont. Training Sami- 
nan, in-houta Financing, No Fran- 
chlta Faai, HONEST ABE LOG 
HOMES. Roula Ona. Box 84CVD, 
Moat, Tannattao3SS75. (800) 231- 
3895. 

GASTON LAKE -VA/NC 1-800-338- 
881 6. Fraa Laka Map/Buyati Quida. 
Ovar 75 watartront lots, houtai, 
ale. Caii/writa Tanglawood Raally 
(804) 838-2204, Box 1 16. Sracay, 
VA 23919. 

Military Ratlraa -Channput tuppla- 
mant wlil pay tha 2S% allowad. 
plut100% ot all axcatt chargat. 
For brochurat call 1 -800-627-2824 
axt. 259. 

PIONEER STEEL BUILDINGS - 
24x30x10 -$3,595.00; 30x40x10 ■ 
$4,650.00; 30x60x12 -$6,79500; 
40x75x12 $8,895.00; 50x lOOx 14 - 
$13,395.00: 80x100x14 
$21 ,995.00. All SIzet Erection AvalF 
ablaMlnl-Slor age 1-800-637-5414. 

DECK TOP BOATHOUSE w/holil 
on V2 acre. Fully rip-rappad there 
line. Ready lor your boat on Smith 
Mtn. $69,900. Walker Oavekipmani 
1-800-377-0470. Ownar/Agent. 

CHRISTIAN SINGLES Local, Work)- 
wkje - Phone, Mail inlroductiont 
Text. Find Love, Dating, Marriage, 
Meaningful Companlonihip tha 
Sanaiblawayl No Faat, Donationa 
only. Free Brochura, Samplet; 1- 
800-323-8113 Ext 381. 

LYNCHBURG AREA. S ac. rettrlcted 
kitt ttaning at, $9,900. 5 ac. unre- 
Itrkrted loti ttarting, $5,900. Some 
owner/agent. Soma ownar/linanc- 
ing. Ok;k Somazza 1-800-553-2732 
FradaYaatttR.E. 

HAPPY JACK TABLICKS: Prevent 
llaaa Mother Natura't way without 
paatlcldat. Chawable 8 nutrltlout 
tablet. For Dogt 8 Cate. At feed 8 
drugatorat. 



MAKEAFRIEND...FORLIFEIScan- Truck Drivart - $2,000 llgn-on bo- 
dinavian, European, Yugoalavlan, nua lor tale, qual. drivera w/8 miht 
South American, J^>anata High 0TRaxp.Upta3(Vml.lattart.plut 
School Exchange 2/ml.MPQbanua8k>adlng/unh>ad- 



ing pay. Tultkm nimburMmaflt avail, 
(up to $5,000) lor drKrIng ichool 
grade. Tuition-lreetralnlnglorthote 
w/no axp. Hutband/wKa teamt wel- 
come. Mual ba 21 . w/good driving 8 
workhiuory. COM TRANS Inc. (Gan. 
Freight Subtldlary ol North Amarl- 
can Van LInaa). 1-80O-7S9-8980. 
Oapt. a-572. 

TRUCK DRIVE RS -1 yr. axp. -up to 
2e«/mi. to Mart. Choota van or Hat. 
Tuillon-lree training lor thoie w/no 
axp. Great banaliti. Call Poola Truck 
Line 1-800-553-9443. OapL W-71. 

IF YOU'RE ALWAYS DRIVING • 
BUT NEVER GOING ANYWHERE. 
At Munion Tranaportalion. our driv- 
art expect tha bait Irom ut -and 
Ihay gat It. Join ut, and make tha 
moat ot your time, pay and your 
future. We offer: -excellent pay •mlla- 
aga bonui Mop banefita -on-board 
tatelllle communlcaltont -panonal 
fleet manager -indlviduaiized HOME 
TIME Program -tupernr conven- 
Ikwal equipment -much more Call 
Munion today - and put yourcaraar 
In motion. 1-800-423-7629. 
MUNSON TRANSPORTATION 
Putting People FIrtt EOE. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR 
THE SELF-EMPLOYED. Finally - 
Allordable. Coat-EHectiva HotpMai 
Inturanca*. Sell Emptoyad/Small 
ButinMtat. ADDITIONAL 140 ban- 
elitilCALLTOOAY1 1-800428-4672 
('Underwriter PFL LIFE) 

Got a campground membarthip or 
timeihare? We'll take It. Amerk^'t 
moil lucceitl ui retort ratala dear- 
inghouie. Call Retort Saiai Inlor- 
matlon toll Irea hotline 1-800-423- 
5967 

••LOG HOME DEALERSHIP" Top 
Log Home Manulacturer. taekt 
Dealer. Protected territory, high 
earning potential, full training 8 laadt 
provided. Need not Interfere with 
preaant emptoymenl. Models start- 
ing at $9690. 1-800-264-LOGS 
(5647) ••BRENTWOOD LOG 
HOMES, 427 River Rock Blvd., 
Murlreatboro, TN 37129. 

Truck Owner-Operatora. (2,000 
tign-on bonua lor drivart with 6 
montht axparlenoe. Traclorpurchaae 
plan avalable. Taaira welcome. High 
Value Productt (Electrontes) Divl- 
ikin o( northAmerican Van Linat. 
1-800-234-3112. Dapt. F242. 



ne^irand 

exciting 

every 

^Hreek! 



Keep Informed 
about what's 
going on in your 
community - 
have the news 
mailed to your 
house every 
weel(l 




Call The Virginia Beach Sun's 

circulation department 

today to subscribe. 

486-3430 

e 

The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 8. Rosemont Rd., Suite 209 
Virginia Beach, VA 23452 



/ 



Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 29. 1992 9 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Call Sharon today to place 
your ad in the classifieds. 

547-4571 




11 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PERSONAL 
RATES 



20Wof«ls 
orlMs 



AddKkMial 

WONi* 



1 time $ 7.50 .35 

2 times $13.50 .70 
4 times $22.50 1.40 

Run your personal Classified Ad four times for only $22.50. You 
can cancel your ad at any time. 

All Classified Ads run in three newspapers (The Vi^inia Beach Sun. The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additional charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 1 








































20 words 



Run my personal ad for . 
Payment Is enclosed $ . 



Issues. 



Make check payable to Byeriy Publications 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327. Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name 

Address 

City -_ 



FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 



PERSONAL ADS mutt b« placed by pr*- 
vale individuals. Comtrardal and buil- 
natt related ads do not quality for 2-tiina 
and 4-iime personal ralM. 



COMBINATION RATE : Run Ihii tamapartonal ad in any 
other Byarly Pubtcaticns newtpapar for an additional S3 
on* ikne, $S t«w> tliT,es, S7 lour timas. Nawapapan In 
Franklin. Ennporla. LawrenoavWa, OInwiddie and Palart- 
burg.CalS47-4S7llordaiaili. | 



ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES 



BOATS 



10,000 SQ. FT. FURNITURE- 
GLASS-CLOCKS-DOLLS-MUCH 
MUCH MORE. OPEN 7 DAYS. 10- 
5, 1804 GRANBY ST. 622-0905. 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



BMW-(2) 2002, 74 good condition & 

76 fair condition. Price for both 

- $3|p^8^279. 



33 FT. GEMENI CATAMARAN-bet- 
ter than new. 12 plus knots. 
Spacious, live aboard, cruiser/racer. 
Lots of extra equipment. Call 480- 
2260. 

CHECKMATE-1981. 20'. 1987 350 
h.p. Evinrude. 1990 trailer. Ap- 
praised for $21 ,500. Sell for $1 2,500 
or best offer. 425-0526. ' 



t*^-^.^ms^^ 




CARPET SERVICE 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



CARPET CLEAN SPEOAL 
$39.95 

Whole House. 588-4139 



CLEANING 



ALMOST NEW, PROFESSIONAL 
PRESSURE WASHING 

Remove mildew, dirt & unwanted 
stains. Free estimates. 547-9175. 



KITTS FLOOR SERVICE 

Oak floors installed, sanding & 
finishing. All types of home 
improvements. 55 years exp. 488- 
6985. 

THE HOME CENTER-the 
cheapeast guy in town. Siding, 
roofing, painting. 393-6324, 488- 
0969. 



EXTERMINATING 



PLASTERING 



RID YOUR YARD OF FLEAS, TICK- 
S & other pests - let us spray. Free 
estimates, landscape design. 
Tidewater Landscaping Service. 
421-2700. 



WIDNER PLASTER 
OR DRYWALL • 

Do you want a good, dean, guaran- 
teed job? We can do it. Circle 
ceilings, sprayed ceilings & repair 
anything. 487-8690, Richard. 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



PROF-SERVICES 



OLD HOUSE SPECIALIST-En- 
gineer will provkie consulting ser- 
vces and/or act as general contrac- 
tor on large or small restorations or 
repairs. Reasonabe. 399-4536. 



RESUMES-$12.95 AND UP 

WE DO IT ALL. Career Pro. 
Portsmouth. 397-9902. 




ROOFING & GUTTERING 



ROOFING 

Low prices, references, all work 
guaranteed. Free estimates. Call 
455-3536. 



BUS. OPPORTUNITIES 



TREE SERVICE 



ACnCM TREE SERVICE 

Since 1965. Complete service. 
Lk^nsed, insured. Free estimates. 
Firewood. Tim Taytor. 399-6588. 



WALL PAPERING 



WALLPAPERING 

Low prices, references, all work 
guaranteed. Free estimates. Call 
^5-%36, 



NORFOLK 



Best Fare ^o 
Round Trip TOKYO 

JAPAN TRAVEL SEtl\^^ INa 

1-800-822-3336 



SERVPRO Cleaning & Restoratton 
Franchise. 34 K Completel Join the 
best team. Call 800-826-9586. 

$150,000.f RANGE 

Executive needed to administer es- 
tablished marketing program. In- 
vestment of $32,000 is required. 
Everything is provkJed. This is not a 
franchise. For a confidential inter- 
view call 
800-245-6224 > 

PRINT SHOP-For sale. Established 
16 years. Heart of NorfoNt financial 
district. Call 622-7363. Principles 
only. 

ASSOCIATE WANTED: Unusual 
maintenance 00. serving customers 
in densely populated area of NJ 
wishes to open office in rural VA. 
Grossing $500,000+. Hi repeat, very 
profitable. Ownership oppt'y 
available. $14,500. req'd. Baron, 
201-736-8523. 



BUS. PROP/SALE 



COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS in 
downtown Portsmouth and 
Churchland. Call 399-8390, 484- 
1275 or 399-3298. Owner/Agent. 



CHILD CARE 



HOME CHILD CARE PROVIDER 
STRIVING TO HELP THE 
WORKING PARENT 
Academk: programs for all ages 2 1/ 
2 to school age. Cirk;ulum-Primary 
through school ages uses ABEKA. 
The hours are: 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. 545- 
8163 

CHESAPEAKE 
BABYSIT-NON-SMOKING CHRIS- 
TIAN HOME. Full/part-time. Drop- 
ins wek^me. Fenced in yard with 
swingset. Snacks provided. 
Reasonable rates. 545-3800. 

CHILD CARE-KNELL'S RIDGE. 
Planned activities, meals, 
reasonable rates. 5 years ex- 
perience with references. Flexible 
hours. 436-6664. 

CHILD CARE IN MY HOME 
anytime. Negotiable rates, military 
wife. 5 years experience, two 
children of my own. Birdneck 
kxation. Call SheffI 422-441 6. 

BABYSITTING-Would love tO-do 
chikJcare in my Lynnhaven hotne. 
Equipped for any age, 6 a.m.-6 p.m., 
Mon.-Fri.. very reasonable rates. 
Call Billie: 486-8124. 



COMPUTER/EQUIPMENT 



COMPUADD-286 COMPUTER. 5 1/ 
4 & 3 1/2 disk drives, 40 mag. HD, 
DOS 4.01, CVGA monitor 14 In., 
Panasonic Dot Matrix printer, 
Smartcom 2400 baud modem, 
software included. ^,200. Call 523- 
1394. Ask for WilL 



HELP WANTED 



ADVERTISING DISTRIBUTION 

National Advertising Program seeks 
part-time Indivkiual to maintain ads 
on monthly basis. All materials 
provided, must have dependable 
transportation. Excellent earning 
potential. For more informatbn call 
1-800-676-2636. 8:30-5:30 Pacifk: 
Standard Time. 

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS 
NEEDED. ALL PHASES. 

First 70K tax free. Rek>cation, food 
& housing paid. 

1-000-330-9335 

$200-$500 WEEKLY 

Assemble products at homia. Easy I 
No selling. You're pakj direct. Fully 
Guaranteed. FREE lnformatk)n-24 
Hour Hotline. 601-379-2900 
Copyright #VA129DH 

Marketing Research kitervlewsr 
Training courae July 30, 7-9:30 
p.m. Part-time evening 
emptoyment, $5/hr. to attendees 
who successfully complete 
course. No sales Involvsd. 
Needed: pisassnt voice, good 
verbal communicatton & reading 
skills. Call Midge, INFOCUS 
Group Services for course 
rsssrvatton, W)-13S1. 

EASY WORK. EXCELLENT PAY. 
Assemble products at home. Call toll 
free 1 -»}0-467-5S%. ext. 7699. 



CONSTRUCTION 

NEEDED 

IMMEDIATELY 

All skills up to 

$70,000. Tax free, 

paid expenses. 

1-800-435-9744 



UVE PSYCHIC COUNSELING 

Tarot Readings • Attroiogy • Look Into Your Future 

1-900-^»4-1444 $1.79 par minuta 

1-800-^5-5580 InfoiC.C. 
WkuHtrMkliie. Lektwoo4,CO 18* 



HELP WANTED 



SALES REP 

Natkjnal co. seeks sales REP to 
call on accounts in your area. $40 K 
to $80 K First year Comm. Potential. 
4<»-728-9998. 

TELEPHONE SALES 

Working from our Chesapeake 
offtee, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Mon.-Fri. 
Excellent opportunity for housewife 
or sentor dtizen. Call 547-4571 . 

PART-TIME-Exp. in phone sales 
helpful. Work at home. Great in- 
come opportunity. Up to $50 per 
hour possible. 428-5720. 

PART-TIME-Sell Petra Lingerie with 
home party plan. All lingerie under 
$35. Free kit. excellent income. Car 
req'd. 1-800-484-1031. Code 9802. 

GREAT BRIDGE: PROFESSIONAL 
couple seeks loving, dependable 
female to care for one-year-old chiki 
in our home. 25-30 hours/wk. 
guaranteed. (Days, no weekends). 
Should be non-smoker and have 
own transportatton. CPR certifk»- 
tlon desirable. Pay commensurate 
with experience. References 
required. Mrs. Bondy - 482-6941. 

MAKE MONEY FROM HOME 

Telephone calling for charitable 
organization. No selling, good pay. 
Call 486-0286. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. only. 

PRACTICE MANAGER 

Established ' Portsmouth Surgical 
Practkse seeking experienced medi- 
cal & practk:e manager to handle & 
supervise overall operatbns of the 
practice. Responsibilities will 
inchjde: Supen/iskm & coordinatkin 
of ail office personnel functions, in- 
cluding expertise In financial 
reporting. Insurance computer & in- 
terfacing with outskJe contractors, 
requires excellent organizaten and 
communk:ation skills & 3 to 5 years 
previous medical management 
experience. Salary commensurate 
with experience. Send resume in- 
cluding salary history to: PRACTICE 
MANAGER, cto The Chesapeake 
Post. P.O. Box 1327. Chesapeake, 
VA 23327. 

KUWAIT/SAUDI JOBS: Skilled & 
unskilled mean & women needed. 
$35 + per hour. Paki Transp. Info. 
504-646-1 800 DEPT. KS1 081 ." 

PHOTO TRIMMERS 
EARN TO $125 PER DAY. NO 
EXPERIENCE NEEDED 
1-a00-262-43W 

"HUNDREDS OF FIRMS 

HIRING HOME WORKERS' 

For list, send $1 to Home Workers, 

10530 Lankford Hwy., Birds Nest, 

VA 23307. 

REPORTER 

Must have camera, car, college ex- 
perience or more. Full-time. Call 
547-4571 or send resume' and clip- 
pings to The Chesapeake Post. 
P.O. Box 1327. Chesapeake, VA 
23327. 

SALES REPRESENTATIVE 

An authorized AT&T security sys- 
tems dealer, k)cated in Hampton, 
seeks professional, ambitious, 
career-minded individuals im- 
mediately to work southside 
territory. Opportunity to advance into 
management and grow with young 
firm. Contact Ray Baker 625-0371 . 

PHOTOGRAPHY PROMOTIONS 
THE PERFECT JOB 

Several people needed to do 
promotional work in the exciting 
photographic field. No exp. 
necessary. We train. 466-1568. 



HOMES FOR SALE 



INVEST IN YOUR FUTURE NOWl 
FHA/HUDA/A government homes 
all areas. Low down. Great interest 
rates. Special incentives. Call Al 
Neely, Specialist. 456-9500, Realty 
Exeoitives. 



LIVESTOCK 



HORSE-2 yr. old Pak>mino paint 
stud. Started under saddle, very 
gentle. $6(X) negotiable. 482-8280. 



MISC. FOR SALE 



CHRISTMAS IS COMINGI Booking 
parties for Christmas and 
ornaments. 482-8397. 



INSTANT CASH paid for anUquea. 
All ktad*. Wia come toyou. 



VENDING/LOCAL 

$2 - $5,000 per month 

possible. Buy now and 

grow rich. 

1-800-723-7800 



MISC. FOR SALE 



URINE-ERASE guarantees removal 
urine stains, odors, from carpets. 
Regardless stain agel 24 hr. toll free 
information. Reidell Chemicals 
Limited 1-800-56-ERASE. 

HAPPY JACK FLEA GARD: All met- 
al patented device controls fleas In 
the home without PESTICIDES or 
EXTERMINATORS. Results 
overnight. INDUSTRIAL HDWE & 
SPLY 543-2232. 

KILLS FLEAS! 

Buy ENFORCER Flea Killers for 
pets, home & yard. Guaranteed 
effective! Buy ENFORCER at Rob- 
bies Home Center, 3410 High St., 
Portsmouth, VA. 

BRITISH ISLES RECIPES-Cornlsh 
Pasties, Devonshire Splits. 18 more, 
send $5.50 to Susan Pratt, P.O. box 
15356, Chesapeake, VA 23328- 
5356. 



MUSICAL 



PIANO-Baby Grand. "Chkikering.- 
refinished, nee ivory keys, excellent 
tone. Delivered. $1,895. Call 744- 
4761. 



PERSONALS 



A LOVING CHILDLESS COUPLE 
wishes to give your baby a happy, 
opportunity-filled future. Can pay 
legal and medical expenses. Please 
call Molly and Peter collect, (703) 
256-5492. 

ADOPTION-Loving couple, unable 
to have children, wishing to adopt an 
infant. Will pay legal/medical 
expenses. Call Tom or Judy, collect 
(703) 534-2033. 

PEN FRIENDS IN VIRGINIA 
& ACROSS THE NATION 
For friendship & possibly more, 
send $1 & a self-addresses, 
stamped envelope for more infor- 
matk>n & applk:ation to Club One, 
9955 River Road, Petersburg, VA 
23803. 

ADOPTION-WANTED A BABY-A 
dream come true for us. Warm, 
fuzzy, childless couple longs to 
share loving home with the child 
they can't have themselves. Can 
help with legal/medical expenses. 
Please^ l^'s talk.' Call ceHeot. Len & 
Susan (703) 768-HUGS. 

ADOPTION: Loving couple unable 
to have children wishes to help with 
medteal & legal expenses. Please 
call collect (804) 779-7829. 

ASTROLOGICAUNUMERICAL 
ANALYSIS. Your horoscope cateu- 
lated by a professbnal astrologer. 
Call 498-2471 orwrite to James. 
P.O. Box 1101. Virginia Beach. VA 
2341. 

ADOPTION 
We can give your baby a loving 
home, and can helpl Let's discuss 
"Open, Caring Adoptton" . . . Tom/ 
Lorraine (301) 897-9528 Collect. 

Women Business Owners are in- 
vited to attend Mon., Aug. 3 din- 
ner masting of Nattonal Associa- 
tion of Womsn Business Ownsrs- 
Tkiewater Chapter at Norfolk Air- 
port Hilton, 6KX) p.m. For more 
Information, call Grace Fuller 
Stanton, INFOCUS Group 
Services, 490-1381. 

YOUNG "31" HAPPILY MARRIED 
couple, unable to have a baby 
desires to share their k)ve with a 
white infant. Will provide warmth & 
security In a beautiful home. Can 
help with legal and medical 
expenses. Please call collect even- 
ings or weekends at (703) 444- 
4943. 

ADOPTION-YOUNG CHILDLESS 
COUPLE wishes to give a baby a 
happy and secure future. Lots of 
love from a full-time mom and 
devoted dad. Legal/medical paid. 
Call collect Cheryl and Chris 703- 
817-9884. 



USED & REBUILT 
PIANOS 



Area Tidewater Dealer 

Must Liquidate $50,(}00 

Worth Of Inventory By 

Aug. 25, 1992. Some 

New - Some Used - 

Floor Model - Bankrupt 

Stock. Merchandise Can 

Be Seen Locally. 

Call Credit Manager For 

More Information. 

1-800-346-1355 



REPORTER 

Must have camera, car, cbllege experience 
or more. Full-time. Call 547-4571 or send 
r^me* and cUppinp to The Chesapeake 
Po^ P.O. Box 1327, Ch^peake, VA 23327. 



PERSONALS 



ADOPTION 
Loving couple wishes to adof^ baby. 
Legal and medcal expenses pakf. 
Please call Ginny and Bill collect at 
703-241-8165. 



PET PERSONALS 



COMPUTERIZED PET 

CONNECTIONS 

One year stud listing $25. Also • tost, 

found, adopttons, litters & breeders. 

Call 463-4288 for more informatton. 



PETS 



COCK-A-TOO ■ White 2 1/2 yr. oW 
male. Cage/perch. Needs lots of 
attentton. Call 1-874-7540. 

WOLF HYBRID CUBS-8 weeks, 
black, female, hi %. Not of toeal 
breeding. Other $425 up. Suffolk. 1- 
986-3529. 

WHATS SO DIFFERENT ABOUT 
THE HAPPY JACK 3-X FLEA 
COLLAR? IT WORKSII Comalns 
NO synthetic pyrethrokfs. For dogs 
& catsi INDUSTRIAL HOME & 
SULLY. 543-2232. 

AMERICAN PIT BULL PUPPIES- 
Now taking deposits. Unregistered. 
Males $175 or best offer. Females 
$1 25 or best offer. Ready for pid(-up 
14 Aug. Cash only. Call anytime. 
543-7469. 

FREE 

KITTEN-MALE-12 WEEKS. 

HEALTHY-HAS SHOT RECORD. 

TELEPHONE: 436-0800. CALL 

AFTER 2 P.M. 



REAL ESTATE 



RESTAURANT-Seats 35. clean, 
equipped, in operation. Reasonable 
offers. Contact Jo 545-3915, 7 a.m. 
to 2 p.m., Mon. through Fri. 

GREENBRIER-Golf course 
communKy. 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 
family room, fence, whir^xwl tub, 
community pool. $975. Fran 
Spence, ERA. Ed Trotman Real 
Estate. 548-8505/467-5467. 

VA. BEACH-Furnished 3 bedroom, 
Chesapeake Bay. Summer weekly 
rental. 467-3304/481-6513. 



RENTALS 



VILLA HEIGHTS-Newly remodeled, 
new carpet, appliances, panted In- 
skie & out. Two bedroom, 1 bath, 
water & sewage included. $375 & 
security. 466-1 706. 



RVS 



AVCO-'80. 30', fiberglass & steel, all 
leather interior. Sleeps 6. 3 airs, 
microwave, central vac, 6.5 KW 
generator, futuristic design. $21,690 
or best offer. 425-0526. 



WATERFRONT 



LAKE GASTON, NC 

WATERFRONT HOMES & LOTS 

CALL FOR INFORMATK5N. 7 

DAYS. 

SUN SET REALTY 

1-800-333-3297. 



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Witness Center. 

year round Spa. & Sauna, 

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Open 'Daily 9-6; Sun 11-6 

On Providence Road 2 Mi. 



W.<rfMlUtary>fighway 

424-7867, 



Or 



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10 Virginia Beach Sun. Wednesday. July 29. 1992 

CLASP meeting, 
dance announced 

CLASP (Citizens Loving AH 
Special People) will hold its 
monthly business meeting on 
Tuesday, August 1 1 at 7:30 p.m. at 
the home of Harry and Juanita 
Baird, 3900 Rumford Lane. 

All voting members are invited 
to attend. All other interested per- 
sons arc also invited. 

For further information call Harry 
Baird at 486-31 10. 

Also, a dance for physically and 
mentally handicapped people from 
Virginia Beach will be held Satur- 
day, August 15, 1992, from 5 to 
7:30 p.m. at the Bow Creek Recre- 
ation Center, 3427 Clubhouse 
Road. 

The dance will be sponsored by 
the Fraternal Order of VDT/SEAL, 
the Virginia Beach Pepartment of 
Parks and Recreation and CLASP 
(Citizens Loving All Special Peo- 
ple). 

Participation is free. Refresh- 
ments will be served and door prizes 
will be given. The latest hits will 
be played. Parents and guardians are 
welcome, but chaperoncs are always 
present. 

Transportation is available at $6 
per roundtrip per individual. 
CLASP must know by August 1. 
Call Carolyn Tipold at 588-8693. 

For further information call Harry 
Baird at 486-3110. 



BY ORDER OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Hoedowns, and fun 

The Virginia Beach Farmer's 
Market, 1989 Landstown Road, has 
announced the following activities 
for August through December. 

They include, pony rides, Friday 
night hoedowns, band contests, a 
country day fair, country carnival, 
haunted house, DARE family day, 
fail and Christmas festival. 

For more detailed information 
call 427-4395. 



Search and rescue 

D Continued From Page 3 

The Virginia Beach 
Urban Search and 
Rescue Task Force. 

(known as VA-2 in federal circles) 
will receive matching funds from 
the federal government to purchase 
some of the sophisticated equip- 
ment needed to perform the task of 
search and rescue in collapsed 
structures. This task force will be 
required to be fully mobilized and 
deployed by way of military 
aircraft within six hours of being 
called. A fully-staffed task fOTce 
consists of 56 persons. 

The city of Virginia Besch, by 
being selected as one of the 
nation's 25 national teams, has 
demonstrated its progressive 
approach to service delivery in the 
fu-e and resCue arena. The develop- 
ment of a program for the citizens 
of Virginia Beach has led to 
national recognition and selection 
as one of the nation's most progres- 
sive systems, reflecting on the 
leadership of the city and the fire 
department. 

This selection is only one of the 
national awards presented to both 
the Virginia Beach Technical Team 
and the Tidewater Regional 
Technical Rescue Team. In 1988 
the team won the outstanding 
governmental program award from 
the Intemati(H)al Association of 
Fire Chiefs and the International 
Cily Managers Association. In June 
of 1992, the fire department's 
Technical Rescue Team received 
an award from Rutgers University, 
Center for Public Productivity, for 
innovation in government, one of 
only 25 national such awards. 
Urban search and rescue is a 
rapidly developing, yet still 
fledgling science which the 
Virginia Beach Fire Department 
began practicing eight years ago. 
The enormity with which these 
types of events occur can only be 
envisioned by many of us from 
what we have seen on television. 
Events such as the Lwna Prieta 
earthquake, ihe Philippines 
earthquake, Arm^ia, Hurricane 
Hugo and other catastrophic 
disasters strike without warning, 
resulting in mass destruction. When 
these types of scenarios unfold, the 
National Urban Search and Rescue 
Teams will be called upon to 
perform dramatic rescues under 
dangerous conditions. 

Virginia Beach is proud to say 
that uaining and leadership in this 
field has led to the recognition of 
our cily as one of the best in llw 
world. 

This article was compiled 
through Ihe courtesy of Chase N. 
Sargeant, battalion chief, fire and 
rescue operations, city of Virginia 
Beach.